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LIBRARY 



OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 

NO •J?48, 4 J OATE 65*'*-1 

SOURCE CoJLdjH^- KaAA^W 



(Is book may be kept out 

TWO WEEKS 

and is subject to a fine of TWO 
• NTS a day thereafter. It will be due on 
day indicated below. 



- 






T H X 



C0LL1G1 8I0HAL 



▼ ol. XIX. 

SEPTEMBER, 1908 
to 
JUKE, 1909. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 

Amherst. 



TIE COLLEGE SI&IAL 






r ■ » 



VOL. 19 



NO. 1 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 









COLLEGE 




AMHERST. MASS., SEPTEMBER SO. 1906 



i 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






: 









GOODS FOR MEN 




Spring and Summer Woolen* Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAIM)K «'rOW»£ 
II AMITY STREET, - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. ,\ 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Tki.ki-honk 54-4. 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 

CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMMEKST, MASS 



the: 
DAIRY EnPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANSINQ, MICHKJAN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



Rabar's 3nii t 

Olil South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, MAS* 

Modem Improv-eim-nts, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Oulaine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB. DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 



SHORT COURSE! MEN 
I place buttermakers, cheesemakers, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



It's Your Next at the 



Merc) House Barber Stop 



Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 7 a. m. to 8 p. M. 
Tuesdays 7 " 6 " 

Wednesdays, 7 " 8 " 

Thursdays, 7 " 6 " 

Fridays, 7 " 8 " 

Saturdays, 7 " n" 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

lor over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Pest Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, M% Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge M VO" mention 
the College Signal. 




44 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



THE Cf -U1TIU1ER WW, 



14-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



Athletes Attention! 



In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, basket Ball, 
RunningShoes,Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
— our trademark means something. 

Send for our Catalogue. It is free toany addrets. 

WRIGHT «Ss DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

18 WEST joth ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, K. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

Telephone connections direct to our 
UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

Hear First National Bank, AMHERST 




CapsatidGotcns 

Makers to "06, '07/08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONSITVINING. 

262 Fourth Av , Nkw You. 












We woHld like a share of your patronage, we are re.iab.e and we., know. 
All the boy, K et the habit of eoming to us when they know the town. We 
have CustoL a'nd Ready-made Cothing, Sweaters, G.oves, Oil Cloth.ng, and ,n 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 

page's SDoe Store 

Next to Post Office. 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing dene by power machines, as 
good as new. 



E. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 
VIOIilN, BAHJO, HIRH00U1H, CUITAH STWflGS. 



THE MANAGER OF THIS PAPER USES A 

Smith Premier 
Typewriter 

AND IS PLEASED TO SAY THAT IT GIVES 

Perfect Satisfaction. 



0CCULI8T8 PRESCRIPTIONS PILLBD. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



7^HERSt7~MASS., S^PT^M^e1r~307~1908 



NO. 1 



^u^h^dl^tn^iy^y^ of the Massachusetts Agricultural Colter^ ^ ^ 

»e n t to all subscriber, until Itt discontinuance it order* and arrears .re part, iuoec 

notify the Bu siness Manager. __ __ " 

— BOARD OF IDIT0E8. 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Edttor-la-Chlef. 
O. B. BRIGGS. 1909. Business Manager. 
p p nAMON 1 910, Assistant Business Manager. 

E. F. DAMON. i»i«. ^ R.CLARKE. 1910, Department Note.. 

R. C. POTTER. 1909. College Notea. L c BR0WN , 1 9 1 0. Athletic Notes. 

M. F. CEER. 1909, Alumni Notea. A BROOKS. 1910. Special. 

r H WHITE 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notea. 

C. H. wmifc. ■»•-. R N HALLOWE LL. 1911. 

S. R. PARS ONS. 1911. . 

Z ___ Cmai— lOe. Pof as o^tdsToTlJsttod State, ead Csssds, Messrs. 

Term-, fl.00 per far Is adoa.ee Stagl. Copt—, 10c. J^g 

R. C. Lindblad. Prea. 
F. T. Haynes, Manager. 
C. H. White. Prea. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 
H. W.Turner, Prea. 



Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association, 
Basket- Ball Association. 
base Ball Association. 
College Senate, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 

M. W. Thompson. Manager 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke. Manager- 
K. E. Olllett. Preaident. 



Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 
The Union. 



Entered as secend-claae matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi*tbri&.s. 



This issue of the Signal goes to press under the 
stress of more news than tt will hold. Four pages 
have been added but in spite of this the review of the 
Summer School and a summary of those Com- 
mencement exercises not covered in the last issue, 
together with other notes of Interest must be held for 
the next number. The news of immediate interest 
must be handled while the iron is hot ; historical 
accounts must wait. It Is hoped that an Insert com 
prising the pictures of the new memhers of the faculty 
may appear also. 



Yet again It becomes the pleasant task of an edi- 
tor of the Signal to welcome a new class of men to 
•Old Massachusetts." Not that you have not 
already been introduced to M. A. C. its life and 
some of its customs, for President Butterfield. the 
Faculty the Y. M. C. A. and the whole college have 
received you most cordially but that the Signal may 
publish the expressions of good will extended by the 



student body. You have begun a phase of your 
career that has more to do with the shaping of your 
future than any other influence. You have entered 
an active life teeming with opportunities to do things. 
It Is a life that chisels and shapes and polishes the 
Individual character and by the same process cements 
many individuals with like interests Into one grand 
democracy. If you are here for a purpose you will 
seize every opportunity and bend every energy from 
now on to fulfill your obligation to that purpose. If 
you have no well-defined goal in mind college life will 
discover your talents. Whatever your bent get into 
the game early and keep everlastingly at It. What 
you can do will be known by the end of the first 
semester. If you are here for fun, for an easy time 
and a pull you have called at the wrong door. P-u-l-l 
here spells "push." Do not flourish your bank 
account or jingle your coin. It will avail you little 
here The earnest, upright, square-dealer and per- 
sistent every-day worker has the respect of both fac- 
ulty and students. If you study all the time and for 
high marks alone you will be known as a grind. On 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






the other hand If you take a wide-awake, practical, 
healthful point of view of each lesson assigned and 
study for the sake of what there Is to learn you are 
preserving an attitude of teachableness. The more 
you learn, the more you find out that you do not 
know. Especially Is this true of the work done at M. 
A. C, since Nature's moods and methods are as 
illimitable and as indeterminate as the heavens are 
Infinite in extent. However to the ambitious this is 
but an incentive to bigger fields of study and enter- 
prise. Enter into the daily routine with a zest that 
will quite drive away the last trace of homesickness. 
Your classmates will catch your spirit and there will 
not be that atmosphere of unrest which occasionally 
pervades the Freshman camp. Learn to select your 
college chums with reserve. A choice hastily made 
is sometimes rued in years to come. Seek out the 
best men, the strongest men, those with personality, 
for your guides and companions. Link yourselves 
with all the good works about College. The evil 
takes care of itself but the good must be faithfully 
championed. Right here recurs the thought that was 
suggested at the beginning: Do things. It is a crude 
way of expressing a great need. Put in all the time 
you need for your personal advancement, then put a 
little more time than you have left into some of the 
enterprises of the undergraduate body. Athletics 
appeals to many, Y. M. C. A. work to altogether too 
few, journalistic work to even fewer. Do not be 
afraid that you will overburden these departments of 
work. Every man in College has something that 
can be used to advantage In maintaining the various 
sides of the life. As the willing laborers pour in new 
roads of endeavor will open. And, after all, the 
spirit of devotion to a good cause that calls for self- 
sacrifice and self-denial in a little college community, 
such as ours, does more than anything else to round 
out the college man and make him a useful member 
of society rather than an ornament and a burden. 



Athletic Notts- 



ROPE PULL POSTPONED. 

By vote of the Senate, the rope pull across the 
pond between the two lower classes, has been indefi- 
nitely postponed owing to the fact that the pond is 
practically dry. It was drained during the summer, 
and not enough rain has fallen since to fill it again. 
It is hoped that it will be possible to have the pull take 
place in the near future, as it is an event peculiar to 
this college, and of great interest to both students and 
townspeople. 



THE RHODE ISLAND GAME. 

The first football game of our schedule was played 
on the campus gridiron Saturday afternoon, Sept. 2, 
The score is unsettled and Walter Camp has been 
appealed to. According to the officials of the game, 
the score is 0-0. But the result of one play is in 
doubt. In the first half, Rhode Island's center passed 
the ball back for a punt but the fullback could not 
even get his hands on the ball, and aR. I. man fell on 
it back of their goal line. The officials pronounced It 
a touchback, but if Camp says it was a safety, the 
score will be 2-0 In our favor. 

The day was excessively warm and the field dry 
and dusty, so the halves were only 15 minutes long. 
Rhode Island has been out about a week longer than 
our men have, and played to win, putting up a good 
stiff game. M. A. C. gained yards on every exchange 
of punts, Schermerhorn showing up very well in this 
department. Blaney, Crossman, Morse, Crosby and 
Tully ran back kicks in good shape. Three penalties 
for offside were suffered by Rhode Island and one by 
M. A. C. Only three times-out were taken. 

Massachusetts started with the south for her goal. 
Blaney received the kickoff, and ran It back about 25 
yards. He made nine and seven, and Hosmer two 
fives through tackle. Turner lost five on an end run 
with 12 to go on a trick play. Schermerhorn punted, 
Tully was nailed in his tracks, and R. I. lost 5 for 
offside on their first play. Quinn made a small gain 
through right tackle. In passing the ball for a punt, 
Burgess passed too high, and a touchback or a safety 
resulted. R. I. punted out from the 25 yard line, 
Crosby received the ball, ran it back 20. Turner 
made two, Blaney three around left, Hosmer four 
through Aherns. The ball was lost on downs on R. 
I.'s 40 yard line. 

R. I. fumbled on the first play, but recovered it, 
made 5 through right tackle, punted to Crossman, 
who ran the ball back 30 yards. With the ball on our 
50 yard line, Blaney made two, Clancy made no gain 
around left, and Schermerhorn punted 50 yards, 
Tully returning the ball about 5 yards. Rhode Island 
tried but failed, and punted 35 yards to Crossman, 
who reeled off 20 before being downed. The next 



play resulted in a fumble, and the half ended with into a strong football machine. He has been forced 



|he ball in Rhode Island's possession in the middle of 

the field. 

Second half:— Rhode Island ran the kick-off back 
1 5 yards, Johnson making a pretty tackle. Qulnn 
giade nine yards, and two short gains. With four to 
go, Craig punted 45 to Mors'e, who replaced Clancy 
li this half. Morse brought the ball back 5. Blaney 
fiade no gain. Walker went in at right half, Hosmer 
Irtade 8, Crossman 4. No gain, punt fumbled by 
Tully, recovered by Turner. Turner made no gain 
ground end, Hosmer 5 through guard. The line was 
Opening nice holes during most of the second half. 
Irlorse tried an onside kick, but he kicked into line, and 
Miner recovered the ball for Rhode Island. Neal 
leplaced Crossman at left half. 

R. 1. lost 4. Craig made one at right end, punted 
Id Morse, who made a neat run of 30 yards. Hos- 
tler made 3, 6, and 0, and R. I. got the ball. They 
fegan to do things, getting, 5, 5 and 6 on the next 

tree plays. Quinn broke through for 15 yards, 

lorse making a nice tackle. This play was nullified 
\y the ball being brought back and a penalty of five 
lards Inflicted for offside. One more gain through 

jckle, and the game was over, the ball being on our 

|5 yard line. The line-up: 



ASSACHU SETTS. 

urner, (Capt.) I.e. 
rosby, l.t. 

ohnson. I.g., 
Iger. c. 

hermerhorn, r.g. 

xton, r.t. 
eonard, r.e. 
Clancy. Morse, l.h.b. 
Grossman, Neal. l.h.b. 
Jlaney, Walker, r.e.b, 
hosmer. f.b. 

Halves — 15 minutes. 



Rollins. Linesmen — French. 
Harris. 



RHODE ISLAND. 

r. e.. Soule, H. Smith 

r.t.. Mounts 

r.g., Aherns 

c, Barker, Burgess 

l.g.. Warner 

l.t.. Miner 

I.e.. Craig 

q.b., E. Smith 

r.h.b.. Tully 

l.h.b., Miller 

f.b.. Quinn 

Umpire — Carpenter. Referee — 

Slack. Timekeepers — Barry, 



to rush the practice faster than he wished because of 
the fact that the first game of the schedule comes 
earlier than usual. He is especially anxious not to 
break our string of victories over Rhode Island State. 
When the class of 1908 graduated they took with 
them an unusually large number of regulars. Cobb, 
with his kicking and generalship, is especially missed. 
He is, however, assisting in coaching the quarter- 
backs and kickers. Farley, Page and Anderson have 
left vacancies in the line, and Phllbrick in the back- 
field. As things now stand, there is about one good 
team of regulars, but very few good substitutes, so 
that accidents to the men will be especially hard to 
remedy. All, however, from Captain Turner down, 
are showing the old"Massachusetts"spirlt, so that we 
on the sidelines may confidently expect a season that 
will reflect glory on our college. 

The football schedule for 1908: 
Sept. 26— Rhode Island College at M. A. C. 
Oct. 3 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
Oct. 14 — University of Vermont at Burlington. 

17— Worcester P. I. at M. A. C. 

24 — Williams at Williamstown, 

31 — Yale at New Haven. 
7 — New Hampshire State at Manchester. 

14 — Springfield T. S. at Springfield 

21— Tufts at Medford. 



Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



THE FOOTBALL SITUATION. 

The present outlook for a successful season in foot- 
fall Is much improved over that of a week ago, but 
jven now the situation is not as rosy hued as it should 
or as It was last year at this time. Coach Bul- 
ick of Dartmouth is accomplishing wonders, and is 
1st rounding a mass of rather unpromising material 



CHANGES IN FOOTBALL RULES. 

The new football rules adopted by the intercollegiate 
rules committee present very few changes from those 
of last year. Most of the differences are unimport- 
ant, and no spectator who is not an expert at the 
game would be aware that this year's game is at all 
different from last year's. 

All penalties for fouls, except disqualification, may 
be declined by the offended side. The loss of the 
ball is the penalty for batting it forward. The field 
judge has charge of this. He is also the official 
timekeeper. 

If a man in receiving a forward pass fumble it, no 
other man on his side may touch the ball until an 
opponent has done so. Penalty for breaking this rule, 
loss of ball. The same penalty holds good for any 
illegal touching of the ball, but the place of losing the 
ball is the spot from which the pass was made, rather 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






than where the offense was committed, as was the 
case in the first mentioned rule. The use of the 
hands and arms is regulated. 

The use of four officials is recommended. They 
are referee, umpire, field judge, and head linesman. 
The Intermission between the halves has been 
lengthened to fifteen minutes. 

Time will be taken out during the enforcement of 
the penalty for an uncompleted forward pass. 

In case of forfeited games the score shall be 1-0, 

to distinguish the outcome of the game from others. 

If a kick or forward pass, except a try at goal. 

strikes the bar or uprights of the goal, it shall be con 

sidered as having crossed the goal line. 



Collect N°**S- 



E. Victor Bennett, ex-'09, died at Southern Pines, 
North Carolina, Friday, Sept. 18. 

It was decided by the senate to postpone indefin- 
itely the tug-of-war across the pond. 

R. H. Verbeck, '08, Thurston, '08, and Davis, 
*08, were visitors at college recently. 

Miss Cornelia Ball, secretary to the Division of 
Horticulture, has resigned her position. 

Professor and Mrs. C. E. Gordon have moved from 
their residence in North Amherst to Mill Valley. 

F. A. Johnson, '08. W. S. Regan. '08, and R. D. 
Whitmarsh are back for graduate work in entomology. 

Professor A. V. Osmun is building a house at the 
corner of Phillips street and Nutting avenue in Am- 
herst. 

Professor W. R. Hart has purchased the Baker 
house on Pleasant street and is making extensive 
improvements. 

The new fire escape on the Chemical Laboratory 
is completed to provide absolute safety to the stu- 
dents from fire. 

Professor W. R. Hart and Mr. E. H. Forristall 
lectured at the Hampshire Agricultural fair held in 
Amherst last week. 

At a recent meeting of the fraternity conference 
R. H. Allen, 1910, was elected chairman of the 
informal committee. 



At a recent meeting of the College Senate L. S. 
Corbett, 1909, and Louis A. Brandt, 1910, were 
elected cheer leaders. 

R. C. Llndblad, '09, has succeeded T. A. Barry, 
'08, as observer at the meteorological observatory 
of the Experiment Station. 

O. C. Bartlett, '09, was chosen president of the 
senate, W. R. Clark secretary and P. E. Alger vice- 
president at a recent meeting. 

E. C. Worman of Yale University was about 
college a few days. He is to succeed Hull as general 
secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

G. R. Cobb, '08, is back coaching the quarter- 
backs and assisting Coach Bullock with the other 
men. Coach Cobb is developing some punters on 
the team. 

Arthur D. Holmes, B. S., Dartmouth College. 
1904, who has been instructor in chemistry during 
the past year has resigned, and will go to Johns Hop- 
kins University as graduate student. 

The Senate has made a ruling to the effect that all 
Freshmen shall be required to wear a blue skull cap 
with a green button until Christmas. These caps ar* 
to be worn this year after October the first. 

Professor F. A. Waugh conducted a course of 
lectures at Cornell University Graduate School this 
summer. Dr. Charles Fernald, Philip Smith and 
several other men attended the session this summer. 
The Union was informally opened Saturday even- 
ing. Sept. 19, by a sing held in the assembly room. 
After the sing the trustees, the faculty and the under- 
graduate enterprises were represented in brief 

speeches. 

The graduate department offering courses for the 
degrees of master of science and doctor of philoso- 
phy has been reorganized under the direction of Prof. 
Charles H. Fernald who has been appointed head of 
the department. 

The class of 1912 has elected as officers;— Pres- 
ident, E. 1. Shaw; vice-president, D. G. Tower ; sec- 
retary and treasurer, Thomas Hemenway ; class cap- 
tain. H. C. Walker ; sergeant-at-arms, F. S. Merrill; 
historian, A. C. Brett. 

The class of 191 1 has chosen the following officers. 
President, J. F. Adams; vice-president, C. A. 



Smith ; secretary and treasurer, P. W. Allen ; cap- 
tain. C. M. Damon; sergeant-at-arms, R. L. Bar- 
rows ; historian, E. Larabee. 

The following have been constituted a Reading 
Board to assist the Department of English in correct- 
ing and criticising Freshman and Sophomore compo- 
sitions : G. M. Brown, C. H. White, H. L. White, 
'09; J. C. Folsom, S. W. Mendum, '10. 

The Freshmen succeeded in eluding the Sopho- 
mores on Monday morning. Sept. 21 , and had their 
pictures taken on the Chapel steps. The Sophomores 
did not realize what was going on until the photogra- 
pher who came In an automobile had vanished. 

The class of 1910 has chosen for the ensuing 
semester: President, L. S. McLaine; vice-presi- 
dent, H. A. Brooks; secretary and treasurer, F. L. 
Thomas ; class captain, Louis A. Brandt ; historian. 
W. E. Leonard; sergeant-at-arms, R. H. Allen. 

The class of 1909 has chosen the following officers 
for this semester: President, A. W. Hubbard; 
vice-president, George M. Brown, Jr. ; secretary, C. 
S. Putnam; treasurer. Robert D. Lull; historian, 
Myron F. Geer; captain, H. P. Crosby; sergeant-at- 
arms, F. Herbert Wilson, Jr. 

Professor Babson received a degree of Ph. D. 
from Harvard University last June and has accepted 
a position as Professor of German Languages and Lit- 
erature in the college of Hawaii at Honolulu. Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Babson left San Francisco on the 
1 5th of the month. The Signal wishes Professor 
Babson success in his new work. 

The sudden death this summer of W. W. Rawson 

at his home In Arlington deprives us of one of our 

trustees. He was much interested in the college 

and a staunch friend. His death is sincerely 

regretted by all who knew and were interested in him. 

Prof. E. A. White was one of the representatives of 

the faculty of the college at Mr. Rawson 's funeral. 

President Roosevelt has conferred an honor upon 

President Butterfield by appointing him a member of 

a commission of five, which is entrusted with duties 

which the president considers of great importance. 

The commission will make a thorough investigation of 

conditions governing rural life in America, with a view 

to bringing about a better social, sanitary and eco- 



nomic condition on American farms. The committee 
will embody its findings in a report to the president 
and the report with recommendations will be submitted 
by him in a special message to Congress. The other 
members of the commission are Prof. L. H. Bailey 
of the College of Agriculture of Cornell University, 
Henry Wallace of Wallace's Farmer of Des Moines, 
la., Gifford Pinchot of the United States forest 
reserve, and Walter H. Page of the World's Work of 
New York. 



FACULTY CHANGES. 

The faculty roll shows a total of thirty- seven in- 
structors. Ten new men have been added, some to 
succeed those resigned. others to assist in old and new 
lines of work. This was made possible by a special 
appropriation last spring. 

Professor W. P. Brooks has resigned as head of the 
Department of Agriculture to which he was called 
from Japan after the resignation of Professor Alvord 
and will devote himself wholly to the Experiment 
Station of which he is director. The Department of 
Agriculture, by vote of the trustees, has become a 
division, like the Division of Horticulture and the 
Division of Humanities. 

James A. Foord for the past year Associate Pro- 
fessor of Agronomy has been appointed Acting Head 
of the Division of Agriculture and Professor of Farm 
Administration. Professor Foord came to" Massachu- 
setts" a year ago after several years' experience in 
agricultural work. He is a man who spent much of 
his early life in practical work on New England farms, 
was graduated from the New Hampshire College of 
Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts in 1898, and then 
went to Cornell University for graduate study. He 
was soon appointed as assistant in the Cornell Ex- 
periment station and in 1902 received the degree of 
Master of Science in Agriculture from the University. 
He served as Associate Professor of Agronomy at the 
Ohio State University and as Professor of Agriculture 
in Delaware College. 

The Division of Agriculture now established at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College will mean the 
thorough organization of the agricultural interests of 
the college and will provide for efficient instruction in 
Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Farm 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 



it 



Administration. Every possible support will be given 
the division by the college administration in order to 
develop courses which shall thoroughly train students 



develop courses whicn snan inoruugmj ».... . r- Division of Agriculture at 

f0 r both practical and scientific **!!«K^J£iTS ■ 



and creamery practice, condensed milk manufacture, 
and creamery and condensary construction. His ap- 
pointment will not only materially strengthen the 

• • •— " the Col- 



Professor Foord has had unusual opportunities for 
study and research and is equipped with a thorough 
education in scientific and practical agriculture, and 
his theoretical training has been strengthened by 
years of successful service both in teaching and in 
the direction of practical enterprises; he is thus 
uniquely prepared to assume the responsibility of this 
new work, and his appointment signifies much to the 

present and future students of the college, and to the 

agricultural movements of the state. 

Sidney B. Haskell, after a year's leave of absence 

at the University of Leipsic, Germany, will resume 

his work as instructor in agriculture. The courses of 



lege, but will undoubtedly be of greater value to the 
dairymen and the dairy industry of the state. 

Charles R. Green of Hartford, Conn., has been 
appointed librarian to succeed Miss Hall. Mr. Green 
has been for the past seven or eight years Assistant 
Librarian in the State Library In the Capitol at Hart- 
ford and was highly recommended by many promi- 
nent people In official and public life who have had 
occasion to use the library, which is considered one 
of the finest law and historical reference libraries in 
the country. Mr. Green is about 30 years old and 
is a graduate of the Connecticut Agricultural College 
at Storrs, Conn. He Is also a very active member 



/ 



study will be revised and electives offered. New de- 
partments and other professors will be added to the 
division, as the increase of funds will permit. 

Dr. Percy L. Reynolds, graduate of Springfield 
Training School and Georgia Medical College is to 
be Physical Director and Professor of Hygiene and 
Physical culture. During the past two years he has 
been instructor in Physical Education in the Univer- 
sity of Maine, where he has had exceptional success 
in organizing interclass and interfraternity athletic 
contests. He is an all-round athlete, and is particu- 
larly strong in track sports. This new department at 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College was decided 
upon at the last regular meeting of the trustees. It 
is part of President Butterfield's plan to gradually 
build up the gymnastic and field athletics in the col- 
lege to as high a standard as is now enjoyed by the 
football and baseball teams. 

W. P. Lockwood has been appointed Assistant 
Professor of Dairying in the College and will begin 
his work about October 1 . Professor Lockwood was 
graduated from the Pennsylvania State College with 
the class of 1899, and has been closely associated 
with the dairy industry ever since. He returned to 
his alma mater as a teacher, but has spent most of 
his time since leaving college in the supervision of 
some branch of the actual business of dairying. His 
commercial experience in this line of effort has been 
a broad one and has brought him in touch with the 
real problems pertaining to city milk supply, dairy 



A. C. By his appointment Mr. 
member of the faculty of the 



of the Alumni of C. 
Green becomes a 
College. 

Prof. B. F. Jenks of Goshen, lnd., has accepted a 
position in the College as Instructor in Agricultural 
Education. He will be an assistant to Professor 
Hart and his work will consist largely In helping to 
introduce teaching of Agriculture Into the Gram- 
mar and High schools throughout the state. He 
will be free to counsel with teachers and superinten- 
dents who contemplate the putting in of Agricultural 
courses, and if desired can assist in the supervision 
of the work to some degree. Quite a part of his 
time will be given to co-operative work, by which he 
goes to North Adams Normal School, where he will 
give instructions in agriculture and aid In the starting 
of agricultural education in the secondary schools of 
that part of the state. 

Professor Jenks is a graduate of Purdue. In the 
class of 1 898. Besides managing a farm, he has 
taught in district schools and high schools, the last 
three years having been in the Goshen high school, 
one of the best in the state, where he taught science 
and agriculture. Professor Jenks comes to the Col- 
lege highly recommended by President Stone of 
Purdue, who is a graduate of Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Dr. Alexander E. Cance has been appointed In- 
structor in Agricultural Economics. He received his 
master's degree in education and economics from the 



University of Wisconsin and has just received his 
doctor's degree from the same institution specializing 
in economics and agriculture. Dr. Cance has had 
much practical experience In farm life and teach- 
ing in high schools and colleges. He comes to 
Amherst highly recommended by Prof. Richard T. 
Ely, by Dr. H. C. Taylor and other men of well- 
known standing. In addition to giving instruction In 
agriculture and economics In the College, he will 
devote considerable time to research work to ascer- 
tain the industrial conditions of agriculture in this 
state. His researches will be of value to President 
Butterfield in his work on the commission appointed 
by President Roosevelt to advise him regarding 
action to be recommended in a message to Congress 
for the betterment of the farmers of the United 
States. 

The Department of Modern Languages has a new 
instructor in German. Edgar L. Ashley, a complete 
account of whom was given in the Signal May 6, 
1908. Mr. Ashley was graduated from Brown 
University with the degree of A. B. in 1903, and of 
A. M. in 1904. He was Instructor In German for 
three years In Brown after which he spent one year 
abroad. The past year he has had entire charge of 
the German Department of Bates College, with 200 
students under him and has given complete satisfac- 
tion. 

A new instructor in French and Spanish has been 
elected and Anderson McKimmie of Princeton Is the 
appointee. 

C. R. Duncan, Rutgers, has been added to the 
teaching force of the Department of Mathematics 
and Physics. 

L. S. Shaw, University of Syracuse, succeeds 
William M. Thornton, Jr., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Harry M. Jennison, '08, succeeds Earle G. Bart- 
lett, '07, Instructor in Botany. 

The position of Secretary to the President made 
vacant by the resignation of Miss Grace M. Knowles, 
who had served in that capacity for the past two 
years, has been filled by the appointment of Ralph J. 
Watts, a graduate of the College, class of 1907. 

The position of Correspondence Clerk to the 
President and to the Dean and Registrar has been 
filled by the appointment of Miss Clara L. Stuart of 
Boston. 



THE COLLEGE BARN FIRE. 

The big, new hay barn erected on the sight of the 
one burned in 1906 was totally destroyed by fire on 
the morning of August 15. Hundreds of tons of hay, 
the farming tools stored in the cellar, the Ayrshire 
bull and Guernsey bull and 1 1 calves were burned. 
The stable and dairy rooms of the south wing, thanks 
to the fire-proof wall of 12-inch hollow concrete blocks 
were uninjured. The wall stands, a monument to 
this mode of construction. The concrete silos on the 
north side of the hay barn likewise withstood the 
onslaught of the flames and with the exception of the 
burning of the roofs are practically intact. 

The total loss is but little over $26,500. This 
conservative estimate is reached by valuing the main 
barn at $19,000. the feed and farming tools $6,500 
and live stock $1,000. There Is no insurance 
on the property as the state does not make It a 
practice of insuring public buildings. 

The state fire Inspector, George F. Crittenden, 
and detectives have been Investigating the circum- 
stances connected with the fire but not the slightest 
clew as to its cause can be discovered. An inquest 
was held September 21 and the decision was 
reached that the fire was caused by some Inside in- 
fluence and not by an act of incendiarism as first 
suggested. The inquest was held by the chief fire 
inspector of the state, C. Frank Rice, State Fire In- 
spector George Crittenden, Stenographer John I. 
Adams, H. D. Holland, chief of the Amherst fire 
department, and Deputy Sheriff D. H. Tillson. 
Among the twenty witnesses examined were President 
Kenyon L. Butterfield, Prof. William P. Brooks, 
Professor Foord. Superintendent Forestall and the 
Geer brothers, '09. who were rooming in the barn at 
the time of the fire. The evidence was gone into 
very thoroughly and while the cause was put down as 
unknown the fire was attributed to three causes- 
poorly insulated electric wires, spontaneous combustion 
of hay, or rats and matches. The insulation was 
perfect according to all knowledge. Superintendent 
Forrlstall testified that within a week or two of the 
time of the fire hay had been cut and stowed the 
same day. Yet it is said that there arises from 
heating hay a peculiar odor long before It reaches 
the point of ignition. 
I Before the fire had been fully extinguished Presi- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*___ J 1 u.v AUtluni^nnirT^^ the managers 

dent Buttered called a ™etlng o< *e ^ ^ ^ president Butter . 

,„ the early P«' ol October__ j THETA PH • ^ ^ ^ 

REB OV*T.O» OK KORTH COLLECT ^ ^JT^ - — - * 

North College hasten thoroughly '— J^Ulnnlng of Comm.ncem.nt, June. "08. 
,„g Ik. summer. Metal ceilings »* ^J* ambers are; 
Jors have been put »«<£-» " "£* 



"Jm Tbls is known as the Social Union room or 



GRADUATE. 

08— Paul A. Davis. 

UNDERGRADUATES. 

09-B. F. Barnes, jr.. C. S. Putnam. 



ways on tne ww« y . room or Bar Jr ., C . S. Putnam. 

mom This s known as the social u> .^.jI uy ' „ • r Railev H. T. Cowles, R 

i.Mv the "Union" and has been furnished D E< B alley, J. C. Bailey, n. 

more popularly the union T. , ptsk S. W. Mendum. F. P. Nlckiess 

. _,..,^ e»«u with tables and chairs, me v- J. Hsk, o. w 






TmlssTon^ « wlth tables and chairs. TfceQ.T. 
V " atnlty has been assigned the rooms on the 
1! floor between the hall-ways. The lava.or.e 

3TJE have be.n V***"*" £^2 
«,h«re new fixtures have been Installed. There win 
I tve^l shower-baths. In the basemen, also 
tmTh ve been partitioned o« to accommodate he 
rooms n* attendance, the 



,. Flsk,S.W. Mendum. F.PNlckless 
M . Brown, W. F. Henry, G. B. Merrill. 
R. H. Patch, W. R. Phipps- 






RESOLUTIONS. 



j r*A in His infinite wisdom to take 



' c r;s7orr::d=rise,na,,e^ 

College Barber Shop In charge of C. H. White, wr,i 
uouegc d H*»tftrmined. Full 



cemented pits without, thus secur- ^^J^Z**,. £ College MM. 
The rooms at the northwest and and that » copy * ^ g ^^ 
of *« lower floor wl.h smaller „ P c.% 



Zrth windows have been placed In the north side of 

heCmen. with cemented pits without, thus secu, 

Z, more light. The rooms at the northwest and 

Is adjoining each have received the sarr, j trea 
ment as the Union. According to present arrange- 
2 1 the northeast room w..l be used as a general 
committee room by all the undergraduate organ a^ 
tlons and will probably be furnished wl.h a committee 
able and chairs by the Union. The smaller room In 
the rear of this Is reserved for the Signal and Index 
„ a private office. This will be furnished by these 
hoards The room on the south of the east entry Is 
to be used by th. French and German Instructors 
while Dr. Reynolds will have the small room adjoin- 
... -ru_ T.«rvh« Pnnm will be head- 

ing for an office. 



Resolved. That we. tne ..»»— h 

„tend to his family our sincere sympathy in this 
of sorrow, and be it further ^ sent t0 th , 

bereavea ian j ._-, .„ ,u. c iu ec Signal. 



For the Class. 



NOTICE I9» 2 

SENATE RULES. 

, As a mark of respect all students are expected 
to recognize the members of the Faculty by the «* 

^2 'lhat in addition the members of the Freshm* 

Class shall when on the college grounds recogn.* 

me members of the SenlorClass in the same mann, 

I 3 Freshmen shall not be permitted to smoke » 

, will have the small room adjoin- 3. * res ™ h u own roorn s until the 

The Trophy Room will be head- the college grounds save 



have defeated the Sophomores in some regular 
athletic contest. 

4. Students are expected to dress neatly and 
decently at all times and no student shall be permitted 
to appear on the campus during an athletic contest or 
at the dining hall, or on other college exercises clad 
in overalls, jumpers or other similar unconventional 

attire. 

5. Military uniforms or portions of the same shall 
not be worn by individuals outside of the college 
grounds except to or from drill. 

6. Should the Freshman Class lose the tug-of- 
war, the Sophomore Class shall be at liberty to con- 
fiscate all Freshman Class banners displayed by that 
class either in their rooms or on the campus during 
their Freshman year at college. 

7. No student shall wear any preparatory school 
letters or numerals either on caps', jerseys, or sweat- 
ers while on the campus. 

8. The Freshman Class banquet shall be held on or 
between April 1 9 and June 1 . The Sophomores shall 
create no disturbance in another town in trying to break 
up the banquet. A breach of the peace shall be con- 
sidered a disturbance. If the Sophomores prevent 
the Freshman class president or any other three class 
officers from attending the banquet it shall not be 
considered successful. The Freshman Class must 
give a sealed list of the names of the class officers to 
the president of the Senate to be opened <n the pres- 
ence of the Senate. This list must be handed In 
before April 19. 

9. Between Oct. 1 and the Christmas vacation 
inclusive Freshmen shall appear at all times while In 
the limits of the town of Amherst wearing the pre- 
scribed Freshman cap. The said cap shall consist of 
a black skull cap with a one and one-half Inch green 

button. 

Signed : 

0. C. Bartlett, Pres. 

W. R. Clarke, Sec. 



Oct. 6. 



Oct. 7. 



Oct. 4. Bible Study. 4 00 p. m. Vespers under 
the auspices of the Y.M.CA. Speaker, 
President K. L. Butterfield. Chapel 
5-00 p. m. 
Stockbrldge Club 7-00 p. m. Agricultural 
Lecture Room. Discussion. Subject: 
Agricultural Fair. 
Assembly. Speaker, Horatio Knox of 
Providence, R. I., at 1-30 p. m. 

Oct. 8. Y. M. C. A. 7-00 p. m. Speaker, E. C. 
Worman. State College Secretary. 
Chapel. 

Oct. 11. Vespers under the auspices of the Y. M. 
C. A. 5-00 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker. 
Rev. JohnC. Breaker of Northampton. 

Oct. 13. Stockbrldge Club Meeting. 7-OO.p.m., In the 
Agricultural Lecture Room. Discussion. 

Oct. 14. Football, M. A. C. vs. University of Ver- 
mont at Burlington, Vt. Assembly at 
1-30 P. m. in Chapel. Class Talks. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Oct. 1. Y. M. C. A. 7-00 p. m. Speaker, Ora S. 
Gray. 

Oct. 2. "College Night." at 6-00 p. m. 

Oct. 3. Football, M. A. C. vs. Dartmouth at Han- 
over, N. H. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 1912. 

Ackerman, Arthur John 

82 Pleasant St. 

Beers, Rowland Trowbridge 

Hatch Barn. 

Bent, William Richard 

East Pleasant St. 

Blrdsall, Webster Jennings 

58 Pleasant St. 

Bodflsh, Edward Hill 

6 Allen St. 

Boland, Eric Nichols 

9 Fearing St. 

Brett. Alden Chase 

88 Pleasant St 

Brown. Merle Raymond 

60 College St. 

Burr, Frederick Huntington 

Fearing St. 

Cabot, George Dwight 

75 Pleasant St. 

Caldwell, Lawrence Sanborn 

3 McClelian St. 



Campbell, Clare Avery 

35 East Pleasant St 



Carpenter. Jesse 

25 Pleasant St. 

Castle, Fred Arlo 

1 16 Pleasant St. 

Clancy, Eugene Francis South Hadley Falls 



Worcester 
Blllerica 
Marlboro 
Otego. N. Y. 
West Barnstable 
South Boston 
North Ablngton 
Greenwich Village 
Ringville 
Winchester 
Lynn 
Boston 
Attleboro 
Seattle, Wash. 



IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



it 



Westhampton 
Boston 
Boston 
Marlboro 
Ostervllle 
Amherst 
Worcester 



Claop, Raymond Kingsley 

vy Forristall's. 

Cohen, Harold 

96 Pleasant St. 

Covllle. Joseph Warren 

9 Fearing St. 

Curran, Daniel Joseph 

East Pleasant St 

Daniel, Edward Stephen Coen 
6 Allen St. 

Deady, James E. 

2 North East St 

Dee, J. Francis 

96 Pleasant St. 

Demlng. W.nfred G. Weathersfield. Conn. 

75 Pleasant St. 

Dodge, Albert Wesley ^.nham 

88 Pleasant St. 

Eastman, Edward Baxter, Jr. North Amherst 

Eisenhause, John Louis North Reading 

Thompson House. 

Ells, Gordon W. 

Mrs. Fltts . 

Ellsworth, Henry Bradford 

Holyoke. 

Faeerstrom, Leon Emanuel 

82 Pleasant St. 

Ftnnegan, John Thomas 

66 Pleasant St. 

Flsherdlck, Warren Francis, 
Fltts, Frank Orus 
Fitzgerald, John Joseph 

96 Pleasant St. 

Folger, Ernest Maynard 

Fearing St. 

Fowler, George Scott 

44 Pleasant St. 

Frost, Newton John 

77 Pleasant St 

Cellck. George BuHa.o. N. Y. 

47 Pleasant St. 
Gasklll. Lewis Warren Hopedale 

Mr. Goldberg's. 
Gelinas, Louis Edmond North Adams 

Hamilton St. 
Gtbbs. Robert Morey Chester 

Mrs. Fitts . 

Gibson, Lester Earl , Melrose Highlands 

Mrs. Fltts . 

Goldberg, George Boston 

112 Pleasant St. 



Cambridge 

Holyoke 

Worcester 

Jamaica Plain 

Amherst 

North Amherst 

Holyoke 

Brockton 

Wayland 

Natick 

North Wilmington 



Gray, Frank Leonard 

44 Triangle St. 

Hall, Ralph Sawyer 

82 Pleasant St. 

Hamilton, Percy 

II McClellan St. 

Harlow, Joseph Alvin 

75 Pleasant St. 

Heald. Jay Morrill 

11 McClellan St. 

Heatley, David Buchanan 

1 16 Pleasant St. 

Hemenway, Thomas 

75 Pleasant St. 

Hlckey, Frank B. 

East Pleasant St. 

Hills, Frank Burrows, 

77 Pleasant St. 

Hiltpold, Werner 

35 East Pleasant St. 

Holland, Henry L. 

28 North Prospect St 

Hutchlngs. Herbert Colby 

Mr. Forristall's. 

Kingsbury. A. F. 

Lamson, Robert Ward 

109 Main St. 

Lloyd. Edward Russell 

Mrs. Fltts'. 

Lundgren, Arthur Robert 

88 Pleasant St. 

McGarr, Thomas A. 

Mrs. Fltts*. 

McLean, John Robert 

60 Pleasant St. 

Martin, James Francis 

19 South East St. 

Maxon, Donald Charles 

25 Sunset Ave. 

Messer, Alan Irving 
Merkle, George Edward 

North East St. 

Merrill. Fred Sawyer, 
Muiler. Alfred Frederick 

88 Pleasant St. 
Moreau, Theodore Joseph 

75 Pleasant St. 

N orris, Edward J. 

96 Pleasant St. 

Noyes, Harry Alfred 

88 Pleasant St. 



East Boston 

Sturbrldge 

Cumberland 

Turners Falls 

Watertown 

Fall River 

Winchester 

Brockton 

Bernardston 

Easthampton 

Amherst 

South Amherst 

Medfield 
Amherst 

Stow 

Orange 

Worcester 

Medford 

Amherst 

Elkhart, Ind. 

Plttsfleld 
Amherst 

Danvers 
Jamaica Plain 

Turners Falls 

Somerville 

Marlboro 



Worcester 
Llttlefalls, N. Y. 
Amherst 
Arlington 
Clifford 
Taunton 
Williamsburg 
New York, N. Y. 
Lowell 



O'Flynn, George B. 

96 Pleasant St. 

Oppel. Eugene Irving 

82 Pleasant St. 

Parker. Ralph Robinson 

60 Pleasant St. 

Pearson, Charles Cornish 

96 Pleasant St. 

Peckham. Curtis 

Mr. Green's. 

Philbrick. William Edwin 

96 Pleasant St. 

Pierpont, John E. 

96 Pleasant St. 

Post, George Atwell 

Hadley. 

Pratt. Marshall Cotting 

88 Pleasant St. 

Puffer, Stephen Perry 
Raymond, Arthur Nathaniel 

88 Pleasant St. 

Reed, Robert Edward 

88 Pleasant St. 

Roberts, Clarence Dwtght New Haven, Conn. 

82 Pleasant St. 
Robinson, Earle J. H Ingham 

116 Pleasant St. 
Rockwood, Lawrence Peck Waterbury, Conn. 

116 Pleasant St. 

Sanctuary, William Crocker Amherst 

147 South Pleasant St. 

Sellew, Lewis Raymond 

77 Pleasant St. 

Shaw, Ezra Ingram 

8 Spaulding St. 

Sheehan, Dennis Anthony 

31 East Pleasant St 

Smith, Harrison Edward 

96 Pleasant St. 



North Amherst 
Leominster 

Ablngton 



Tupper, George Wilbur 

96 Pleasant St. 

Turner, Howard Archibald 

East Pleasant St. 

Wales. Robert Webster 

88 Pleasant St. 

Walker, Herman C. 

77 Pleasant St. 

Warner, Roger Andrew 

Mr. Forristall's 

Whitney, Charles Everett 

Mrs. Fitts' 

Wilbur, Emory Sherman 

Thompson House 

Wilde, Earle Irving 

96 Pleasant St. 

Williams, Edward R. 

1 16 Pleasant St. 

Williams, Silas 

Mr. Goldberg's. 

Wood, Howard Holmes 

10 Allen St. 



Young, Edwin Burnham 

35 East Pleasant St 



Roxbury 
Dorchester 
North Ablngton 
Marlboro 
Sunderland 
Wakefield 
East Wareham 
Taunton 
Concord 
Fall River 
Shelburne Falls 
Dorchester 



The following were admitted to advanced standing: 

1910. 



Southwlck, Benjamin G. 

Mrs. Fltts' 

Springer, Isaac 

112 Pleasant St. 

Stack, Herbert James 

Tong, Ylng Hee 

31 East Pleasant St. 

Torrey, Ray E. North Leverett 

North Amherst 



Natick 

Amherst 

South Lincoln 

Medford 

Buckland 

Boston 

Amherst 
China 



Tower, Daniel Gordon 

96 Pleasant St. 

Tucker, John W. 

Mrs. Fltts'. 



Roxbury 
Worcester 



Hosmer, Charles Irwin 

101 Pleasant St. 

Roy. Miss Callsta G. 

97 Pleasant St. 

1911. 

Warren, Edward Erving 

82 Pleasant St. 

Creldenberg. Julius 

12 Pleasant St. 

Winn, Erwln Lawrence 

96 Pleasant St. 

Graduate Students. 

M. A. C. '08. 

Regan, W. S. 

84 Pleasant St. 

Johnson, F. A. 

84 Pleasant St St. 

Whltmarsh, R. D. 

88 Pleasant St. 

Thurston, F. E. 

56 Pleasant St. 

Bouquet, Arthur G. B. 
Bourne, A. J. Dartmouth, '07. 



Turners Falls 
Watertown 

Leicester 
Revere 
Holden 



Northampton 

Westford 

Amherst 

Worcester 

Oregon 






: 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



it 







THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




Y. M. C- A - N<>*es. 



l^^Tw^T^ssociation started off with a ^ 
ccption tendered the new men on the first Friday 
after college opened and was followed by a Y. M. <- 
A RaMy on Sunday the 20»h. The speakers at the 
RaUv were President Butterfield, Professor Tyler of 
Rally were irres. Re ^ olds a nd Dean Mills. 

i.TorTheadte^es^ere^rvital interest to college 
"T new form of membership ticket has been pro- 

L",eady more than half their numbe, have reg, S ,ered 
arreauy mu executive committee have 

for membership. The executive stu dent 

decided to make a canvass of the entire student 

^The Bible Study canvass is being carried on and 
classes will begin their study on Sunday Four 
££. will be taken up this year in systematic s * jdy . 

The main meeting this year will be held on Sunday. 
The usuafThursdaynight meeting will take the form 
of a prayer and business meeting. 

The Officers and Committees for 'he ensuing yea, 
are% .onowS w -C. H White Pres, R D U». 

STSSi W A. wS^Treas. , R. J. Waits, 

Auditor. 

Committees. 
Advisory —Pres. K. L. Butterfield, Dean G. F. 
Mite P?of. W. R. Hart. Mr. R. J- Watts. Musical 
_L Brandt, H. P. Crosby, P. W. Alien. Member 
ship:-R. J. Watts. G. M. Brown. Devotional 



Bishop was employed In the Division of Horticulture 
for a few months two years ago and is very pleasantly 
remembered by the older students in college. 

.•Crops is fine thank you!" Farmer Books Is 
harvesting an excellent crop of potatoes, farmers 
Waugh and Sears are shipping squash by the carload, 
and farmer Gaskill has a fine crop of Baldwin apples 
on his farm, while Dr. Paige and other poultry farm- 
ers of the faculty are competing for prizes at the 
Amherst fair. 

EAST EXPERIMENT STATION. 
The station has just issued a bulletin which every 
bee-keeper in the state should have. It appears, as a 
result of a careful investigation by the author of the 
bulletin. Burton N. Gates, expert in apiculture 
United States department of agriculture, that two of 
the worst diseases which are known to affect bees are 
widely prevalent throughout the state. The bulletin 
shows the localities in which these diseases are known 
to be prevalent, and briefly describes a method of 
treatment, fortunately comparatively easy, which will 
insure their eradication. Every beekeeper who has 
not already received a copy should send for the bul- 
letin, addressing Massachusetts Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, Amherst. 

WEST EXPERIMENT STATION. 
Dept. of Plant and Animal Chemistry. 
Several lines of work are In progress at the present 
time. The research chemists are studying 



methods in the determination of butter fat 
S. W. Mendum^H.^^ more closely the composition of the 

M. own, u. u Kxr Vrttnrh DuU er fat molecule. 



Clarke. F. Haynes. Reception j^"'**** 
R. C. Lindblad. A. W. Holland, H. H. Howe. 
Librarian, R. N. Patch. 



D*p&rtmtn4T f4ot*s. 



Feed Division Mr. Smith is busy with his 
fall collection. The inspector, Mr. Hepburn, is can- 
vasing the states and the samples collected are being 
examined as rapidly as possible. Mr Haskins has 
Santlally completed the analysis of commercjl 
fertilizers and Is nearly ready to prepare the results 
for publication. 

Mr P V Goldsmith has been making a study of 
the nature of the coloring matter employed in guten 



DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE. 
C S Pomeroy experimentalist of the Division of 
Horticulture has been appointed to an excellent posi- n ;e nauu. ». ^JE^U^ "#*!■■ P«^nt 
tion in the penological work of the U. S. Departmen feed ^f^ ^ ^J received a numb er c 



of Agriculture. He will be employed for the present 
on the California fruit shipments and will be asso- 
ciated with H. M. White. M. A. C, '04. 

Mr. G. A. Bishop of Waltham will have charge of 
Professor White's classes for the present. Mr. 



feed as wen as ui mc M u»..v. v — --- r - - • 
The department has recently rece.ved a number of 
valuable books for use In connec ^n ^thUswork 
including-Benedicfs "Analysze der Lette. Blythes 
-Food Analysis," the recent edition of Hammersten s 
• •Physiological Chemistry" and ^ Hill's "Recent 
Advances in Biological Chemistry." 



Alumni. 



The following alumni registered at the last com- 
mencement: 

FOUR-YEAR MEN. 

71_R. W. Lyman. L. B. Caswell. H. L. Cowles. 
'73— W. S. Leland. J. B. Minor. S. S. Warner. 

Ex. F. K. Barrows. 
75— J. F. Barrett. 
76— W. H. Porter. 
78— D. E. Baker, C. F. Lyman, Lockwood Myrlck, 

H. F. Hubbard. 
79— G. P. Smith. 

•81— J. L. Hills, E. D. Howe, Austin Peters. 
'82— C. E. Beach, S. C. Damon. J. B. Paige, L. 

R. Taft, Ex. H. A. Parsons. 
'83— E. A. Bishop, S. M. Holman, C. W. Minott, 

H. J. Wheeler. 
-87—W. H- Caldwell, F. H. Fowler. 
'88— H. C. Bliss. E. H. Dickinson, G. E. Newman. 
-90— David Barry, H. D. Haskins. A. C. McCloud. 

F. O. Williams. 
'91 — W. A. Brown. 
'92— A. T. Beals. E. B. Holland, C. M. Hubbard. 

H. M. Thomson. M. H. Williams. 
•93_F. G. Bartlett, H. D. Clark, C. A. Goodrich, 
H. J, Harlow, F. H. Henderson. F. A. 
Smith, L. W. Smith. 
'94— E. H. Alderman, C. L. Brown. S. F.Howard, 
A. J. Morse. 

'95 H. D. Hemenway, E. A. White. 

E x -'96— F. P. Washburn. 

•97_p. H. Smith. 

•98— C. G. Clark, J. S. Eaton, A. J. Montgomery. 

J. P. Nickerson. 
>99_G. C. Hubbard. 
•01— C. E. Gordon. 
'02— R. W. Morse. 
'03— S. C. Bacon, G. L. Barrus, J. G. Cook, L. 

F. Harvey, G. D. Jones, A. V. Osmun. 
'04— A. W. Gilbert. 

•05— H. D. Crosby, Miss E. C. Cushman, J. F. 
Lyman. G. W. Patch. W. M. Sears, S. 
A. N. Swain, H. F. Tompson, B. Tupper, 
L. S. Walker. C. L. Whitaker, G. N. 
Willis. Ex. E. C. Bruce, A. R. Paul. 
-06— R. Wellington. C. W. Carpenter. F. C. Pray, 
A. W. Hall, Jr. 



Bean. W. H. 



•07— A. H. Armstrong, E. G. Bartlett, G. H. Chap- 
man, W. E. Dickinson, J. F. Eastman, 
J. 0. Chapman, A. A. Hartford, A. W. 
Higgins. Miss S. D. Livers, C. M. Parker, 
F. C. Peters, J. N. Summers, E. H. 
Shaw, J. H. Walker. 

Ex- '09— W. E. Adams. T. W. 
Learned, A. D.Lyman. 

E X . '10 — Miss Marjorie Lambert. 

TWO-YEAR MEN. 

'96— J. A. Davis, R. P. Coleman. 
»97_H. S. Ashley. 

SHORT-COURSE MEN. 

•95_H. R. Sherman, F. A. Tlsdale. 



Ex- '75.— J. C. Dlx. Lancaster. 

76. F. C. Deuel spent his vacation In Maine and 

returned much Improved In health. 

•90.— Fred J. Smith, change of address. % Pierce 
Phosphate Co., Lakeland, Fla. Mr. Smith, who 
was formerly chemist of the Bowker Insecticide Co., 
visited college last summer. Owing to the 
burning of this company last spring Mr. Smith has 
been transferred to Florida where he will establish a 
laboratory connected with the mining of phosphate 

rock. 

•90.— C. H. Jones recently visited Ottawa. Can. 

where he annually serves as a judge of maple sugar. 

•92. _J. E. Deuel spent his vacation at Horse's 
Neck Beach. 

»9 2< __G. E. Taylor of Shelburne visited the college 

and station recently. 

•93._Dr. E. H. Lehnert has accepted an Instruct- 
orship In Smith's Agricultural School and Northamp- 
ton School of Technology. He will teach chemistry 
and physics, veterinary science and bacteriology. 

'95.— Born on June 27, to Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
L. Morse, a daughter. Augusta Harrison. 

»95._p ro f. E. A. White is ill at his home. He 
was operated upon for appendicitis and Is reported as 

improving. 

'98.— Born, Sept. 4, to Mr. and Mrs. S. W. 
Wiley of Baltimore, a son, Samuel W. 

»99._W. A. Hooker for several yeirs special 
field agent of the U.S. department of agriculture, 
with headquarters at Dallas, Tex. has received an 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



15 



u 







appointment on the editorial staff of the Experiment 
Station Record. After the first of October Mr. and 
Mrs. Hooker will make their home in Washington, 

D. C. 

'00 —J- E - Halllgan of Baton Rouge, La.. attended 
the fifth annual meeting of the Louisiana State Hor- 
ticultural Society, and delivered a very interesting 
address on fertilizers. 

•04 —S. B. Haskell has returned from a year's 
study in Germany and has resumed his duties In the 
Agricultural department. 

Ex- '04.— S. A. Graves, 733 Asylum Ave.. Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Ex *05.— C. E. Merrill, Jr., Melrose. 
•06.— D. F. Carey has just gone to California to 
take a position as gardener on a large estate. 

•06 -Married, Sept. 19, Miss Ella Frances Hall 
and Fry Civllle Pray. Mr. and Mrs. Pray have left 
for Cuba where Mr. Pray Is employed as head chem- 
ist for a large sugar refinery. 

'06.— H.B.Fller. Park Commissioner, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Ex- '06.— S. F. Morse, 5 East 42d St., New York. 

• 7. _W. E. Dickinson, Shotover Inn, Hamilton 
City Cal. Mr. Dickinson Is engaged in the beet 
sugar industry, the season for which closes in Novem- 
ber or December. He will then return to Cuba. 



•07.— Married, Aug. 12, Miss Grace M. Knowles 
and Earle G. Bartlett. Mr. Bartlett has accepted a 
position as Instructor In the Kamehameha school. 
Honolulu, Hawaii, 

'07.— M. H. Clarke, Park Commissioner, Buffalo, 

N. Y. 

•08.— Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Farrar of Amherst 
have announced the marriage engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Mabel K. Farrar. to Samuel J. 
Wright of Marlboro. 

Ex . -09. —Died at Southern Pines. N. C. Friday 
the 18th of September, E. Victor Bennett. 

The following alumni visited the College during 
the summer : C. S. Crocker. '89; F. W. Mossman. 
•90- A H. Klrkland, '94 ; G. A. Billings, '95; M. 
E Sellew, '96; George Drew, '97 ; W. E. Hinds, 
■99. p C. Brooks, '01; H. L. Knight, '02; E. 
G. Proulx, W. E. Tottlngham, '03 ; S. R. Parker. 
'04, returned from Honolulu. 



CLASS OF 1908. 

J. A. HYSLOP, SECRETARY. WASHINGTON, D. C 

The addresses of the class of 1908 are reported 

as follows: 

Alley. Harold, Osslnlng-on- Hudson, N. Y., Com- 
mandant of Military Academy. 
Allen, C. F., Agent U. S. Bureau of Immigration. 

New York City. 
Anderson, A. J., Tree Work, Newark. N. J. 
Anderson, K. F., Roslindale. 
Bailey, E. W., Fellowship In University of Illinois. 
Bangs.' B. W., American Agricultural Chemical Co., 

Carteret, N. J. 
Barry, T. A., Amherst Electric Light Co. 
Bartholomew. Miss Persls, Westboro. 
Bates, Carlton, 205 D St., N. W. Washington, D.C. 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. Bureau of 
Chemistry, Scientific Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Chapman, L. W., Chemist, Coe-Mortlmer Co., 

Moosic. Pa. 
Chase, H. C. Sutton Ave , Swampscott. 
Clark, 0. L., Ethical Culture School, New York 

City. 
Cobb, G. R., Plerson. Cromwell, Conn. 
Coleman, W. J., 38 Orchard St.. Newark, N. J.. 

City Forester. 
Cummlngs, W. A., 200 Tremont St., Chicago, 111., 

Park Forester, Lincoln Park. 
Cutting, R. E., Salesman, Quaker Oats Co. 
Daniel, John, Field Agent, Experiment Station, Dur- 
ham, N. H. 
Davenport. S. L., Fruit Farmer. North Grafton. 
Davis, P. A., Instructor in Sciences, Dover High 

School, Dover, N. J. 
Dolan, Clifford, Dairyman, Putney, Vt. 
Eastman, P. M.. with J. T. Withers. Landscape 
Gardener, I Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J. 
Edwards, F. L., Farm Superintendent, Lee. 
Farley, A. J., Assistant Horticulturist, State Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, New Brunswick, 

N. J. 
Farrar, P. W., 83 Harvard St., Springfield, Assist- 
ant, City Engineer's Office. 
Flint, C. L., Metropoliian Park Commission, Milton. 
Glllett. C. S., Southwlck. 
I Gillett. K. E.. Nurseryman. Southwlck. 
iGowdey, B. C, 28 Albion St., Melrose Highlands, 



Gypsy Moth Commission. 

Hayes. H. K., Tarrlffville, Conn., U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry. 

Howe, W. L., Marlboro. 

Hutchlngs, Instructor In Physics and Chemistry in 
South Manchester High School, Conn. 

Hyslop, J. A.. 205 D St. N. W., Washington, D.C, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of 
Entomology, Investigating Expert in Food and 
Forage. 

Jackson, R. H.. Amherst. 

Jennlson, H. M., Instructor In Botany. M. A. C. 

Johnson. F. A., Post-graduate student, M. A. C. 

Jones. T. H., Easton. 

Larned, A. J., Lyonsvllle. 

Larsen. David, Honolulu, Hawaii, Plant Pathologist, 
Sugar Experiment Station. 

Liang, Lai Kwei, Graduate Student, Cornell Unl 
verslty. 

Miller, D. P., Forester, Shawnee-on- Delaware. Pa. 

Paige, George. 610 Elm St.. New Haven, Conn. 

Parker, J. R., Montague City, Principal of Monta- 
gue Agricultural High School. 



Philbrick, E. D., Davey School of Forestry, Red- 
bank, N.J. 

Reed, H. B., Dairyman, Conyers Manor, Greenwich, 
Conn. 

Regan, W. S., Post-graduate Student, M. A. C, 
Nursery Inspector. 

Sawyer, W. F., Sterling. 

Shattuck, L. A., Ipswich, 

Thurston, F. G., Post-graduate Student, M. A. C. 

Turner, Miss O. M., Amherst, 

Turner, W. F., Auburn, Ala., Assistant Entomologist, 
State Experiment Station. 

Verbeck, R. H., Petersham, Principal of Petersham 
Agricultural High School. 

Warner, T. L., Clapp & Abercromble, 90 Main St.. 
Greenfield. 

Waugh, T. F., Worcester. 

Wellington, J. W., Fruit Farmer, Waltham. 

Wheeler, H. T., Farmer, Lexington. 

Whiting. A. L., Kingston. R. I.. Assistant Agricul- 
turist, State Experiment Station. 

Whltmarsh. R. D., Post-graduate Student, M.A.C. 

Wright, S. J., Marlboro, Poultry Manager, Marl- 
boro Stock Farm. 



We have a very large line of Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, one to 
suit everybody. If one bought is not satisfactory we will exchange. 

Waterman's Fountain Pen Ink. 

A full line of Photographic Supplies. 

Eastman's Kodaks. Premo Cameras. 

Be sure that you load your camera with an Eastman Film. It is the best. 
Look for Kodak on the end of the spool. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 






s 



16 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



^UTFLOWERS 

DIVISIOH OF HORTICULTURE, i I C 

Telephone 
Author^ Dorb 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 

L H. Tourtelotte. 
3B E. Dorb- ' 

k ™llHl T ^ PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 
POULTRY AND GAMB. "»™_«,^ 

BEEF, MUTTON, LIMB, ?**_ J " SCHILLARE> 

■"• •»' Northampton, Mas*. 

U2 Main Street, 

Tel. 332-2. 

J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

\<3 Pw/ I Telephone Connection, _ —' —- 

G SPALDING & BROS. JTt^TRO^TT 

rf* , —I Manufacturers to the World 



C„ rM r North .oJ l/l-S^B— -» » D, ' i0,, ** 

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Tb€ of 0«Wal Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 



Uniform* 
tor ail 
Athletic 
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Washington S»t.t-oui» 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMFLKTK LINK OF GOODS 
SUITBD TO THR STUDENTS* WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



AH goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



KSTABLISIIKV !K51. 

EIMER & AMEND, 

20.V211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YOKK. 

mniRrKM ikd mawukacthrkkb i>r 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY OOODS. 

Wc handle the bast of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABOKATORY. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, • - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



'BILL" 



PLBPEB, 8TEW i MS HTTE8, 
hi ttiia a una i« a* 80 

UT Telephone 3°-"- 
|SH0. .SI-, NO.TH Pl.A.AHT !>T, 

^TbTb^ORATH & SON 

Passenger andlaggage Transfer. 

«r ii ■ i iiw Prompt Attention 
Order* Left at Amherst House W.Il K.ce,ve 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

[Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 
M. A. C. TRADE. 
IS Pairs of Pants Pressed for J1.50. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON. MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



J. A. 

PLEASANT ST., 



URNER. 

OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



HARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

>ston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER ft CO. 



CilWrWft * ftOMHOUSt 



AttHast , Aa$$. 












THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



OounBGtiuut vaiiey street Railway Go. 

.4 VII IKS I IHtlSION. 
i hi - will ifii \ i- Amharsl keel Northampton oi> the how sad 
hnl( hour (roin 6.30 4 a.tU) 10-Mr. m. Banday* Ma awl eat 

Will l«?HV« ill -•'••> *■ M. 

\1\in on UK, (.iiKt.MiKi.ii, Mash. 

.lolnt A.Tin.'K»", Sii|.t. 

SOUTHAMPTON I WICK, HfJ Mun -l 

I W. « lH|i|'. \--t Bnpt. IVIil'liiin. , Ntnlliiiii |ttn I-' 1- 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To aai jroarsulo. Coae to m for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Ri pairing ii -i" i lull \ . 

CHARLES DORAY, 

(l|'|'iis| IK. TOWM II XKI.. 

Amherst k Sunderland Street Railway Co. 

Can leave Amhetsl for HoJyoke at 22 and 62 
iniiiuti's paat e«ch hour until 9.58 r m., ami llolyokr 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.80P.M. 

Spoeitil Cars at ivasonalilr rait .-t. 

!I. M. ALDBtCH Siipt. 

Telephone 71-2 Aniliei-; 

Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



WANTED 

COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN 
to act as our Salei Agents. Earn enough during the sum- 
mer to pay yourexpenaea for the next year. Our propo- 
■ition offers 40% profit. No capital required. Write lor 
full particulars. I atatogue and aaraplet free. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS COMPANY 

,209 W. Taytor St.. Chicago, Iff 

O. 8. QATBSi !>.!>.«. 

DENTALi ROOMS, 

I ll.Klfs BLOCK, AMIIKKST. MASS 



E. H. DICKINSON, D. 33. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS- 

WII.I.IAMs BLOCK, • AMIIKKST. MASS. 

OKKII K llol'KH 
O TO 12 A.. M-, 1-30 TO 6 F»- M- 

Btber and Nltrooa Oxide Gas adastatstared when desired 




( OKRKCTBO TO JAN. I, m% 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intenaedt- 
iia station^, ooanaeting at Farmer for Springield, 
Worcester aad Boatoa at 8.42 a. m., 12.16 r. ■., 

expreee, and 5.48 p. *. The . r ).4;'> v. m. enaneeta 

at New London for New York via Norwich line 
Steamer*! 

NORTH ROUND. 
Leave Amherst for Bmttleboro and Intermediate 

stations at H.I-> A. m., L'..'»7 r. m., ejq^ttMh and 
6.27 r. m. 

Week daje only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

.1. \v. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



ifffe 



$ 



1 . 



m 



—..j 1 



> 



WEBSTER'S ' 



INTERNMIOMM 



DICTIONARY 



! 



A I . I ! ; 1 : \ I : \ r, CM f>» 

Besides an accurate pracUedU s."di ' i'v 
vocaUr ; ' nf English, with S\t 

WOUtS,i>ieInJt>;:. . tit : It D lal.latonrol 

too English Jjorfjcar: 3.0 luotolr auncl.v. or, 
Dicu wGJwel Bl ■■ 

graphical T)U :?iorary,Voc .bu< -y o' I .rrlpMUPi, 
Greek snd I. IU-h uir 

Names, Foreign Quotations. Abb. t . ;^i.c. 

•i.sso i>A(iKM. .'<.) h.m -.'; ;:.\ . 'i. • •. 
suoi ■i.Dvor not oy.N i < :i \ ;>••:..' 

WEB 

ma i*Aii *»mi 
Writo for "The Story of a Bo 
G. & C MEKKIAM CO., S~>-.rr 



i .Mil. 

il,Mm. 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

•J7 Main St., Ntuu tump n.\. 

.Mii-.mic llloek, iifiu Depot, OpoB i'\«-ry day. 

Lunelle*, Confeet ninei y , ( i^uia Noted ft»r il» excellent 

Oyster stew un.i clam Cbowitor. 

Clonetl only from 1 a. m. tt> 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANiaCTI'HKK <>K 

SODA WATERS, 

Piaoappto, Losaoa ami Qaiaisa Tonic, Biroa aoaraad Utagw 

AU-. Fountain* churKeil SO ortler 
KlVKK STKKKT, SOUTHAMPTON, MASS 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAW SODA 



K Par Excellence. 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR. 

Il«> i reel veil tht lati >t IjiIiiii s for the aprtag Htnl miiii iner 

trade of or in GonuVmea'a Oaraivnta. Also does l.atiie-' 
Oarnteote in a aatiafactory naanor. 

Cleaning, Altering;, Uepairing 

and Preaaing promptly (l<»n«'. 

J^-Military Work I S|»eeialt> .^JTiJ 

Under the Poet Ofttee, - - Amiikkst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New ami Upto- Date 



Bpeetai Attentioa liven tt> AthU-tic Teatne, Knit«-r- 
nity and Alumni Hunqt cts. 

HKST SKKVICKS AT UKASONAIW.K l'KICKS. 

I). II. KENDMWK, r n p H d or. 



TRY OUR 

BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. Ki'NGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amhkrst. Mass. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUKDRY 

and Carpel Renovating Establishment. 



."VI. A. O. Av't, 



Cm W.XX'iClllt, *« »»» 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday tleliveretl I'liurstlay. 

Thurstlay tleliven .1 Satunlay. 

.^SATISFACTION OUARA NTEBD. *^-7 t 
II. A. VTI.EY, Matiayr. 

<UH< K 

3Zast Pleasant Street. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone <>r call. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT Till 



COLLEGE JS T< >!*]£. 



The 4'liiMren !,••■ 1 1 n | • | . \ . 

I'., e .ii-. 1 lii ir elot lies me mi..', on tin Niw IIomk 'UIm, 

Machihr, which (act, at.sstw-f ibi it ••! > • < \ - " M«>tb« i - 

■honltl ret niie at inn i it- it win .in fur tin 1 1 . 1 1 ii.ii ii- in feiirs 

to enine. l»«-»ler-< Kvtl\whti> 






flfoaeeacbusetts 
Bgricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



l. SHORT COURSES as follows i 

(a) A Short Wintkk Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bex Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School or Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2 ± FOUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3 POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degress of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 









-llU 






THE COLLEGE SMAL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 2 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS.. OCTOBER 14. 1908 





'7 



We would m a share of your patronage, we "J^^£*£ 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

sanderson~6Tthompson'S 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 14. 1908 



NO. 



GO TO 



page's Sboe Store 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collbgb Siowal, Amhbsst. Mass. Thb Signal will be 
»ent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. ___■». 

BOABD OF EDITORS 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BR1CCS, 1909. Business Manager. 

W. R. CLARKE. 1910. Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON. 1910. Assistant Business Manager. 
R C POTTER. 1909. College Notes. L. C. BROWN. 1910, Athletic Notes. 

M. F. GEER. 1909. Ahimni Notes. H. A. BROOKS. 1 9 1 0. Special. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Y. M. C. A. Notes. A. H. SHARPE. 1911. 

S. R. PARSONS. 1911. 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



MAN ACER OF THIS PAPEK USES A T »r— i ».00 p ar «J— r Is) adpe-aee. Slagl e Copies 10c. Postage outelde of Ualted States, and Canada. Me. Mtra. 

* o*/-.*r*T>c niD*r"rnDV 



KeTmilleti , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 
VIOlilH, BMUO, PWiOOIilll, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULI8T8 PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 

THURBERS 

VARIETY STORE. 
M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Smith Premier 
Typewriter 

AND IS PLEASED TO SAY THAT IT GIVES 

Perfect Satisfaction. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot-Bail Association. 
Basket-Bali Association. 
Base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
R. C. Llndblad, Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Indei. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Musical Association. 



O. C. Bartlett. President 
R. C. Llndblad. Pres. 
F. T. Haynes, Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Poat Office at Amherst. 




Informal, Saturday, Oct. 17, Drill Hall. 



At the request of the Senate, Captain Martin most 
willingly excused the battalion from drill on the day of 
the tug-of-war. The student body expresses Its 
appreciation of the privilege granted. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



^^^uTnctures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a~Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 

COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savlags Bm* Block. 



Whatever else may be said of the political move- 
ment of the student body it has created a lively fol- 
lowing and provoked ardent discussion. It is to be 
sincerely hoped that this interest will increase and 
that every club formed is in dead earnest. A good 
beginning has been made. Why cannot we have an 
election of our own in November in accordance with 
the custom of other colleges? 

FRESHMEN, COME OUT. 

It is strange that a class comprising almost half 
the college cannot find a big bunch of men of enough 
spirit to get out on the field and really amount to 
something. Get busy, you Freshmen, and do some- 



thing for your college. The manager won't bite you 
if you ask him for a suit. Neither will the coach. 
Maybe your college spirit is low. Then show your 
class spirit, and come out and get some practice for 
the coming game with those deadly enemies of yours 
in the next class. Or maybe your class spirit is low. 
If so, come out for selfish reasons and see if you 
can't win your letter or your numerals. Come out, 
anyway, and never mind the motive. Just come. 



S1NC YE STUDENTS, S1NC ! 

I think everyone was pleased with College night 
held October second, and great credit should be given 
the President and others who conceived and carried 
out the idea. The cheering was hearty and spirited. 
In one particular only was the writer somewhat disap- 
pointed, namely, in the singing of the student body. 
It seemed to lack both in spirit and variety of mate- 
rial. In this respect leadership is needed. The 
boys need to familiarize themselves with a wider 
range of songs and to receive some systematic drill. 



* 






\i 



THfe COLLEGE SIGNAL 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



n 



Songs appropriate for our students ought to be 
brought together and made available for use. I wish 
we had a few more songs that belonged distinctly to 
our College. Who will be the undergraduate or 
alumnus to furnish the words and music for two new 
college songs ? Those who have had the privilege of 
listening to the songs of the students in German uni- 
versities cannot fail to have been Impressed with the 
inspiration and uplift that comes from the cooperative 
singing. SING YE STUDENTS, SING. 

J. B. LlNDSEY, '83. 



Brusse. c. 

Pcavar. r. g.. 

R. Bankart, r. t.. 

L. Bankart. Dreyfus. Steinert. Lew.s. r. e 

Dodge. Ryan, q. b., 

Hawley. Steward. 1. h. b. 

Ingersoll. Driver. Burns, r. h. b.. 



c, Alger 
1. g., Hazen 
1. t , Crosby 
I. e.. Turner 
q. b.. Morse 
r. h. b.. Neale 
1. h. b.. Blaney. Walker 



f. b., Hosmer 
Marks. Dudley, f. b.. 

Score-Dartmouth 23. Touchdowns-Hawley. Ingersoll. 
Marks. Sherwin. Coals (rom touchdowns-R. Bankart 3. 
Umpire-O'Reilly of Boston. Referee-Murphy of Worces- 
ter. Linesmen -Keady and Reed of Dartmouth, Crossman 
of M. A. C. Time-25 and 20 minute periods. 



/IthUtic |io*ff 



Dartmouth, 23; M. A. C, 0. 

The Dartmouth football team plainly out-classed 
our team In the game at Hanover last Saturday. 
But the score merely Indicates the relative scoring 
ability of the teams, and does not show the fact that 
the losers played a strong game ail the time. It being 
even better in the second half than in the first. 

The first klckoff went over Dartmouth's goal line. 
After the kick-out from the 25 yard line, we could 
not gain, and by a series of end runs Dartmouth went 
45 yards for a touchdown. The goal was kicked. 

Score, 0-6. 

The second klckoff was followed by a brilliant play 
by L Bankart, who made a 40 yard run after catch- 
ing a forward pass. The ball was rushed over in 
three downs. The rest of this half was not remark- 
able, except for Johnson's 50 yard run after he had 
picked up a Dartmouth fumble. He was tackled by 
Ryan on the 18 yard line. This was the nearest we 
came to scoring. Score, 0-11. 

During the second half the ball was in Dartmouth's 
possession most of the time, they using old-fashioned 
tactics. Mark's line plunging was a feature. Two 
touchdowns were scored during this half, leaving the 
score, 0-23. Captain Turner and Johnson showed 
up especially well for Massachusetts. 
The summary 



DARTMOUTH. 

Elcock. Daly. I. e.. 
Sherwin, Davis, 1. t., 
Tobin, Thompson, 1. g.. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. e., Leonard 

r. t., Johnson 

r. g.. Schermerhorn 



FRESHMEN WIN TUG OF-WAR. 

The annual tug-of-war across the pond was held 
Monday, Oct. 5, between the two lower classes. 
The water was at such a low level that it was neces- 
sary to use the north end of the pond, where it is 
usually deep. The Sophomores had choice of sides, 
and wisely chose the west. Forty-four men, or 
95^ of the smaller class, were on each side. The 
contest began at 4-35 and lasted 15 minutes. It was 
a longer and severer struggle than that of last year, 
which was a tie. The rope remained nearly station- 
ary for about twelve minutes, moving a few feet one 
way then a few the other way. Finally the first three 
or four men on the west side reached the water's 
edge, and were even dragged out a short distance into 
the pond. Realizing the uselessness of pulling where 
the rope was held above their heads by their class- 
mates still above them on the steep bank, they 
released the rope, waded ashore, and again took hold 
of the rope on dry land. 

But the Freshmen, seeing that the advantage lay 
with them, settled down still further to business, and 
soon had the rope trailing after them up around Wil- 
der Hall. 

Many of the townspeople and Amherst College 
students, as well as all the undergraduates and faculty 
of our college assembled to watch the contest, and 
cameras were nearly as numerous as were the 
animated spectators. 

By winning this event the Freshmen are permitted 
to display class flags and other class insignia in their 
rooms, without danger of their confiscation by the 
Sophomores. 



DOUBTFUL PLAY A SAFETY. 

The result of the Rhode Island game which was in 
doubt at the time of the previous issue of the Signal, 
has been definitely fixed as a victory for M. A. C, 
2-0, the doubtful play being a safety. 

The football situation is not materially better than 
it was two weeks ago. Our youngest class contains 
almost no names worthy of mention. Walker, '12, 
stands some chance of substituting in the backfield. 
Smith, '12, at quarter is an unknown quantity having 
just come out. The old men on the squad are in 
good shape and doing good work. Morse seems to 
have solved the quarterback problem. Hazen has 
improved a great deal over last year's form and shows 
lots of life. Captain Turner and Alger are showing 
their ability in good shape. 

Immediately after Assembly last Wednesday a 
short mass meeting in the interests of athletics was 
called. Dr. Reynolds, physical director, presided. 
The main question before the meeting was whether 
the continuance of basketball was advisable, there 
being many who wished to use the money necessary 
for that for some other branch of athletics, such as 
track work. After some discussion, It was voted to 
continue basketball at least one year more ; also to 
confine the schedule to college teams. 

Dr. Reynolds spoke of his plans for an interclass 
cross-country run next spring. There are to be five 
from each class, determined by competition among 
the members of each class. The points will count as 
follows: 1st, 20; 2nd, 19; 3rd, 18; etc. The class 
with the highest total will win. The meeting, at the 
request of the chairman, voted $15 for prizes for the 
■individual winners. 

William E. Leonard, '10, has been elected assist- 
»nt manager of the basketball team, and Charles A. 
-odge, 'II, assistant manager of the baseball team. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

let, 15.— Y. M. C. A., 7-00 p.m. Chapel. Speaker, 

E. C. Worman. 
)ct. 17.— Football. M. A. C. vs. Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute, 3-00 p. m. Campus. 
Informal, 4-00 p. m. Drill hall. 

tat. 18.— Bible Study, 4-00 p. m. Chapel. 

Vespers. 5 00 p. m. Chapel. Speaker, 

F. L. Willis of Worcester. 



Oct. 20.— Stockbridge club. 7-00 p m. 

Oct. 21.— Assembly, 1-30 p. m. Speaker. Presi- 
dent George E. Fellows of the Univer- 
sity of Maine. Subject, Phi Kappa Phi 
Oration. 

Oct. 22.— Y. M. C. A., 7-00 p. m. Chapel. 

Oct. 25.— Bible Study, 4 p. m. 

Vespers, 5-00 p. m., Chapel. Speaker, 
Rev. E. S. Sanderson of Providence, 
R. I. 

Oct. 27.— Stockbridge club, 7-00 p. m. Agricul- 
tural recitation room. 

Oct. 28. Assembly, 1-30 p. m. Chapel. Class 
Talks. 



College NotfS- 



Plans are on foot for the formation of an active 
chemical club. 

C. F. Allen and C. S. Gillette, '08. have been 
about college recently. 

The highway within the limits of lhe college 
grounds is being macadamized. 

At a meeting of the Signal Board, Oct. 7. A. H. 
Sharpe, 'II, was elected to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of R. N. Hallowell. W. R. 
Clarke, '10, was promoted to the position of assistant 
editor. 

In a practice scrimmage, Sept. 30, Sexton, '09, a 
veteran at tackle, split a bone in his elbow, throwing 
the latter out of joint at the same time. This injury 
will keep him out of the game for the rest of the 
season. 

On Saturday, Oct. 3. the Senior class in Land- 
scape Gardening under the guidance of Professor 
Waugh visited the capital grounds, and Elizabeth and 
Keney Parks at Hartford. Conn. The time was 
spent in going over the grounds and sketching and 
noting the prominent features. The faults and mer- 
its of particular constructions were discussed thor- 
oughly and criticised by the members of the party. 
All pronounced the trip both profitable and enjoyable. 

The annual meeting of the Mettawampe Club for 
the election of officers for the ensuing year was held 
Wednesday, Sept. 30 at 5-30 p. m. The following 



9 

3L0 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*\ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 




ballot was prepared and accepted by the Club: Presi- 
dent, A. V. Osmun; Secretary and Treasurer, H. L. 
White; Auditor, H. D. Phelps; Executive Commit- 
tee P. L. Reynolds, K. L. Butterfield. W. R. 

Hart, J. A. Foord, R. D. Lull. W. N. Wallace, C. 

A. Lodge; Trek-Masters. J. B. Paige, H. F. Tomp- 

son, C. E. Gordon. R. L. Gribben. 

It was voted to publish a program of the year's 

treks and place copies in the hands of everyone in 

college. It is expected a thorough canvass of the 

undergraduates will be made to arouse Interest in the 

activities of the Club. 



COLLEGE NIGHT OBSERVED. 

There was a notable gathering at Draper Hall on 
Friday evening, Oct. 2. The trustees, faculty, 
alumni and the undergraduates joined to raise the 
spirit of loyalty to Alma Mater and the spirit of good 
fellowship to the highest. It was "College Night" 
and it was the 4 1st anniversary of the founding of the 

college. 

The undergraduates were In their places at 6 
o'clock when the trustees accompanied by the faculty 
entered the hall. All stood and sang "Sons of Old 
Massachusetts." Then a good supper was served 
and at 7-00 everybody was in good humor for the 
long list of speeches. President Butterfield acted as 
toastmaster. He spoke In his Introduction of the 
changes in the last 41 years. He stated what the 
college really stands for and pointed out the signifi- 
cance of the coming together of the trustees, the 
faculty, alumni and students In such a meeting, 
emphasizing the responsibility that everyone bears to 
the college. President Butterfield then introduced 
Representative Frank A. Hosmer of Amherst, as one 
who while not a member of any of the four classes 
most closely allied to the college, yet is nevertheless 
an Indispensable factor when it comes to asking for 
appropriations. Mr. Hosmer spoke of the value of 
Intensive agriculture and its opportunities to young 
men of today. He said in substance, "40 years ago it 
was thought that agriculture had attained its limit but 
today we appreciate the fact, from our scientific 
methods and intensive farming, that agriculture Is 
only in Its Infancy. There are boundless opportuni- 
ties and rewards in this field of employment and for 
this reason I congratulate you, young men, for choos- 



ing this institution in preparation for your life work. 
* * » * But for what you are receiving here 
I am conscious that you are conscious of the debt you 
owe to the college." Mr. Hosmer called the atten- 
tion of those present to the time and energy required 
of President Butterfield to prepare the annual budget 
and put it through the different stages of its passage 
as an apppropriation. "But" he said "the life of the 
college depends upon that work. The college that 
fails to progress is already dead. " 

At the close of Mr. Hosmer's address the college 
quartet gave an excellent selection and were encored. 
Dr. J. B. Lindsey of the Experiment Station Staff 
was the next speaker. He reviewed the increase in 
number of buildings during the past 25 years and 
mentioned that there are on the board of trustees only 
three that were members a quarter of a century ago, 
viz. William Wheeler, William H. Bowker and J. 
Howe Demond. Dr. Lindsey painted bright visions 
of the future and pointed out the urgent need of a new 
| entomological building, an agricultural building to 
be known as Stockbridge Hall, a new chemical build- 
ing and an athletic field. He said in substance, "I 
believe that this college Is going to be a greater power 
for good in the future than In the past, not only for 
young men who are being trained but as the best 
scientific institution in the country. * * * I 
believe this college should be the center where men 
can be trained for a scientific career." Dr. Lindsey 
proposed the word ' 'co-operation" as a motto for the 
year and in closing said. "We don't want to forget 
the man at the head of this institution. So 1 sav I 
want all to stand and give the Massachusetts yell for 
the president and trustees." 

Then to express it in President Butterfield 's words 
"a man with steam always in his boilers" was Intro- 
duced in Herbert Myrick. '82. of the Phelps Publish- 
ing Co., Springfield. Mr. Myrick, in humorous vein, 
drove home some well-founded truths. After relating 
reminiscences of his college days to show what It 
means sometimes to live up to a contract he became 
more serious and from a remarkable business experi 
ence drew lessons of use to college men. He said, 
"Take care of your physical organism and there is no 
limit to your capacity. M. A. C. develops capacity. 
When you get up to sing the college song let every 
one sing ; no matter if you don't know how— sing 



What we need is individual effort, development of 
individual capacity first, then co-operation. In the 
life in the college and about college develop leader- 
ship." Mr. Myrick spoke of the honor conferred 
upon President Butterfield by his appointment by 
President Roosevelt to the National Commission on 
Conservation of Resources. He referred to the 
industrial education movement and in closing 
said, "That movement and others connected 
with it is going to open a field for men as fast 
as they can be turned out. You young men cannot 
realize how the new education has had to fight Its 
way in the last forty years." 

Short yells for Dr. Lindsey, Representative Hos- 
mer and Mr. Myrick were given. Then President 
Butterfield called for the long yell for Mr. Dumond, 
the oldest member of the board of trustees. P. A. 
Racicot, '11, rendered a violin solo. 

K. E. Gillett. '08, gave a talk on college life and 
college spirit. He said that we do not appreciate the 
value of a college experience until we have gone 
away, and later. "We came to college to learn how — 
to learn how to do things. " Mr. Gillett defined college 
spirit as mental attitude, a way of looking at things," 
and added, "It goes deeper than cheering for teams. " 

J. R. Parker, '08, likewise representing the 
younger alumni, gave a plain talk on college work 
and made this point, "The man who does most for 
the college gets the most out of the college." Short 
cheers were given for Parker and Gillett. 

Elmer D. Howe, of Marlboro, a trustee, very 
aptly began his speech with the gasolene engine as 
an illustration of the necessity of all parts of the col- 
lege machinery to be in working order and to work 
without friction. Referring to Mr. Gillett's definition 
of college spirit he spoke in such words as these, 
"College spirit does not mean gridiron cheering alone 
but work in the study and recitation rooms. Mani- 
fest the spirit of saying and doing the best. Do not 
say M. A. C. gives a good education; say M. A. C. 
gives the best education in the world. * * * We 
must select out of the broadening field of agriculture 



special lines. 



• • • 



Do not compare your results 



today with the results of others but with your results 
of yesterday." 

The last feature of the evening was the speech of 
Carroll D. Wright. He said in college life disap- 



pointments come through limitations. We expected 
too much of men. It is the training, concentration 
and the co-operation that makes the college man , in 
fact, co-operation even makes the administration of 
the college, but we must all work together. He 
talked of the growing Influence of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. He said while being the chief 
college of agriculture in New England today, it had 
great prospects to be the university of agriculture for 
New England. Mr. Wright talked of the magnitude 
of the industrial schools, the new forms of apprentice- 
ship and how there Is everywhere a demand for skilled 
labor. He said, "Increase skill, make men of 
ordinary capacity men of extraordinary capacity 
and you increase the prosperity of the country 
arid decrease the army of the unemployed." 
Mr. Wright then closed by giving a brief outline of 
how the legislature had to be approached for money. 
The occasion was concluded by college cheers and 
the singing of "Sons of Old Massachuetts." 

Most of the local alumni and the following out-of- 
town alumni were present at the college supper: L. 
B. Caswell, R. W. Lyman, '71 ; E. D. Howe, '81 ; 
Herbert Myrick, '82; C. W. Clapp, '86; F. H. 
Fowler,87; E. H. Belden, '88 ; C. M. Hubbard. 
M. H. Williams, '92; R. E. Smith, '94 ; C. G. 
Clark, '98; G. C. Hubbard. '99; A. C. Monahan. 
'00; W. A. Munson, '05; J. A. Anderson, K. E. 
Gillett, J. R. Parker, '08. 

The Board of Trustees was represented by G. 
Martin, secretary of the Board of Education, J. 
Ellsworth, secretary of the Board of Agriculture, 
H. Demond, Carroll D. Wright, E. D. Howe. 
F. Dickinson, G. H. Ellis, C. H. Preston, A. 
Pollard. 



H. 
L. 
J. 
M. 
G. 



POLITICS PERVADE COLLEGE. 

The spirit of the great national political campaign 
has reached M. A. C. The spark was kindled Oct. 
7, when at Assembly it was announced that there 
would be a Republican rally in the evening. A 
Republican club was organized with a membership of 
about 60. The following officers were elected : Pres- 
ident, R. C. Potter, '09; vice-president, H. T. 
Haynes, '10; secretary. P. A. Racicot, '11; cor- 
responding secretary, R. S. Eddy, '10; treasurer, 
H. L. Blaney, '11. President Butterfield was 
made honorary member of the club. 















5LJU 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




By the following morning zealous devotees of the 
Prohibition Party had secured a water wagon from 
the neighboring highway and were loud in their accla- 
mation of Eugene W. Chafin for president. That 
night aided by a band of Freshmen a parade was 
formed and the townspeople were given a demonstra- 
tion of a real Prohibition rally. The same evening 
three Bryan men met in the Chapel to found a Dem- 
ocratic club. This was postponed. Meanwhile 
Democratic ardor waxed strong. On Friday even- 
ing, Oct. 9, a Bryan club was organized as follows : 
President, O. B. Briggs. '09; vice-presidents, L. 
S Corbett, T. C. Waters and J. R. O'Grady, '09 ; 
secretary. L. C. Brown. '10; treasurer, US, 
McLaine. '10; S. at A., Guy E. McGown, '09; 
cheerleader. H. J. Baker. 'II. 

Furthermore, the Y. M. C. A. meeting on Thurs- 
day evening took the form of a general political rally. 
Professor Waugh gave a valuable talk on the duties 
of American citizenship. On the duty to vote he 
laid especial emphasis. 

Friday evening the Republican club held a stirring 
meeting in the College Chapel. Professor Grosvenor 
of Amherst college addressed the meeting. His sub- 
ject was "Mr. Taft." Mr. Grosvenor being acousin 
of Mr. Taft's gave some very interesting reminiscen- 
ces of his early life and of the few years previous to 
his nomination for President. Professor Grosvenor 
also talked of the party issues, qualities of the two 
candidates and the results of their respective elec- 
tions. After this speech Professor Waugh talked on 
the "Spirit of the Campaign." The meeting closed 
with much enthusiasm. 



when the prospects are so bright for a larger and 
greater institution. 1 wish to make this plea for col- 
lege memorabilia especially strong to the older gradu- 
ates for I feel sure that they have a great deal of 
uncared for material which can be properly arranged 
and better preserved for and put to increasing use 
here at the College Library. I will appreciate hear- 
ing from any one in regard to this matter. 
Sincerely. 

Charles K. Green. 

Librarian. 



COMMUNICATION. 

1 am very anxious to secure for the College Library 
back numbers of Aggie Life and the College Signal. 
It is also desired to have a complete set of all the 
publications relating to the different college activities, 
such as class books, the year books of the various 
Alumni Associations, college fraternities and organi- 
zations. If any graduate or student of the College or 
friend of the institution has any such publication and 
is willing to dispose of the same 1 would be very glad 
to receive them. It is especially desirable to have 
our files complete in all that relates to the life and 
history of the College, perhaps more so at this time 



STOCK-JUDGING CONTEST. 

Under the Auspices of the New England Fed- 
eration of Agricultural Students at the 

Brockton Fair. Oct. 1st. 
Not less important than any of the institutions or 
organizations which have the betterment of rural New 
England as their object is the New England Federa- 
tion of Agricultural Students. Founded almost a 
year ago by the combined forces of the Agricultural 
colleges of New England and having for its purpose 
the drawing together, into closer bonds of sympathy 
and into more earnest co-operation for the advance- 
ment of agricultural interests, of the students of these 
New England colleges, and which, though patterned 
largely after the American Federation of Agricultural 
Students, an institution of western origin, is to evolve 
into a distinctly eastern idea. 

Under the auspices of the New England Federa- 
tion of Agricultural Students there was instituted at 
the Brockton fair this year an innovation, which how- 
ever is but one of the several ways in which the Fed- 
eration is planning to manifest itself. This innova- 
tion was a stock-judging contest in which the four 
colleges, Maine. New Hampshire, Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island competed, each being represented by a 
team of three men. Our Massachusetts team con- 
sisted of Briggs. '09, Armstrong and French '10. 
The four breeds judged were Ayrshires, Guernseys. 
Holsteins and Jerseys, there being three classes of 
each; aged bulls, aged cows, and two-year-old heif- 
ers, making twelve classes in all. Six cups were 
offered by the Brockton Fair Association as prizes : 
three firsts and three seconds to go to the first and 
second teams respectively. At this writing the award 
of prizes has not yet been announced. Altogether 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



2. 3* 



the contest went oft as smoothly as could be 
desired and was a great credit to the energy and 
capabilities of President Irish of the Federation. 
Credit is also due Professor Gribben for taking such 
an active interest in the matter, and doing his utmost 
under the circumstances to put out a winning team. 

Y- M. f . A. No-tes. 



BIBLE STUDY FOR THE COLLEGE MAN. 

At the beginning of another college year 250 young 
men are gathered here at Amherst from all parts of 
Massachusetts, and from many neighboring states 
also, for intellectual training. What place should 
Bible study have in their time and thought ? 
What is its relation to the great divisions of educa- 
tional work: To Art, to Music, to Literature and to 
Science? And what is its bearing upon Life, Char- 
acter and Eternity ? These questions are vital in 
their importance and demand our honest, earnest 
consideration. 

am but stating what is generally accepted as 
being unquestionably true when I say that through the 
Word of God has been given us the very best that we 
have ever known in Art. Such names as those of 
Michelangelo, Raphael and Murillo need only be 
mentioned to support this statement. In Music the 
very best is acknowledged to be the great oratorios 
and among these The Messiah, and others based 
upon religious subjects, stand preeminent. Among 
the enduringly great masters of Literature there is 
hardly one who has not, in some degree, been inspired 
by the Word of God. Shakespeare, Milton, Brown- 
ing, Ruskin, Tennyson and many, many more show 
this to be true. While Science is often considered 
by those only partly informed as standing for the very 
[antithesis of Religion, we must acknowledge today 
[that the greatest living scientists, with very few 
[exceptions, agree in their belief in God and also in 
[the opinion that true Science but testifies also to the 
|Truth of the Bible. Very recently some of the most 
eminent iiving scientists have declared that the evi- 
ience as to the continued existence of the soul after 
ieath is now so abundant and indisputable as to 
imount to a positive, scientific demonstration of such 
sxistence. Surely what the greatest minds among 

len have found to be most inspiring and helpful in 



their own lives and work should not be put aside 
lightly by any man who honestly desires to become 
"educated" in the best things. 

The Bible is the basis of our law, of our social 
organization and. In fact, of all that is best in our 
boasted twentieth century civilization. The nations 
which have advanced farthest in human progress are 
those in which the Bible has been allowed to exert Its 
greatest Influence in the lives of the people. 
Whether we are appreciative of this and grateful for 
It, or quite the contrary, it is none the less true that 
every one of us is a sharer in the common heritage 
of blessing through the accumulated benefits resulting 
from the century old influences of this Book of books 
in the lives of our ancestors. It would easily prove 
us to be shallow of thought and hard of heart indeed 
did we attempt to deny this or even hesitate to 
acknowledge its truth. 

With these facts in mind as to the place which the 
study of the Bible has held in the intellectual, social 
and moral progress of the race, shall we not face the 
proposition squarely and manfully and willingly listen 
to whatever the Spirit of God, through the still, small 
voice of our own conscience, may have to say to 
each one of us about our personal need for the daily 
study of God's Word? 

Unquestionably It is true that any man may elect 
for himself that he will, or he will not, study It. 
Every man chooses his studies according to what he 
wants to know, to do, or to be. 

How is it with each of us: What do we wish to 
know ? One word may answer this question equally 
well for every one of us I am sure. We want to 

know the truth In any subject of our study and regard- 
ing all things with which we are concerned. Cer- 
tainly not least of all do we want to know the truth 
about ourselves, our relation to the Universe In which 
we live and to the eternity of time into which we are 
daily passing. 

What do we want to do? What is our first ambi- 
tion in life: To make money, or to make a man; to 
make a living, or to make a life ; to win earthly 
honor, or eternal happiness? Does it seem hard for 
a young man standing on the threshold of life to make 
his choice among these things ? No true man should 
be satisfied with doing something merely "good." 
He is failing if he is satisfied to stop short of all that 
he is capable of doing — which is nothing less than his 
level best. Perhaps it is not so much the nature of 
the work we do as the way in which we do It that 
makes our work small or great. Surely there Is 






3>± 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



-** Q 







nothing better (or any one of us than to do simply, 
sweetly and joyfully God's will for us. If we do that 
then we shall know that we have done our level best. 
And now what do we want to be? Run through 
the whole list of possibilities and I am sure that in 
the realm of your own personal experience you will 
come with me to say that what we want most of all 
to be is to be happy : That we may find in our hearts 
a deep, abiding, satisfying sense of a "right relation- 
ship to our Creator," of "service faithfully per- 
formed," of "life and character possibilities fulfilled." 
So whatever our views may be as to many of the 
minor questions of life I believe that, at heart, we 
are all united in our answers to these three questions : 
Every true man wants to know the truth, to do his 
level best and to be eternally happy. If we are 
mentallv convinced that the Word of God has more 
to reveal to us about those things than we can find 
elsewhere in the libraries or laboratories of earth, 
shall we not place it as the very first among the 
desirable objects of study, not for children only, but 
surely also for every college man? May we have the 
courage of our convictions in this matter and may 
our faith prove to be a "living faith" that shall lead 
us Into obedience to the light of truth that the Bible 
and Christ's life and teachings most clearly reveal to 

mankind. 

1 ask you now whether the reverent, earnest, intel- 
ligent and persistent study of the Word of God is not 
a very real necessity for every man of us who finds in 
his heart an appreciation of these fundamental truths 
and a desire to experience them in his own life? If 
each man answers this question honestly with his own 
soul, and as unto God his Creator and his final Judge. 
I know that he will say most positively that it is a 
necessity and that whatever else may crowd upon his 
time, he will not allow the lesser things to keep him 
from giving the very first place in his time and in his 
thought to the daily study of the Bible. 

W. E. Hinds. Auburn, Ala. 
M. A. C. '99. 



D*p&rtmtn4r N ** s ' 



Ex-'76.— Wednesday. Sept. 30. Henry Bond of 
Greenfield addressed the college at assembly. Mr. 
Bond, who has been a prominent officer of the Amer- 
ican Radiator Co., spoke on "The Examinations of 
the World." 



FLORICULTURE. 
Work on the new greenhouses is being pushed for- 
ward rapidly. The instruction building is to be a two- 
story structure with a basement, and will be brick 
with terracotta trimmings. Alien Bros., are the 

contractors. 

The contractors for the greenhouses are Lord and 
Burnham of New York. The contract for the con- 
crete foundations of the houses and all the othei con- 
crete work has been sub-let to E. N. Birnie of Lud- 
low, (Ex-*97.) 

Several changes have been made in the original 
plans in order to get the range farther back from the 
street, and allow frontage for future buildings. Two 
alleys, 12 feet wide, were placed toward the east, one 
connecting the instruction building with the palm 
house and the other connecting the student house with 
the palm house. The original specifications call for 
seven houses, but it was found necessary to drop two 
houses in order to bring the cost of the range within 
the appropriation of $17,000. 

The appropriation for the instruction building was 
$15,000 and $2,000 for equipmeut. The contract 
calls' for the completion of the instruction building 
by February 1,1909, and it is expected that the 
range will be finished about the same time. The 
cellar walls for the instruction building and student 
house are completed, and the iron frame-work for 
three houses is up. The mason work will probably be 
finished by Saturday night. 

RIFLE RANGE PRACTICE. 
A well equipped range has now been established 
on North East street. The range affords opportunity 
for 200-yd., 300-yd.. 500-yd. and 600-yd. shooting. 
10 rounds ot ammunition are allowed each member 
of the battalion in the three upper classes on each 
range for practice and 10 rounds on each range for 
record shooting. When the range was open for the 
first time, October, 3d. thirty men made their prac- 
ice shots. It is hoped that we shall be able to get a 
five man team to enter the Midwinter Intercollegiate 
Indoor Rifle Competition at Boston. Also to get a 
team for the National Rifle Shoot next spring. The 
Range will be open for shooting all day Saturday 
until further notice. 



SENIOR ELECTIVES. 

P. E. Alger, Veterinary Science, Agriculture, Bot- 
any, Pomology. 

W. D. Barlow. Entomology, Agricultural Education, 
Agriculture, Botany. 

B. F. Barnes, Agriculture, Market Gardening, Flori- 
culture, Veterinary Science. 

0. C. Bartlett, Entomology, Veterinary Science, 
Agriculture, Botany. 

0. B. Briggs, Veterinary Science, Agriculture, Land- 
scape Gardening, German. 

G. M. Brown, Pomology, Agricultural Education, 
Botany, English. 

D. J. Caffrey, Entomology, Veterinary Science, 

Botany, Floriculture. 
P. P. Cardin, Veterinary Science, Agriculture, 
French. Entomology. 

E. I. Chase, Military Science, English, Landscape 

Gardening. Chemistry. 
G. M. Codding, Entomology, Landscape Gardening, 

Military Science, Botany. 
L. S. Corbett. Veterinary Science, Agriculture, 

Chemistry, Military Science, Spanish. 
H. P. Crosby, Veterinary Science, Entomology, 

Chemistry, Botany. 
S. S. Crossman. Entomology, Veterinary Science, 

Spanish, Botany, Military Science, 

D. A. Curran, Spanish, Engineering, Mathematics, 

Landscape Gardening. 
G. R. Fulton, Veterinary Science, Entomology, 

Chemistry, Spanish. 
M. F. Geer, Entomology, Agriculture, Pomclogy, 

English, Agricultural Education. 
W. E. Geer, Entomology, Agriculture, Veterinary 

Science, Agricultural Education, Botany. 

E. F. Hathaway, Botany, Veterinary Science, Chem- 

istry, Floriculture. 

En- Lung Hsieh, Horticulture, Botany, Entomology, 
Agriculture. 

A. W. Hubbard. Veterinary Science, Agriculture, 
Botany, Agricultural Education. 

W. L. Ide, Veterinary Science, Agriculture, Pomo- 
logy, Botany,. 

D. F. Ingalls, Veterinary Science, Agricultural 
Education, Botany, 

Huan Jen, Entomology, Horticulture, Botany, Agri- 
cultural Education. 

H. 0. Knight, Entomology, Veterinary Science, 
Agriculture, Botany. 

R. C. Lindblad. Engineering, Mathematics, Military 
Science, Spanish. 

R. D. Lull, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Agricul- 
ture, Agricultural Education. 

G. E. MacGown, Agriculture, Veterinary Science, 
Pomology, French. 

J. V. Monahan. Entomology, Landscape Gardening, 
Floriculture, Botany. 



H. J. Neale, Entomology, Landscape Gardening, 
Floriculture, Botany. 

H. G. Noble, Entomology, Landscape Gardening, Ag- 
ricultural Education. Botany. 

J. Noyes, Engineering, Landscape Gardening, Flori- 
culture. 

J. R. O'Grady, Entomology. Botany. Agriculture. 
Floriculture. 

J. T. Oliver, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Floricul- 
ture, Market Gardening. 

H. D. Phelps, Engineering, Landscape Gardening. 

R. C. Potter, Entomology, Veterinary Science, 
Botany, Military Science, 

C. S. Putnam, Pomology, Agricultural Education. 
Botany. 

G. M. Shamiae, French, Pomology, Agricultural 
Education. 

M. T. Smulyan, Ei.glish. French, Agricultural Edu- 
cation, Pomology, Botany. 

J. B. Thomson. Entomology. Agriculture, Botany, 
Pomology. 

M. W. Thompson, Entomology, Agriculture, Agri 
cultural Education, Military Science, Botany. 

H. W. Turner, Pomology, Entomologv, Military 
Science, Agriculture. 

F. C. Warner, Engineering, Mathematics, Chemis- 
try, Military Science. 

C. R. Webb, Entomology, Landscape Gardening, 
Botany, Military Science. 

J. S. Whaley, Pomology, Market Gardening, Agri- 
culture, Botany, Chemistry. 

C. H. White, Veterinary Science, Agriculture, Agri- 
cultural Education, English. 

H. L. White, English, Agricultural Education, Land- 
scape Gardening. 



JUNIOR ELECTIVES. 

A. H. Allen. Agriculture, Arboriculture. 

R. E. Annis, Engineering, Mathematics, Lan Iscape 

Gardening 
R. P. Armstrong, Agriculture, Chemistry, Pomology. 

D. E. Bailey, Mathematics, Chemistry. 

J. C. Bailey. Agriculture, Pomology, Eotany. 

F. S. Beeman, Agriculture, Pomology, Chemistry. 

J. P. Blaney, Arboriculture. Botany, Landscape 

Gardening. 
Louis Brandt, Agriculture, Pomology. Arboriculture, 

Botany 
H. A. Brooks, Engineering, Mathematics, Landscape 

Gardening. 
S. C. Brooks, Agriculture, Pomology, Botany, 

Chemistry. 
L. C. Brown, Engineering, Mathematics, Chemistry. 

E. J. Burke, Chemistry, Arboriculture. 

W. R. Clarke, Chemistry, Agriculture, Botany. 
W. A. Cloues, Agriculture, Pomology, Arboriculture. 
H. T. Cowles. Zoology, Botany, Pomology. 



a, 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 








e F Damon Agriculture, Chemistry. Pomology 
L S D?ckinson. g Kugioeerutg. Mathematics. Land- 

scape Gardening. 
R. S. Eddy, Agriculture. Arboriculture, Landscape 

Gardening, 
i r [.-tirr-nn Zooloey. Pomology. Botany. 
J R J Fiske Agr cuLe, Arboriculture Pomology. 

l&'rXm. Apiculture, ^^G^L* 
H R. Francis, Arboriculture. Landscape Gardenmg, 

Engineering. 
H. W. French, Pomology, Agriculture . 
FT Haynes, Agriculture, Pomology, Chemistry. 
M S HM-n Chemistry, Zoology. Botany^ 
AW. Holland, Agncufture, Chemistry Pomotojy. 
C. 1. Hosmer. Arboriculture, Landscape G^rd-ning, 

Engineering. 
W C. Johnson, Mathematics, Chemistry 
W E. Leonard, Agriculture Botany. Arbonculture. 
L S McLaine, Zoology, Chemistry Botany. 
S w. Menoum, Agriculture. Pomology. 
F P. Nickless, Agriculture, Pomology, Cheml* try. 
r A Oertel Arbonculture, Pomology, ^ nem,s '^ 
F H Pamldge. Agriculture, Landscape Gardenmg, 
Pomology. Botany. -^j 

Geo. W. Paulsen, Agriculture. Pomology, Flor.cul- 

ture. 
P A Prouty. Agriculture. Chemistry. 
A F Rocki'ood: Engineering, Mathematics, Land- 

scape Gardening. 
Miss C. Roy, Agricultural Education. Botany, Agri- 
culture. ^u^^, 

L. G. Schermerhorn. Agriculture, Pomology, Chem- 

F S Thomas! S Agriculture, Chemistry, Pomology. 

W M Titus, Agriculture, Chemistry. 

E H Turner, Agriculture, Pomology. 

n" VT. Urban. Chemistry, Mathematics. 

G N Vinton, Agriculture, Chemistry, Pomology. 

R a' Wadron, Agriculture, Pomology, Botany 

W. N. WaUace, Pomology. Agriculture. Arboncul- 

ture. 
G. A. Nielsen. Arboriculture, Physics, 



Alumni. 



•72.-Dled talt June, William R. Peabody. St. 

°- U 78— Dr H E. Stockbridge of Atlanta, Ga.. the 
agricultural ' editor of the Southern Ruralist, made 
a brief visit at M. A. C. two weeks ago. 

-78 -On commencement day at Mt. Union Col- 
lege, Alliance. 0., the degree of Doctor of Laws was 
conferred on President Charles Sumner Howe, of the 
Case School of Applied Science. 



T 8 ^T _ L - ~Hills, director of the Vermont Exper- 
ime nt' Station, attended Brattleboro fair with i his 
annual exhibit of feeds and fertilizers. The ^ xhib 
attracted considerable attention and favorable 

comment. 

-82 — C S Plumb, professor of animal husbandry 
at Ohio State University, Columbus, spent part of 
the summer in France. Professor Plumb was with 
one of the largest buyers of French horses for £ 
American market, and accompanied h.n. on his trips 
through the horse-raising sections of the country 
He improved every opportunity to collect material lor 
a revised edition of his book, "Types and Breeds of 

Farm Animals" which was so cordially rece.ved by 

the agriculturalists of the country. 

•85 —Dr E W. Allen is acting as secretary of 

the Commission on Country Life, which was appointed 

by President Roosevelt. 

'88 -H C Bliss made an automobile trip through 

western Massachusetts, last month, and visited 

college. 

•90.-C. H. Jones of Burlington, Vt.. is spending 
his vacation In Massachusetts. 

•93_Dr E H. Lehnert of Smith Agricultural 
School judged horses at the Northampton fair, last 

week. ., 

'94 _E L. Boardman, who is being considered 
as a candidate for the Board of Trustees represented 
the State Board of Agriculture at the Northampton 
fair and also visited Amherst. 

'94._George H. Smith, Center Belmont, Me. 
•94 —Prof R E. Smith of California and N. D. 
Ingham, '05. were visiting college recently. Pro- 
fessor Smith gave a short address to the class in 

Botany. 

-95 _Prof E. A. White is recovering from a 
serious illness following an operation for appendicitis. 
He sat out-doors for the first time last Thursday and 
expects to be able to resume his duties in a week or 

two. 

•97. _C. A. Peters, Sterling Junction,* J. t. 

Peters. 

.97 __p H Smith recently supervised the com- 
petitive dairy tests at the Bernardston fair. He also 
attended the Brattleboro fair. 



su7 



'03. — H. J. Franklin, 1472 Raymond Ave., St 
Anthony Park, St. Paul, Minn. 

'04. — S. R. Parker recently visited college. Mr. 
Parker has just returned from Hawaii, where he spent 
two years. The first year he taught in the Kame- 
hameha School, and the second year he was engaged 
on a large private ranch. He has now accep'ed a 
position as superintendent of the large herd of Guern- 
seys belonging to George Mixter of Hardwick. The 
position is a responsible one, as the herd comprises 
about 300 head of pure-bred cattle. 

'05. — P. F. Williams is inspecting nurseries and 
is also teaching Horticulture in the Alabama Poly- 
technic Institute. 

'05. — Married, June 27, Miss Emma Marion Soch 
and Francis A. Bartlett. Mr. and Mrs. B^rtlett 
are at home at White Plains, N. Y. 

'05. — The marriage of Miss C. B. Ball of North 
Amherst and Walter B. Hatch has been announced 
for Oct. 14. 

'05. — Married, Aug. 8, Miss Florence E. Ripley 
and Grenville N. Willis. Mr. and Mrs. Willis will 
reside in Boston. 



'06. — Born, Aug. 19, to Mr. and Mrs. H. B. 
Filer, a daughter, Elizabeth. Owing to an error, 
the last Signal announced Mr. Filer as Park Com- 
missioner of Buffalo. Mr. Filer's position is that of 
City Forester. 

'06. — E. F. Gaskill went home last week for a 
short vacation. 

'06. — Born, July 8. to Mr. and Mrs. William 
Otis Taft, a son, Roger Sherman. 

'06. Married, Oct. 5, Miss Marie Susan Mill t 
and Addison Tyler Hastings, Jr. 

'06. — H. M. Russell recently spent part of his 
vacation in the eastern part of thi state. 

'07. — F. C. Peters has entered into partnership 
with F. A. Cutter, '07. They are engnged in the 
care and doctoring of trees. 

'07. — J. N. Summers left Amherst last Wednes- 
day for a two weeks vacation. 

'08. — C. F. Alljn is engaged on the work of the 
immigration commission, and is studying the foreign 
population in the vicinity of Amherst. 

'08. -F. A. Johnson visited his home In Westford 
for a few days last week. 



r>i*uo fts'roisi^ 



We have a very large line of Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, one to 
suit every-body. If one bought is not satisfactory we will exchange. 
Waterman's Fountain Pen Ink. 
A full line of Photographic Supplies. 
Eastman's Kodaks. Premo Cameras. 

Be sure that you load your camera with an Eastman Film. It is the best. 
I Look for Kodak on the end of the spool. 



DBUBly'S DWUG STOWE 






a,a, 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




C & K. DERBY (Quality dc Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMFOmTBD D1R» I 

FROM LONDON. 

CAMPION, 

-TAILOR AMD HABERDASHER, 
' A,L - AMHERST, MASS 



Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

|. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAILOR ■TOII« 

II AMITY STREBT. - AMHERST 

[•ported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, tit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand, fall early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Tki.ephonk 54-4- 

Rabar's Inn, 

oM.WI. Street, of, Man, SOUTHAMPTON. MA«H. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with 08. 
THK BEST PLACE TO DINK IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



Intkk-CoU.kc.atk BVftSAU <>" ACADEMIC COSTUHS 

College Caps jiijH iOipns. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 

Meist House Barter sum 

Four First Class Barbers 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 



Fancy Crackers, 



Confectionery and Fruit, 



Open Mondays from J 


r A. M. tO 8 P. M 


Tuesdays \ 


, « 6 ■ 


Wednesdays, ; 


r « 8 " 


Thursdays, \ 


, " 6 " 


Fridays, 


j «' 8 " 


Saturdays, 


j " 11 " 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Gftmiinf Peruvian Guano Pase. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 95?° Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



'For the 



THE COE-mOMlER 68PIPMY. 



a 4 -26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

Mmuficturers and Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It la generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRKJHT A DITSON 
have the beat looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The WRK1HT A DIT- 
SON SWP.ATF.RS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIGHT «te IMTfcSOlV 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 
iS WEST 30TH ST.. NEW YORK 

Chicago Pbotiimih b, k. I. Cahmioob, Mass. 




Land's Sake 



M 



USE 



BOWKERS 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 




SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 
UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

1£. A. THOMPMONa 

Rear First National bank, AMHEKS1 



Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

'262 Fourth Ave , Nkw York. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



il 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Gounecticui Valley Street Railway Co. 

AMHKKBT IUVISION. 

tian will leave Amherst and Northampton on tin- how and 
hall ^our from «30 A.M. till 10.30 P.M. Sunday* th, tort Ml 
will leave ut MJA. ^^ GKEKNKIELD , Masb. 
.Ji.hn A. Tangart, Sunt 

NOKTHAMfTON OKHCE, UW MAIN ST. 
C. W.Clapp. A»»t "upt. Telephone, Northampton, « I J. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To **v. your sole. Come tou.e for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

OrposiTK Town Hall. 



WANTED 



college: men and women 

to utu our Sales Agent*. Earn enough J«^ *«""»; 
mer to pay your expense! for the next year Our prono 
SSm otters 40X profit No capital required. Write lor 
full particulars. < dialogue and samples free. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS COMPANY 
I209 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Uh 

DENTAU ROOMS, 



Amherst & Sunderland strut Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at If ami 51 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 v m., ami Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour ami half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Snpt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amlier*:. 

" Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

0OBBSC1SD TO JAN. l. l»os. 



CUT LICK'S 11 LUCK. 



AMI1KK9T. MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK. • AMHKRST. MASS. 

office Hooks: 

& TO 12 A- ***-. I" 30 TO B P - M " 

Kther and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



"many books in one 
WEBSTER'S 

INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONARY 



Bn.l.a- 



SOUTH BOUND 
Leave Amherst for New London ami intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Huston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. M. connects 
at New London for New York via No. wich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH HOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattlehoro aid Intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a.m., 12.57 •■. m., express, »nd 

6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLKY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



!b«3raSSiKS±*BSb 

Colored Plates, Flags. State Seals. Etc. 
Brief History the English Language 
Guide to Pronunciation . • . — 

Scholarly Vocabulary of English 

Dictionary of Fiction - 

Oasetteer of the World _ 

Biographical Dictionary..— H 
Scripture Proper Names- 
Greek and Latin " 
English Christian " «. 
Foreign Words. . . _ 
Abbreviations . . — 



S.ISOPMW 

6 000 IllutnUou. 
SS.000 Ad<UdWor4» 

Should You Not Own Such a BookT 

WEBSTErTcT.LUEOIA IK DICTIONARY 
Utfgert of out .h,i,l ,m«its. .i.6la gf »- M°o llluiireuoa. 

WliU for -Dicti«»«T WrUU-^rMf- J*--* 5Srl 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

?7 MsiU St., NoKTIIAMIMON. 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunelle*, Confectionery, Cigar* Noted for It* excellent 
Oyster Stew anil Clam Chowder. 
Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



W. W. BOTNTON, 

MANUrACTUBKK OP 

«013^V WATEKS, 

1'lnsappla, Leuion and Ueruian Touic, lurch Ueeraud dinger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 

KlVKB STKKKT, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or oil. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR, 

lias received the latest fabrics Tor the spring and summer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen'* Garments. Also docs Ladies' 
Garment!* in a satisfactory tnunner. 

Cleaning. Altering, ttepairing 

and Pretfning promptly done. 

fcf-Mllitary Work a Specialty..^*, 
Under the Post OlHce, - - Amukkst, Mass. 

AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUpto Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE 1'RIOES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 

AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



.XI. A. C*. Ati'l, 



C H.WUHIt, '«>«» 



Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

. ^SATISFAOTION OUARAN'IfcJi-JD.IVT 1 
H. A. VTLKY, Manayrr. 

< inn t. : 

IDnant Pleasant Street. 

Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THK 



COLLEGE 



tokis. 



The Children are Happy. 

HecauHC their clothes ure made on the Xi.w HOBS Mtwino 
Mac mink, whii li fact, assure* them it r,«. ••rl|*." Mothers 
should yet one at once as It will do fur their < hlldren In yehri 
tocoue. Dealers Everywhere. 



' 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 




DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 



PHOTOGKAPHER* 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



ARTHUR E. DORR. *+ " ToimWUWTH. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WIIOLKMAI.K I.KALKK8 ANU .IOBBKKS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts.. Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street. - - - Northampton. Mass. 

Tel. 832-2. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



t'nitorma 
for all 
Athletic 

Sport* 



Implement* (inlf GyfllDaSiUfll 

Tr«ck and Apparatus 

Field SporU "T\ 

Spalding* handaomely illustrated catalogue of 
* III aporU contain* numerous suggestions 
Mailed free anywhere 
A. O. SPALDINU & BROS. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' HAKN, NF.AK EXPRESS OFFICE. 

AMHERST, MASS 
Telephone Connection, 

3 .l-T .TROTT 

PLIilB, STEHUl 4 BBS F1TTEB, 

HMD DEALER III STOVES MB RBHGES. 



San Francisco 
tsCity Minneapolis 
Buftaio Pittsburg Cincinnati New Orleans 

Syracuse Baltimore Detroit Cleveland 

v£Eton St. Louis Montreal an. I.,.,,l„„.l B* 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Lett at Ai.il.-rst House Will Raceive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 

FURHITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLBTK LINE OF GOOD8 
8IITKD TO TH« 8TUDBMTS' WAHT8. 

Bedsteads, Mattreaaes, PIUowb, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Loungea, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1861. 

EIMER& AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPOKTBM AND MAMCPACTUBBK8 UP 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY OOOX3S- 

We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash ami at Lowest Prices. 

EL. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL" 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $300 to 14.00. 

European Plan, Rooma with Bath 11.00, $1.50 and 
$1.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for fi.50. 

J. A- TURNER- 
PLEASANT ST.. OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKB. MAS8. 

Famous for it* popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER A CO. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 

A FULL LINE OF 

Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 






AMHftSf , AASS. 



-4-' 



THE^ 



tllbassacbusette 
Hgricultural 

dolleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follow,: 

(a) A Shout Wintkk Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses fonrfhll persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2. A FOUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butteri-ieud, Amherst, Mass. 



1M< & ■ Q-, 



'HE COLLEGE SI&IAL 



'OL. 19 



NO. 3 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS.. OCTOBER 28. 1908 







We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well knowi 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. VJi 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and i: 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 




GO TO 

Page's Sboe Store 

Next to Post Office. 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 

E. E. MILLETl, 

JEWELER AND OPTIC/ AN. 
VIOLIN, BANJO, IWAIHDOblN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Tins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 



We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



THE MANAGER OK THIS PAPER USES 

Smith Premier 
Typewriter 

AND IS PLEASED TO SAY THAT IT GIVE: 

Perfect Satisfaction. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 



Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



^ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'OL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 28. 1908 



NO. 3 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student! and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication! should be addressed. Collboi Signal. Amhskst. Mass. Th« Siqmal will be 
entto all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
lily the Business Manager. ___ 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BR1GGS, 1909. Business Manager. 

W.R.CLARKE. 1910, Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON. 1910, Assistant Business Manager. 
R C POTTER. 1909. College Notes. L. C. BROWN. 1910, Athletic Notes. 

M. F. GEER, 1909, Alumni Notes. H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Department Notes. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notes. A. H. SHARPE. 1911. 

S. R. PARSONS. 1911. 



Terms; fl.oo per gear in sdesnee. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United State* and Casada. Ik. **tf. 



|The Union. 
lAth'etic Board. 
IFoot-Bal! Association. 
I basket-Bali Association. 
| Base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate. 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager- 



Fraternity Conference, 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 



O. C. Bartlett. President 
R. C. Lindblad. Pres. 
F. T. Haynes. Manager 
C. H. White. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson. Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 




If there is any one thing that we lack to sustain 
Icollege spirit it is song. The popular song is heard 
lat every turn but the world outside sings that. We 
1 want semething distinctive, songs throbbing with the 
pulse-beats of a greater "Massachusetts," songs of 
the spirit of freedom that shall rend the bonds of ser- 
vitude to false ideals, songs that possess the heart, 
[songs that ring always with victory. Are our poets 
[asleep ? 



Referring to the account of the College barn fire 

in the issue of Sept. 30, it has been thought advisable 

in the light of later evidence and to explain away any 

| false notions, to publish this new evidence contained 

I in a statement by Prof. James A. Foord. The infer- 

jence that might be drawn from the article in question 

that spontaneous combustion was the probable cause 

is unfounded at least as regards the hay mentioned at 

the inquest. The statement follows :— The facts in 

the case are that no hay had been put in the barn 



during the five weeks preceding the fire, and further 
that the six loads of hay referred to In the report of 
the inquest as having been housed the same day 
that it was cut was— (1) practically clear timothy. 
(2) it was teddered twice before carting, (3) the 
whole amount, six loads, was put together on top of a 
mow, (4) no other hay was put above it, and (5) It 
was put in the barn six weeks before the fire. The 
readers of the Signal and others familiar with hay 
and its care will understand why we question the pos- 
sibility of "spontaneous combustion," at least so far 
as this hay is concerned. 



The Signal is in receipt of a clipping taken from 
the Boston Transcript of Aug. 6 by W. H. Bowker, 
71. The extracts were originally printed in the 
New York Sun. Although the date and the cause of 
their appearance are remote they are of such concern 
to M. A. C. that they are published. Mr. Bowker's 
fidelity to his trust is deserving of commendation. 

"In recent years some unkind things have been 
said of the Great and General Court of Massachu- 







3° 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



3> 



setts. Not long ago that body wrote itself down 
lower than its most bilious critic would dare to write 
it. This was the resolution passed without shame by 
these abject representatives of a State famous, his- 
torically rich and that used to be proud : 

Resolved, That the board of trustees of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College are hereby authorized 
and directed to use their best efforts to secure and 
accept for the college the benefit of the retiring fund 
of the Carnegie Foundation for the advancement of 
teachers. 

We are not aware that the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College is of any particular use to agriculture or 
Massachusetts. Still that state is amply able to pay 
the institution's bills and to provide old-age pensions 
for its professors. And here is where the inexhaust- 
ible vanity and money of Carnegie become a public 
menace and danger, blight public self-respect and 
turn a prosperous community into a begging letter 
writer. What's the use of paying even the paltriest 
mill of tax when Carnegie will provide. For the sake 
of library buildings town after town has submitted to 
the humiliation of mendicancy and saddled itself and 
posterity with debts to build another Carnegie 
monument. 

Now a State, hat in hand, with bated breath and 
whispering humbleness, asks alms of the great pro- 
moter of mendicity. 'Massachusetts, God forgive 
her, but she's a-kneelin' ' before 'the rest.' It is 
enough to make Faneuil Hall rock itself down, and 
the unicorn on the Old State House run himself 
through with his own horn. 

It is a pleasure to see the Springfield Republican, 
which for all its crankinesses and divigations has 
more of the old Massachusetts spirit than any other 
journal in the State, lambasting mightily this degrad- 
ing pursuit of eleemosynary dollars. God save the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts- from being a pen- 
sioner in her old age !" 



"BUT SOFTLY ! SOFTLY ! ! " 
(W. H. Bowkerof Boston.) 

"I enjoyed reading the Sun's keen but savage 
remarks on the 'resolution passed by the recent 
Massachusetts Legislature authorizing the board of 
trustees of the Massachusetts Agricultural College to 
use its best efforts to secure and accept for the col- 
lege the benefit of the retiring fund of the Carnegie 



Foundation for the advancement of teachers. ' 

Let me say that there were some members of the 
board of trustees who were not in favor of that action, 
and one in particular who wrote an administrator of 
the foundation that he would prefer to see Mr. Car- 
negie give scholarships or endow chairs in the land 
grant colleges and state universities rather than to 
pension the professors, feeling that the State should 
take care of its teachers in all its schools and in 
State colleges. 

There is a considerable party in this country which 
holds, inasmuch as all wealth is accumulated under 
the laws and protection of the State, that the State 
should be the final repository and beneficiary of the 
same. Mr. Carnegie came to this country a poor 
bairn, and under the protection of our laws, both 
State and national, he has honorably and lawfully 
accumulated in an 'Arabian night,' as it were, the 
largest fortune known in history. What could be 
more fitting, more appreciative, what better way 
could be suggested for repaying the nation which 
gladly adopted and fostered him and his industries, 
than for him to found scholarships and endow chairs, 
especially in the land grant colleges and State univer 
sities, founded as they were by the United States 
government under the Morrill act of 1862 and will- 
ingly supported as they still are by each State— insti- 
tutions which are probably quite as democratic, quite 
as free from sectarianism and caste, and quite as 
useful as any educational institutions in the country? 

You may not be 'aware that the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College (founded by the United States 
government in Massachusetts, 1864) is of any partic 
ular use to agriculture or Massachusetts,' but if you 
will ask your 'cranky friend,' the Springfield Repub- 
lican, it will tell you that while you are sound on the 
Carnegie pension matter, you are uninformed as to 
the usefulness of that institution in this State ; but if 
the college does not educate farmers, it is trying to 
educate ministers, as you will see by the summer 
school program enclosed. Next year we will have 
a summer course for editors. 

The trouble with the editors of our great daily 
papers is that most of them were educated at so- 
called classical colleges, nearly all of which have 
received 'alms of the great promoters of mendicity' 
(orthodox, Unitarian and latterly Baptist), and conse- 



quently their education and training are so broad that 
they seek to survey the whole universe, even looking 
f or the spots on the sun, but are so dazzled by its 
light and their own brilliancy that they see nothing 
else. 



Athletic No*«- 



The Athletic Board recently sent out the eighth 
appeal to the alumni in behalf of the student body for 
help in securing a coach for the season's football 
team. During the last seven years alumni contribu- 
tions have been received as follows : — 1 90 1 , $256. 50 ; 
1902, $281.00; 1903. $168.00; 1904, $251 .03; 
1905, $336.50; 1906, $315.90 ; 1907, $27 1 .50. 

An appeal was also made to send any footballs, 
baseballs, etc., that the alumni may have, which can 
be identified as won at a particular game and which 
will be properly placed in the cases of the Trophy 
Room with score, year, etc., and the name of the 
donor. 



Schermerhorn, r. t. 
Leonard, r. e. 
Morse, q. b. 
Turner, 1. h. b. 
Blaney. r. h. b. 
Neale. Curran, f. b. 



1. 1., Cassidy 

I. e., Reed 

q. b.. Frame, Pierce 

r. h. b.. Tunck. Slaven 

1. h. b., Watkins 

f. b.. Smith. Keislick 



FOOTBALL. 

M. A. C, 6; UNiv. of Vermont, 6. 
Our team was robbed of a victory over the Ver- 
mont team a week ago Wednesday, by a long run by 
Slaven, who, with less than a minute more to play, 
broke away from the scrimmage, and ran 45 yards for 
a touchdown. Watkins tied the score by kicking the 

goal. 

Earlier in the same half we had scored six points, 
on a forward pass from Morse to Leonard, who ran 
20 yards for a touchdown, Turner kicking the goal. 
Our team clearly outplayed Vermont, keeping the ball 
in the latter' s territory most of the time. Part of the 
game was played when it was so dark that the officials 
could not see the holding by the Vermont line. Our 
team work was so excellent that it is impossible to 
select the stars. For Vermont, Slaven, and Watkins 
played best. 

The line-up: — 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Crossman, 1. e. 
Crosby. 1. t. 
Hazen. 1. g. 
Alger, c. 
Johnson, r. g. 



VERMONT. 

r. e.. Gebhart. Keishick. Buck 

r. t.. Clark, Dodge 

r. g.. Buckmiller 

c. Dodge. Thomas 

1. g.. Hughes 



Score— M. A. C. 6. Univ. of Vermont 6. Touchdowns- 
Leonard, Slaven. Goals— Turner. Watkins Referee— 
Keady. Dartmouth. Umpire— McLane. Dartmouth. Lines- 
men _Hosmer, M. A. C. Williams. Vermont. Timers — 
Monroe. Vermont. Thompson. M. A. C. Time— 20 minute 
halves. 



M. A. C, II ; W. P. I., 5. 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute was defeated in a 
fast game on the campus Saturday, Oct. 17. The 
day was exceedingly hot and the field was dry and 
dusty, making playing very disagreeable work. 
The visitors far outweighed our team, but the 
latter made up the difference with speed, although the 
effects of the recent Vermont game were apparent. 
The onside kick and the forward pass were tried 
frequently but on the whole without success, except 
the pass that gave us our first touchdown. 

Massachusetts kicked off to Tech. in the first half. 
The ball was kept in the Worcester fort of the field 
most of the half, but it was in our half at the end. 
Morse made a perfect pass to Blaney, who stepped 
over the line for the touchdown, the play completely 
deceiving the defenders of the goal. Captain Turner 
failed to kick the goal. 

Turner received the kickoff in the second half, and 
returned it well. Massachusetts advanced the ball to 
nearly the center of the field, where Schermerhorn 
punted to M. Halligan, who fumbled, and Captain 
Turner fell on the ball back of the line for a touch- 
down. He then kicked the goal. Score, 1 1-0, 

W. P. I. scored toward the end of the second half 
by assuming the aggressive, but it took them most of 
the half to do it. Cleveland finally carried the ball 
over, at the corner of the field. He kicked out to 
Clough, but no goal resulted from the fair catch. 
Schermerhorn put up the headline game, but was 
forced to retire after making a brilliant tackle. 
Blaney and Morse carried the ball well, while Captain 
Turner let nothing get by him. For Worcester, 
Captain Crowther, Clough, Powers, and Cleveland 
excelled. 



3* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









The line-up: — 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Turner (capt.). I. e. 

Crosby, I. t. 

Hazen, Walker, 1. g. 

Alger, c. 

Johnson, r. g. 

Schermerhorn. Partridge, r. t. 

Leonard, r. e. 

Morse, q. b. 

Neale. I. h. b. 

Blaney. r. h. b. 

Hosmer. f. b. 



w. P. I. 

r. 1., Brown 

r. t., Crowther (capt.) 

r, g.. Clough 

c , Spicer 

I. g . Glllett 

1. t.. Power 

I. e.. Reilley, Merrill 

q. b.. Bell. M. Halligan 

r. h. b.. B. Halligan 

I. h. b. Wiring. Cleveland 

f. b.. Blanchard 



Score— M. A. C. II. W. P. I. 5. Touchdown-Blaney. 
Turner, Cleveland. Coals from touchdown— Turner. Goals 
missed— Turner. Clough. Referee— Dr. Collins. Northamp- 
ton. Umpire— F. Donnelly. W. P. I. Linesmen— T. A. 
Barry. Damon, M. A. C. Holmes. W. P. I. Timer— Barry. 
Time — 20 minute halves. 

Reserves, 16; Holyoke High School, 2. 
In an Interesting game on the campus, Oct. 24, 
our Reserves defeated H. H. S. by the score, 16-2.' 
All of our scoring was done in the first half, and Hol- 
yoke's In the second. Warner was the star, block- 
ing three forward passes, and running 50 yards with one 
for a touchdown. He also tackled hard, and played 
a good offensive game. Merrill, Carpenter, and 
Bursley for the Reserves, and Shay and Stone for the 
visitors, excelled. 



RESERVE. 

Burke, (capt.). Prouty. 1. e. 

Caffrey. Nickerson, 1. t. 

Damon. Nickerson. Goldberg. 1. g. 

Bursley, c. 

Potter, Merrill, r. g; 

Carpenter, McLean, r. t. 

Nielson, r. e. 

Coash, Norris, q. b. 

Warner, Carpenter, 1. h. b. 

Corbett, Nickless. r. h. b. 

Merrill. Corbett. f. b. 



H. H. R. 

r. e , Diamond 

r. t.. Maloney 

r. g., Sheibel, Docherty 

c, Hemon 

1. g.. Hooks 

I t., Eaton 

1. e.. Burke 

q. b.. Stone 

r. h. b.. Shea (capt.) 

I. h. b., Richter 

f. b., Newell 

2. Umpire— Skinner of 



Score— Reserves 16, H. H. S. 
Holyoke. Referee- Jennison of M. A. C. Head linesman 
—Clarke. Linesmen— Prouty. Docherty, and Collingwood. 
Timer— Allen. Touchdowns— Warner, Merrill 2. Goals— 
Coash. Safety— Nielson. Time— 20 minute halves. 



BASEBALL CAPTAIN ELECTED. 

James R. O 'Grady has been elected baseball cap- 
tain for the season of 1909. He has played on the 
varsity team for three years, most of the time in the 
outfield. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



33 



SOCCER FOOTBALL. 

Efforts are being made to create an interest in 
soccer football, but nothing definite has been done 
about it yet. On Friday evening, Oct. 16, Donald 
North of Springfeld Training School addressed a 
meeting of those students who were interested in the 
subject, in the Union at North College. Dr. Rey- 
nolds introduced Mr. North, who gave a short but 
interesting account of the soccer game from its begin- 
nings in England in the third century A. D., to the 
present time. For centuries the game resembled a 
free fight, but since 1860 it has been governed by 
rules drawn up for the purpose at that time. 

Soccer has always been an English game, just as 
baseball is distinctively an American game, but about 
three years ago it was introduced into this country. 
There is now a league among some of the colleges, 
but other forms of athletics, especially Rugby, take 
most of the men from soccer. Mr. North, who was 
captain of the team that defeated Harvard, Yale, 
and other big colleges last year, advised us to try the 
game here, as he thought it would be easy to arrange 
games with other college teams. 

Dr. Reynolds then spoke and advised trying it 

but the number of men who responded to his call was 

so small that there is little likelihood of a team being 

started here and apparently the subject has been 

dropped. 



HANDICAP TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

The tennis tournament is well under way, all of the 
preliminaries having been played. Those still 
undefeated are: Johnson, 'II, Racicot, Rockwood, 
Wilson, Jen. Urban, Webb, Kenney, White, Codding, 
Brooks, Reynolds, Oppel, Johnson, '10, Cowles, and 
Regan. Johnson. '1 1 , and Reynolds have reached 
the second sound. 

This handicap tournament was started some time 
ago, with 32 entrants. A small entrance fee was 
charged, in order to enable the committee to award a 
cup to the victor. The handicap varies from even to 
30. The best two out of three sets constitutes a 
win. 



INDEXES GIVEN AWAY. 

C. N. Baxter, '98. offers to give anybody who 
cares to pay the express on them copies of the '96, 
'97, '98 and '99 Indexes. Address, Boston Athe- 
naeum, 10 1-2 Beacon St., Boston. 




Preparations for an entertainment by the senior 
class are under way. 

The senior class in botany was addressed a short 
time ago by R. E. Smith, 94, of California. 

D. F. Ingalls, '09, visited his home in Cheshire 
last week, attending also the Williams game. 

The last parcel of copy for the 1910 Indexes gone 
to Tuttle &. Co. Rutland, Vt. The Index is expected 
about Dec. 10. 

The Stockbridge Club at the meeting Tuesday eve- 
ning of last week discussed the Country Life work 
done by the National Committee. 

Last Friday evening a supper was served in the 
west entry of South College. A pleasant evening was 
reported to have been spent by all participants. 

A recent ruling of the Senate compels 
freshmen whether or not they have been freshmen in 
this or any other institution to wear the prescribed 
cap. 

A large number of students interested in politics 
attended the Democratic rally in Northampton last 
Friday evening. The Democratic Club sent represen- 
tatives. 

Manager R. C. Lindblad, '09, has started his 
practice in basketball. The baskets have been put 
up so that it is possible for the candidates to start 
shooting. 

The Mettawampe Club made a trek last Saturday to 
the rifle range some of the members doing some 
shooting. This was by special invitation from Capt. 
Geo.C. Martin. 

Norman D. Ingham, '05, is the author of a bulletin 
of the California Experiment Station entitled 
"Kucalyptus in California." Eucalyptus is the name 
of a tree imported from Australia and making good 
timber. 

The Republican Club attended the town political 
rally Wednesday evening in a body of 50 uniformed 
men. The rally was a splendid success and the part 
played in it by the students received hearty praise 
from the chairman of the town committee. 

The Republican Club has accepted the challenge 



of the democratic club to debate. The question 
i S> — Resolved that anti-injunctions as understood by 
the democratic platform are against the Republican 
Constitutional Government. Friday evening the club 
will hold a supper at Draper Hall at which there will 

be several prominent speakers. 

♦ 

CAMPUS CALENDAR. 
Oct. 29.— Y. M. C. A. at 7-00 in Chapel. 
Oct. 31.— Football, M. A. C. vs. Yale, New Haven. 
Nov. 1.— Vespers at 5-00 in Chapel. Speaker, Dr. 

Lyman Abbott, New York City. 
Nov. 3.— Stockbridge Club at 7-00. Election 

Day. 
Nov. 4. Assembly 1-30 in Chapel. Speaker, 

Director R. W. Stimson of Smith's 

Agricultural School, Northampton. 

Nov. 5.-Y. M. C. A. at 7-00 In Chapel. 

Nov. 7. Football, M. A. C. vs. N. H. State at 

Manchester. N. H. 
Nov. 8.— Vespers at 5-00 in Chapel. Speaker, Dr. 

W. W. Fenn of Harvard. 
Nov. 10.— Stockbridge Club at 7-00 p. m. 
Nov. I I.— Assembly 1-30 p. m. Chapel. 



INFORMAL. 

The first informal of the year was held Oct. 17, 
1908. Owing to unfortunate circumstances the 
attendance was small but the football game before 
and the splendid work of Mr. Allen and the commit- 
tee In decorating the drill hall made it a great suc- 
cess. A large flag was hung at one end. The cell- 
ing was draped with bunting and the hall was well 
filled with plants. In the centre the orchestra was 
hidden by a mass of palms. Derrick's orchestra 
furnished excellent music. The patronesses were 
Miss Joslin of Smith, Miss Morse of Mt. Holyoke, 
Mrs. H. T. Fernald, Mrs. Dr. McLauren, Mrs. Geo. 
C. Martin. The following students attended: 1909, 
A. W. Hubbard, John Noyes, Geo. F. Codding, G. 
R. Fulton, P. P. Cardin, R. C. Lindblad, C. R. 
Webb; 1910, R. H. Allen, L. R. Brandt, R. A. 
Waldron. W. Titus, E. J. Burke, L. S. McLaine, 
W. R. Clarke, L. C. Brown, L. S. Dickinson, S. C. 
Brooks; 1911, E. A. Larabee, E. W. Warren, C. 
R. Lodge, N. H. Hill, R. McNayr, G. P. Nicker- 
son, R. L. Whitney; 1912, W. F. Hennessy, 
W. J. Birdsall, J. W. Coville, Jesse Carpenter. 



34 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



35 




PHI KAPPA PHI ORATION— THE RESPON 
SIBILITY OF THE EDUCATED MAN. 

Dr. George E. Fellows, president of the University 
of Maine, delivered the annual Phi Kappa Phi ora- 
tion at Assembly, Wednesday, Oct. 21. Dean 
George F. Mills, president of the local chapter of 
Phi Kappa Phi presided. Dr. Fellows is president 
general of the fraternity. He took for the subject of 
his oration "The Responsibility of the Educated 
Man." The substance of his words were as follows : 

The work of the world is done by those who are 
willing and capable to assume or carry the responsibil- 
ity. Society will soon relieve the man who does not 
assume responsibility. All organizations are depend- 
ent upon this assumption of responsibility. Upon 
whom does this responsibility fall? This responsibility 
falls upon those whose talents and training have pre- 
pared them for it. Civilization cannot go faster than 
the educated men lead, water cannot rise higher 
than its source. The fastest runner is the one who 
sets the pace. The man in the van-guard of civiliza- 
tion is the most civilized man. Dr. Fellows here 
gave illustrations showing how the responsibility of 
studying and combating such diseases as the black 
death, yellow fever and the white plague lies with the 
educated man. He continued : The shirking of 
responsibility is a crime. We owe to every creature 
in existence, the fulness of what we are. Man can- 
not logically avoid responsibility for what he knows. 
If one has a station in life, inherited, sought or 
unsought, he must carry the responsibility. Does 
the educated man always recognize this truth? Let 
us contemplate some of the responsibilities of the 
modern man. Think of the engineer who is going 
to erect a building, build a ship or construct a bridge. 
A miscalculation in materials, in stresses or in con- 
struction may mean disaster to hundreds of human 
lives. But the effects of such a miscalculation are 
so sudden, so conspicuous that we give them more 
weight. The speaker alluded to the responsibility 
that is placed upon the surgeon when a human being 
comes under his knife. Then he continued i Educa- 
tion and responsibility go together. A monarch or 
chief of whatever name is responsible to those over 
whom he presides. One oi the responsibilities of the 
educated man is to see that those who are to rule 
are educated. The prince of the United States is 



the educated citizen, ready to come into an inherit 
ance. The educated man is responsible to th 
raising of the standards of the community 
in which he dwells. The great law that Nature ha:; 
prescribed for the earth is that the most educated 
and enlightened shall inherit the earth. Education 
has or should have taught that the most easily sough- 
ends are not the most desirable. The educated 
man is responsible for law, order and property rights 
and must make discriminations the uneducated man 
cannot make. The educated man is responsible for 
a clear conscience. The educated man is respon 
sible for success. The educated man is the heir of 
the ages. What shall the inheritance be? 

It was announced by Dean Mills that George Mur- 
ray Brown, Jr. of Cambridge is the first member of 
'09 elected to Phi Kappa Phi. Other elections will 
follow. 



COMMISSION ON COUNTRY LIFE. 

The commonwealth of Massachusetts ought to feel 
proud that a citizen is one of five chosen by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt a commission on country life. And 
Massachusetts Agricultural College ought to feel even 
prouder that not only is her president that citizen but 
that an alumnus, E. W. Allen, '85, is the executive 
secretary of the commission. The other members 
of the commission are: L. H. Bailey, Dean of the 
College of Agriculture of Cornell University. Chair- 
man; Henry Wallace, editor of Wallace's Farmer, 
Des Moines, la.; Walter H. Page of Doubleday. 
Page &Co., publishers, New York; Gifford Pinchot, 
Chief of the U. S. Forest Service. 

In order to secure the opinions and observations of 
farmers, teachers, ministers, business men and 
others on the general economic, social and sanitary 
conditions of country life and their suggestions as to 
what needs to be done to improve these conditions, 
the commission is printing and mailing a half million 
copies of a set of twelve questions asking for such 
information. The commission especially desires full 
discussion of these subjects. As stated in the fore- 
word: The general purpose of the Commission's 
work is to arrive at an understanding of conditions 
and of public opinion with regard to American country 
life as a basis for a report and recommendation to 
the President. 



The questions should set people thinking and also 

bring a good many helpful suggestions. The work 

I the Commission will be watched witn interest by 

M. A. C. men. The report to the President will 

undoubtedly comprehend much valuable information 

for those engaged in the new field of agricultural 

education, namely that of extension. 

«. 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '83. 
9. The Land Scrip. 

By the kind permission of the editors of "The 
College Signal," the series of historical sketches 
will be continued the present college year. The sub- 
jects, in addition to that of this sketch, will be : — 
••Course of Study and Instruction." "Student 
Labor," "Scholarships." " General Happenings." 
'•Scientific Work," and "Faculty Changes." 
Kffort will be made to have these sketches as reada- 
ble as the subject matter will permit. 

It seems desirable at this point to record the doings 
of Massachusetts in the disposition of her land scrip. 
The act donating public lands to the several States 
and Territories which might provide colleges for the 
benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts (U. S. 
Statutes, Vol. 12. Chap. 130, 1862) apportioned to 
each State an amount of public land equal to thirty 
thousand acres for each Senator and Representative 
in Congress. Massachusetts having twelve represen- 
tatives in Congress was allotted 360,000 acres but 
having no public lands available received instead from 
the Secretary of the Interior land scrip of the value 
of $1.25 per acre. 

Massachusetts accepted this grant of Congress by 
Acts of 1863, Chapter 166 and authorized Governor 
Andrew to receive all the land scrip to which the 
Commonwealth was entitled. He was also author- 
ized and instructed to appoint a commissioner whose 
duty it should be to locate, without unnecessary de- 
lay, all the land scrip which might come into posses- 
sion of the Commonwealth, and sell the same from 
time to time, and on such terms as the Governor and 
Council should determine. 

Hon. Charles G. Davis, for many years a mem 
ber of the Board of Trustees, stated in a historical 
address in 1887 that in May, 1864, Hon. Henry F. 



French of Cambridge (the first president of M. A. 
C.) was appointed by the Governor and Council agent 
of the State to sell the land scrip ; that he entered 
upon his duties with vigor, but that his work was 
an embarrassing one; that so much land scrip was 
thrown upon the market at once by the different 
States, that its market value was greatly decreased, 
so that he was able to realize fifty cents an acre only. 
The trustees of the college the following month, 
the importance of conferring special and distinct au- 
thority on an agent to dispose of the scrip having been 
stated, appointed Mr. French in behalf of the college 
to sell on such terms and to such persons as he might 
think proper, the several pieces of land scrip — 
numbered I to 225 inclusive,- with full power to 
execute legal assignments thereof and to affix thereto 
the college seal. Prior to this action the Council had 
authorized the commissioner to sell the scrip for cash 
only and that no sales should be made at a price less 
than eighty cents per acre. In August 1866, how- 
ever, the Council ordered that the commissioner be 
authorized to dispose of the scrip from that date at 
the minimum rate of seventy cents an acre. 

Early in 1867 the Council took the position that all 
of the unsold scrip should be constantly kept under 
the immediate control of the Treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth and in secure vaults or safes, and there- 
fore ordered that Mr. French be instructed forthwith 
to return to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth all 
certificates which he might have in his possession or 
under his control. A committee of the Council, to 
whom had been referred the subject matter of the 
sale of the scrip belonging to the Commonwealth, 
reported that they had met by appointment commit- 
tees of the trustees of the Agricultural College and the 
Institute of Technology and that after a full inter- 
change of opinion it was, at said interview, unani- 
mously voted to advise a sale of the scrip under the 
direction of the Governor and Council, and recom- 
mendation was made that in the disposal of the same 
the Treasurer of the Commonwealth advertise for 
proposals for the purchase of said scrip. 

About a week later the Council directed the State 
Treasurer to deliver to Nathan Durfee, then treas- 
urer of M. A. C. and commissioner to make sale of 
the land scrip, seven hundred pieces. The day fol- 
lowing this action the Council approved a contract 



• 



36 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



37 








between Mr. Durfee and G. F. Lewis of Cleveland, 
Ohio, for that number of pieces of land scrip for the 
sum of $60,480.00, representing 112,000 acres 
of land at fifty-four cents per acre, Later Mr. 
Durfee sold the same party six hundred pieces for 
$55,680.00. or fifty-eight cents per acre, and seventy 
pieces to other parties at the same rate. 

There appears in the Council Records, under date 
of January 10, 1868, a report by Mr. Durfee con- 
cerning the 1 ,370 pieces of land scrip representing 
219,200 acres, received by him from the Treasurer 
of the Commonwealth; also an entry to the effect 
that as Mr. Durfee had sold all of said scrip belong- 
ing to the Commonwealth and had paid into the 
Treasury of the Commonwealth the proceeds of same, 
$122,656.00, it was ordered that the Treasurer be 
requested to cancel and return to the said Nathan 
Durfee the bond which he gave to the Commonwealth 
for the performance of his duties as commissioner. 

In the annual report of the trustees in January, 
1866, President French had stated that 136,480 
acres had been sold for $110,864.80, being an 
average of about 81 1-4 cents per acre. Their 
financial statement of January 1, 1868, gave $236,- 
307.40 as the total amount received from the sale of 
the 360,000 acres of land allotted Massachusetts ; 
that of this amount, $29,778.40 had been expended 
for a farm ; that the investments of the fund made by 
the Treasurer of the Commonwealth were almost 
wholly in bonds, and that the annual income of the 
fund at six per cent was $12,445.45, of which the 
college received two-thirds, or $8,296.99. 

It should be recalled that the act incorporating the 
trustees of the college provided that one-tenth part of 
the money received should be paid to th2 college 
and appropriated towards the purchase of a site or 
farm ; also that when the college should become 
duly organized, located and established, it should 
receive two-thirds of the annual interest or income 
received from this land grant fund, and that the 
other one-third was to be diverted to the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology in Boston. The Act of 
Congress specifically provided that no portion of said 
fund, nor the interest thereon, should be applied, 
directly or indirectly, under any pretence whatever, 
to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of 
any building or buildings. 



It may be of interest in this connection to call at 
tention to resolutions based upon a memorial by the 
Massachusetts Board of Agriculture and passed by 
the Massachusetts Legislature of 1862 (Chap. 43). 
to the effect that Massachusetts deemed it expedient 
and just that Congress appropriate a portion of the 
public lands to establish and endow a National Nor- 
mal Agricultural College, which should oe to the 
rural sciences what West Point academy was to the 
military, for the purpose of educating teachers and 
professors for service in all the States and Republic. 



SMITH'S AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL AND 

NORTHAMPTON SCHOOL OF 

TECHNOLOGY. 

President Roosevelt asks : 

"How can life on the farm be kept on the highest 
level, and where it is not already on that level, be so 
improved, dignified and brightened as to awaken and 
keep alive the pride and loyalty of the farmer's boys 
and girls, of the farmer's wife, and of the farmer him- 
self? How can a compelling desire to live on the 
farm be aroused in the children that are born on the 
farm? All these questions are of vital importance 
not only to the farmer, but to the whole nation. " 

This is a part of the problem Smith's Agricultural 
School and Northampton School of Technology is 
helping to solve. The school has published a recent 
hand book from which the Signal takes the liberty to 
extract information of interest to its readers. 

"Smith's Agricultural School and Northampton 
School of Technology" is the official title of the new 
independent industrial School now established by the 
city of Northampton. This school opened for 
instruction Oct. 1 , 1908. To its uses will be devoted 
the proceeds of a fund bequeathed to Northampton 
for an agricultural school by Oliver Smith, — a fund 
which, in accordance with the will of the donor, had 
been allowed to accumulate for sixty years, and 
which, when it became available, Dec. 2, 1905, 
amounted to $310,660.39. The equipment and 
policy of the school have been approved by the Mas- 
sachusetts Commission on Industrial Education, and 
one-half of the annual maintenance appropriation of 
$20,000 made by the city will be received from the 
State, as provided for by law, Chapter 505. of the 
Acts 1906, on certificate of the Commission. First 
of Its kind in important respects, this new school will 



still embody tw) time-honored factors in American 
education, local enterprise and state support. 

Preparation for certain kinds of work and manage 
ment will be the primary aim of this new school. It 
will provide training in agriculture with a view to prac- 
tical and profitable farming ; in household economy, 
with a view to efficient and enjoyable housekeeping 
and home-making; and in mechanic arts, as either a 
foundation for desirable apprenticeships in the case of 
boys who enter at fourteen years of age, or as prepa- 
ration for the work of journeymen or foremen in the 
case of students more mature. Whatever a public 
industrial school of such breadth of curriculum and of 
equal resources, can do, this new school will endeavor 
to do toward making work more intelligent, better 
directed, and better done. 

A subordinate aim will be to provide competent 
preparatory training for those students who desire to 
go on to higher institutions devoted to agriculture, or 
the household arts. The school will provide equally 
good preparation for those desirous of training, at one 
or another of the State normal schools, for teaching 
nature subjects. 

Attention in all courses will be paid to preparation 
for good citizenship. Each course will aim to graduate 
young men and young women acquainted with some, 
at least, of the best things which have been thought 
and said and done in the world, schooled to thrift and 
industry, appreciative no less of nobility of conduct 
than of accurate and skilful workmanship, young 
people who, wheresoever in future they may be found, 
shall be capable in their vocations, broadly intelli- 
gent, and in all things clean and highminded. 

The methods of the school are those comprehended 
in school practice, school and farm, school and shop, 
school and home and public exhibitions. Text- 
books and tuition are free to all students who are 
residents of Northampton. The fee for students 
from other Massachusetts towns or cities is one hun- 
dreds dollars a school year to be paid by the towns in 
which these students reside. One-half of the sum 
paid by any town will be repaid to that town by the 
state. The school opened Oct. 1 in the Old High 
School Building with more than 100 in attendance. 
The permanent location of the school will be on 
Locust street, adjacent to Dickinson hospital. To 
the west and south of the Dickinson hospital the 
School owns about one hundred acres of land. This 
lies between Locust and Elm streets, scarcely more 
than a mile from the City Hall, and cost some $20,- 
000. On the middle of a table-land of sixteen acres, 
which commands a view of Mt. Tom to the south, 
the first building of the School is now being erected, 
a large red brick structure trimmed with limestone, 
two hundred feet long by nearly two hundred feet 
deep through Its central section. 



Y. M. C- A. N<vUs. 



The Association urges every student to avail him- 
self of the rare opportunity of hearing some of the 
best speakers in the country at the Sunday Vespers. 
Tnese services are non-sectarian, the purpose being 
to uplift the morals of college men. Is not such a 
service worth one hour of a man's time per week ? 
Think it over and make up your mind to improve 
your opportunity and better your life. 

It is hoped that the men will seriously consider the 
arguments so clearly and emphatically brought out 
in the article entitled "Bible Study for the College 
Man," contributed by W. E. Hinds. M. A. C. '99. 
The article appeared in the Signal of October 14th. 
Read it. Through the generosity of Mr. Newton 
Shultis, M. A. C. '97, several new books have been 
addea to the Y. M. C. A. library. Some men are 
making good use of the hooks. Others should look 
them over and see if they are worth while. 

George M. Brown has been sent as a delegate to 
the Bible Study Conference hold at Columbus, Ohio. 
In addition to the college contingent 200 of the most 
important Christian workers of this and other lands 
and prominent alumni interested in association work 
will be in attendance, making a total of about 1,200 
men. Our delegate will bring back enthusiasm and 
plans which will serve as a stimulus in making the 
College Bible Study more effective. 



Dfp&r-tm* rvf ^lot?s. 



HORTICULTURE. 

The last monthly crop report of the Massachusetts 
State Board of Agriculture contains an excellent 
illustrated treatise on the Renovation of Old Orchards 
by Professor Sears. The forthcoming report will 
have an illustrated article by Professor Waugh on 
Strawberry Culture. 

Work on the new greenhouses and floriculture build- 
ing has been progressing splendidly on account of 
the fine weather. The roof-work on the green- 
houses is nearly all up, and the wails of the laboratory 
are nearing completion. 

Professor White has taken charge of his classes 
and Mr. Bishop has returned to his home in 
Waltham. 

Professor Sears addressed the State Horticultural 
Society of New Hampshire at its annual meeting 
last week. 

Professor Waugh 's new book is nearly ready for 



38 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



39 






distribution. It will be entitled "The American 
Apple Orchard" and will be published by Orange Judd 
Co., New York. 

The Division is fortunate in securing Miss Edith 
C. Hubley as secretary in place of Miss Cornelia B. 
Ball recently married to Walter B. Hatch, '05. 

Shipments of fruit are now being received almost 
daily by the Department of Pomology. These are 
used in part by the class in systematic pomology and 
in part by Mr. J. K. Shaw in his experimental 
investigations. 

The work of the Commission on Grounds goes on 
speedily. Extensive detail surveys of the College 
property have been made by the Department of Land- 
scape Gardening, the work being done by John 
Noyes, '09. The Commission held a meeting in 
Boston Oct. 24 to hear the report of Warren H. 
Manning, landscape architect. In this connection it 
is interesting to know what Mr. Manning thinks of thg 
work here. In a recent letter he says, referring to 
Mr. Noyes' surveys : 

"During the past week 1 have been busily engaged 
on the study of the Agricultural College grounds over 
your survey. 1 think never have I received a survey 
from outside sources and seldom have had one pre- 
pared in my own office that was more full in the 
details that are essential in an intelligent study for the 
development of a property. 1 think you have done 
extremely well, especially as Mr. Taylor and myself 
did not have much time to go over details with you." 
MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 
The following appointments and promotions have 
been made : 

To be Sergeant- Major— Sergt. R. H. Allen, Co. C. 
Quartermaster- Sergt.— Sergt. D. E. Bailey, 

Co. A. 
Color Sergts.— Sergt. L. G. Schermerhorn, 
Co. B and Sergt. J. P. Blaney, Co C. 
Sergeants in Co. A — L. S. McLaine and W. 

C. Johnson. 
Sergeants in Co. C— A. F. Rockwood and 
G.Paulsen. 
The following lance corporals are advanced to the 
rank of Corporal and will remain on duty with pres- 
ent companies; I. C. Gilgore, F. A. McLaughlin, 
E. A. Larrabee.R. S. McNayr, G. E. Laboutelay. 
To be Corporal in Co. A— Ralph Henry Armstrong. 
Co. B — James Fowler Adams. 
Co. C— T. Bean and H. B. Morse. 



Alu 



mm. 



'85.— Dr. George H. Barber of Chelsea, a sur- 
geon in the United States navy has been granted a 
divorce from nis wife on the grounds of separation 
for more than ten years. 

'86. — Richard B. Mackintosh of Peabody was at 
college recently, and promised to give the College 
Library some valuable historical matter relating to 
the college. 

'92. — H. L. Crane, Westwood. 
'94.— Change of address, Elias D. White, Rail 
way Mail Service. 298 Hull St.. Athens. Gi. 

'95. — The marriage of William Chy Brown to 
Miss Jacobs of Peabody is announced. Mr. Brown 
was the popular leader of the band and orchestra 
while in coliege. Miss Jacobs is the daughter of a 
wealthy retail merchant. 

'95, — H. D. Hemenway of Northampton, who 
has made an extensive study of Children's Garden 
Work, has sent out circulars announcing several 
illustrated lectures, which he has prepared, concern- 
ing children's gardens, our common trees and lawn 
decorations. 

'95.— The Plant of the Consolidated Electric 
Lamp Co. at Danvers, of which Jasper Marsh is 
treasurer, and which suffered from a severe fire in 
the summer, has been rebuilt on a much larger scale. 
It is now one of the largest factories in the United 
States for the manufacture of the Electric Incandes- 
cent lamp. 

'96.— Change of address, Dr. I. C. Poole. 204 
High St., Fall River. 

Ex-'96. — J. E. Green of Berkeley, Cal., became, 
on Oct. 8, the proud father of triplets, two boys and 
a girl. 

'99. — W. E. Chapin, 79 Lincoln Ave., New 
London, Conn. 

'99. — W. A. Hooker. U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Washington. D. C. 

'00. — M. A. Campbell. Townsend. 
Ex-'Ol .— W. B. Rogers. 365 Main St., Stoneham. 
'03. — S. C. Bacon, assistant engineer on Tunnel 
Construction for the Hudson Companies of New York, 
60 Warren Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



'04. J. W. Gregg, The Baron de Hirsch School, 

Woodbine, N. J. 

•05.— Married. Oct. 14, Miss Helen Amelia 
Krickson and Harvey Davis Crosby. At home after 
Dec. I, Thompson, Conn. 

•05.— The Experiment Station of the University 
of California has issued a bulletin entitled "The Euca- 
lyptus in California," written by N. D. Ingham. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ingham visited college recently. 

Ex-'05.— Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Tinkham visited 
college while on their wedding tour. 

•05.— G. N. Willis, 124 Oxford St., Cambridge. 

'05. — The Cornell Experiment Station has issued 
a bulletin by A. D. Taylor entitled, Street Trees, 
their Care and Preservation. 

•06. F. A. Cutter, Practical Scientific Forestry, 

Box 999. Orange. N.J. 

'06. — R. W. Peakes, 7 Walnut St., Newtonville. 

06.— W. C. Tannatt, Jr., civil engineer. 116 
Tonawanda St., Dorchester. 

'07.— A. W. Higgins visited college lately. 

•07. — J. N. Summers has returned from his 
vacation. 



•07. — F. A. Watkins has been spending a few 
days at college. 

'08. — H. E. Alley is spending a few days in 
Amherst. 

•08. — Married, Oct. 22, at Amherst, Miss Bertha 
M. Bolles and Raymond H. Jackson. Mr. Jackson 
is now employed in the firm of Jackson & Cutler, of 
which his father is senior partner. 

'08. — K. E. Gillett visited college last week. 

'08. — Married, Oct. 16, Miss Mabel Katherine 
Farrar and Samuel Judd Wright. 

'08. — E. D. Phillbrick was in Amherst recently. 

'08. — Joseph Wellington, who has accepted a 
position at the Geneva Experiment Station, New 
York, visited college a week ago. 

'08. — C. C. Gowdy is in Barbados. 

Ex-' 1 1 men have been reported as follows s 

E. L. Daniels, C. P. Hammond, R. A. Denslow 
at the University of Michigan. 

W. M. Loker, working in Framingham. 

C. E. Coles, working in Mansfield. 

John Becker and G. H. Robb at M. I. T. 
G. A. Tilton at Princeton. 

D. B. Young at Amherst. 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 
3 ft. by 6 ft., --- - $4.00 

Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DEUEL'S X>RUO STOKK 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









40 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAIIyOW «TOW*J 

II AMITY STRERT, - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, lit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. TlLIPHOMI 544. 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
PROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

"AILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS 



Intkk-Cou.koiatk Hukkau of Acadkmk COSTUME 

College Caps and Gowns. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 

JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Cloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



Rabar's Jim, 

ol<l South .Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, HAM 

MimIitii Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Heiiutifnl Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB, DAT. 

When in " llamp." stop with us. 



TUP: BEST VLACR TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



It's Your Next at the 





[ 




Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 7 a. m. to 8 i\ m. 

Tuesdays 7 " 6 " 

Wednesdays, 7 " 8 •• 

Thursdays, 7 " 6 " 

Fridays, 7 " 8 " 

Saturdays, 7 " u " 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Cenuine l'eruvian (luano Pase. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our FertUlier Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
tlir Colltgt Signal. 



"For the 



Land's Sake" 



THE HE-' 



a4-26 Stone Street, 





NKW YORK. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dralcrs in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It la generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRIOHT & iSlTSON 
have the beat looking. 
best fitting and moat 
durable aults. 

The WRIOMT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
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( \ rALOGUE FREE 

WRICiHT «A? DITSON 

•544 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

iH WEST pth ST.. NKW YOU 

Chicago Phovummh k, K. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




USE 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections (tired to our 

UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

1£. A. 1 A IK>l\lI*«OIV, 

Rear First National Hank, AMHERST 




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Makers to 06, 07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns ami Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

2C2 Fourth Aw , Nkw York. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Connecticut valley street Baiiway Co. 

AMHER8T DIVISION. 

Curb will leave Ainheratan<l Northampton on the hour uml 
hair hour from tf 30 a. u. till 10.30 p.m. Sundays the first car 
will leave at k.SO a.m. 

Main Office, Ukeenkibi.d, Mash. 
John A.Taggart, Supt. 

NORTHAMPTON OFFICE, 102 MAIN ST. 

C. W. Clapp, A»»t. Supt. Telephone, Northampton, 136-12. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To aartt your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Oppositb Town Hall. 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherpt. 



WANTED 

college: men and women 

to act as our Sales Agents. Earn enough during the sum 
mer to pay your expenses for the next year. Our prop., 
sition Often 40% profit. No capital required. Write for 
full particulars. Catalogue and samples free. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS COMPANY 
1209 W. Taylor St., Chicago, 111 . 

C. S. OATM^S, I3.I3.». 

DENTAli SOOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - - - - AMHERST, MASS. 

OFFICE HOURS: 
9 TO IS .A.. Xwt-» 1-30 TO 6 F»- M- 

Ether and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered when deeired 



Central Yermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO JAN. 1, 1908. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, ami 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 




WEBSTER'S ^ 

INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONARY 

A EJBRARV IN om: BOOK. 

Besides an accurate practical, a:id suhoHrly 
vocabuluv Of English, with 2^.C'ja M:W 
WOKOS, the Interr.:-tio:-...l contai?i3 aliistory of 
the English Language, Guide- to Pronuv.cUUon, 
Dictiona'-y of Fic'.ion. liuwO.aieticor, New Blo- 
gruphic:il Dictionary.Vocabul ry of Ccr.yture, 
Greek and Latin Names, English Christian 
Names, Foreign Quotations, Abbreviations, Etc. 

b:iso iv\«;i;s. booo ii.i.i stkations. 
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WKltHTI K'S <oU.l...lAli: W< TIONALY. 
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WOODWARDS LUNCH. 

W Main St.. Noimhami-ion. 

Masonic. Block, nrur 1 ►.•put, i i|«-n e\ ci \ 'Iny. 

Lunches, GoatMttoMry, Clean Noted for its exc.ii.nt 
oyster .Stew mot t lam Chowder. 

deaad only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUKA! TDKKK OK 

«OX>A WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon ami German Tonic, Hlrch Heer ami QUsgW 
Ale. Fountain* charged to order 



KlVKK STREET, 



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Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



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TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



M. A. C. '82, 



FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amhkhst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone <»r call. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR. 

lias received the latest fabrics for the spring anil summer 

trade <>f '07 In GentlaotM*! QaroMats. Also do** LmHn' 

(iarmeni* in a satisfactory nianuei 

Cleaning, Altering, la-pairing 

and Prenting promptly done. 

Sfc^— Military Work I Speeialty.^0| 
Under the Post Oltice, - - Amhkkst, Mass. 

AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New ami Up-to- Dale. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SKKVICKS AT KKASONAHI.K PRICES. 

D. H. KENDIiWK, Projmetor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



!VI. A. C v . A.«'t, 



O. K.wmiit, •<>»» 



Oct Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
h " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

i^HATISFAOTION a^tJ.A.ItA.lslTBBr^.«'Cr-»*■ 
H. A. VTI.KY, Manager, 

OK KICK, 

T.ngt Pleasant Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THE 

COLLEGE 



• TOK13. 



The Children »re lla|i|>>. 
Because tlieir ololhes nre niHile on the Nk.w Home KEwlNO 

Machixe, which fact, aaa«re« then «i do M rt»a." Mother* 
should ketone at out e n» it will do for their children in years 
to come. Oealers Kvery where. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some (lowers. Better than candy for results. 



OF HORTICULTURE, I, A. C. 



Telephone. 



Akthur E. Dokk. 



L. H. Toi:rtki.ottk. 



ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

Wllol.hSAI.K DKALKU8 AND .loltllKKH IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, ANB VEAL. 

We cordially invite u inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College CI ■■■Oil. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



Uniforms 
for all 
Athletic 
Sport* 



Gymnasium 
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for all 
Track and 
Field Sports 

Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue of 

all sports contains numerous suggestions 

Mailed free anywhere 

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Syracuse Baltimore Detroit Cleveland 

Washington St. Loaii MoattmLCaa. London, Eng. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Clans and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 



142 Main Street, 



Northampton, Mass 



Tel. 3:52-2. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

(Masks' BARN, NBAS EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection. AMHERST, MASS 



J. H.TROTT 



PLWEfl, STEP t BHS FITTER, 

IU DEALER II STOVES RAD RANGES. 



Shop 15 r-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 3d- 12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders. Left at Amherst HoMf Will Receive Prompt Attention 



KSTAItl.lsHKl' 1861. 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLKTK LINK OK BOOM 
SUITED TO THK STl'DENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

206-211 Third Ave., cor. lHth Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMl'OUTEKB AND MAM I M 1IIU.KH OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 

We linmlle UN >>est of 
EVKRYTH1NO NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



LET 



'BILL 



TRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

II. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



J. A. 

PLEASANT ST.. 



TURNER. 

OVER AMHERST BAKERY 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON. MAS8. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKK. MASS. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Kanquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. HOWKKR A CO. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



CA*wra & notf hous*. 
rWT&S, ' 



ArtHa$t , Aa$$. 


















THE*— ^t:- 

flfoassacbueetts 



Bgricultural 

(Lolleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFER: 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at U-ust sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two- weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2. A FOUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
ChemiBtry, Zo6logy, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



HE COLLEGE MB AL 



'OL. 19 



NO. 4- 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS.. NOVEMBER 11, 1908 




i, 



I 






I 



I 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



page's Sboe Store 

Next to Post Office. 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



E. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, JWAIflDOlilN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



THE MANAGER OF THIS PAPER USES A 

Smith Premier 
Typewriter 

AND IS PLEASED TO SAY THAT IT GIVES 

Perfect Satisfaction. 



0CCULI8T8 PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



HURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 
M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER II. 1908 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Co_lhg_ Signal, A_h_«st, Mass. Th« Siohal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. - 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BR1GGS, 1909. Business Manager. 

W. R. CLARKE, 1910. Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON. 1910. Assistant Business Manager. 
R C POTTER. 1909. College Notes. L C. BROWN. 1910. Athletic Notes. 

M. F. GEER. 1909. Ahim.ii Notes. H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Department Notes. 

C H WHITE. 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notes. A. H. SHARPE. 1911. 

S. R. PARSONS. 191 1. 



Tama: »l.oo per uear in adeance. Single Copiea, 10c. Poataga outaide ol United Statea and Canada. 8§c a«tra. 



The Union. 
Ath'etic Board. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket-Ball Association. 
Base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

H. W. Turner, Pres. Colege Senate 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke. Manager. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index, 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad. Pres. 
F. T. Haynes. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Poet Office at Amherst. 
«_%rt-i\« - _%»\»»«v »%\<m»%. 



ON TO SPRINGFIELD! 



El di-tb rials. 



Seven games have been played, three won, three 
lost and one tied. Two of the three won were played 
on the campus with the long yell and the short ringing 
in the ears of the players. The team did not play 
those games alone. Every man on the side-lines 
was passing and punting and plunging and the surge 
of two hundred Intellects working simultaneously 
threw opposing guards and tackles off their feet, put 
swift spirit into our backs, and new life into the whole 
machine. The team is working hard. It is playing 
against odds. But we are going to back it to the 
finish. Saturday we line up against Springfield Train- 
ing School. Where will you be when the whistle 
blows? 



The long talked of game with Yale has been played 



and lost. The score was the largest that any college 
has ever been able to make against us. Two very 
regrettable circumstances were responsible for this 
fact. The first was the crippled condition of our 
men. This was, of course, unavoidable, and to be 
expected after the hard Williams game. The sec- 
ond cause of our seemingly overwhelming defeat was 
one that had no right to exist. We have no positive 
proof, from a legal standpoint, that it did exist. 
However that may be, we are morally certain that 
the game was allowed to be extended an appreciable 
length of time beyond the agreed-upon limit, by the 
presumably neutral officials. Competent time-keep- 
ers among the Massachusetts supporters timed the 
game, and assert that the first half was prolonged to 
forty- eight minutes, and the second to thirty-four. 
That would account for about sixteen points, so that 
thirty-three would represent Yale's total if they had 



4 2 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



43 














not been so anxious to exceed William's score. 
Holding Yale down to thirty- three points is an 
extremely creditable performance, and our only regret 
is that the avarice of the football authorities at Yale 
led them to adopt measures that dimmed the glory of 
our defeat. 



Erratum :— Contrary to statement in the last issue 
of the Signal, there has been no election to the base- 
ball captaincy for 1909. 



/Uhletic N°*«- 



FOOTBALL. 

Williams, 40; M. A. C. 0. 
Our team was severely defeated Saturday, Oct. 
24, at Williamstown. Our line was rather weak, 
Schermerhorn being greatly missed. The injuries he 
received in the Worcester game kept him out of this 
one. We were able to hold Williams for downs just 
once, and also made our distance once, both of these 
events coming near the close of the second half. 
Williams had the ball most of the time, as we were 
forced to punt frequently. Theirs was a line-smash- 
ing game, for their forward passes usually resulted In 
a penalty. Sixty yards was lost in this way. 

Alger at center played the star game for us. His 
tackling and general defensive work was excellent. 
Captain Turner punted well, and Morse returned 
punts in good shape. 

The line-up. 



M. A. C. 

Leonard, r. c. 
Johnson, r. t. 
Walker, r. g. 
Alger, c. 

Hazen, Robinson, 1 
Crosby. 1. t. 
Turner, 1. e. 
Morse, q. b. 
Blaney. r. h. b. 
Curran. 1. h. b. 
Hosmer, Neale. f. b. 
Score— Williams. 
4, Brown 2. Morse, 
of Amherst College. 



WILLIAMS. 

1. e.. Winter 

1. t.. Swain 

1. g.. Harter 

c, Morse. Jamieson 

g. r. g.. G. Rogers 

r. t. Brooks 

r. e.. Pratt 

q. b., Williams 

1. h. b., Robb 

r. h. b., C. Rogers. Englehard 

f. b.. Brown 

40; M. A. C. 0. Touchdowns— Robb 
Goals— Morse 5. Referee. Washburn 
Umpire— Curtin of Pittsfield. Lines- 



men, Seeley of Williams, Brown of Amherst, Mason of Wil- 
liams. Time— 25 minute halves. 



Yale, 49; M. A. C. 0. 
(Special to the Signal.) 
Our team was not in shape for a hard game when 
it went against Yale on Saturday, Oct. 31. Scher 
merhorn had not fully recovered from the Worcester 
game ; Blaney, Curran and Crossman had bad ankles; 
Willis had returned to college and football less than a 
week before, and Manager Thompson had gone out 
only as an emergency man. But with this crippled 
team and subs., we gave Yale one or two gooa 
scares. Twice goals from the field were tried, but 
both attempts failed. Not a kick was blocked on 
either side. Yale made most of their gains through 
tackle and guard in the first half, while in the second. 
with a team composed of second-string men, they 
frequently worked the ends to good advantage. 
Their backfield did most of the work, Coy, Philbin. 
Brides, and Daly starring. Man for man, Yale out- 
weighed us from 40 to 100 pounds. We made our 
distance once, but forced Yale to kick numerou: 
times. Yale fumbled frequently, and in nearly every 
case a Massachusetts man was there to fall on it. 
On the other hand, we fumbled only once. Our 
forward passes failed to work, due to hurry and con- 
sequent inaccuracy. Our only attempted onside kick 
also failed. Numerous Yale forward passes and 
onside kicks were intercepted by our men. 

Willis played a good game, as did Schermerhorn, 
Alger, and Crosby. Morse caught all the punts tha; 
came his way, and ran them back well. His tack- 
ling and that of Turner were the features. 

Toward the latter part of the game our line began 
to play too high, and were then easily pushed back; 
for gains. But so long as our men were fresh the 
Yale line did not show up any better than did our line. 
The plays were as follows : — Crosby kicked off tc 
Philbin, who fumbled, Turner recovering the ball 
on Yale's 25 yard line. After Crosby had made 2 
around tackle, a forward pass on the place kick form- 
ation was tried. Leonard could not reach it, but 
recovered it in time to keep Yale from getting it. 
After the penalty of 15 yards, Schermerhorn punted, 
and Yale returned the ball to their 20 yard line. Coy 



made 10 through left guard, then punted with the 
wind to the center of the field. Willis made 4 at 
left tackle, Hosmer 2 at end. Our punt was fum- 
bled, and Leonard dropped on it on Yale's 22 yard 
line. Turner attempted a goal, but it went low and 
wide. After one tackle play, Yale punted. Morse 
returned it 20 yards to the 38 yard line. Willis dug 
1 yard out at center, Hosmer lost 6, Schermerhorn 
punted, and the ball came back to the 32 yard limit. 
A series of hard line smashes and long end runs 
brought the ball to our yard line on the third down. 
One more rush did it, ten minutes after the play 
started. The kick-out was fairly caught, but the 
goal was missed. Score, 0-5. 

The second kick-off went outside and was repeated. 
Brought to Yale's 40 yard line. Coy made 10. 
Brides 8, then Crosby threw them for a loss. Morse 
made a fair catch on the punt, Schermerhorn punted 
immediately, Philbin fumbled, and Turner fell on it 
on Yale's 42 yard line, but his attempted goal failed. 
Yale began another series of long gains through our 
line, but soon fumbled, Massachusetts getting the 
ball. Schermerhorn again kicked, Crosby making a 
pretty tackle. A tackle play brought the ball to our 
40 yard line. Another 6 points soon resulted, 23 
minutes after the first kickoff. Score, 0-11. 

Yale again received, Thompson tackling on the 
28 yard line. A long punt went to Morse on our 30 
yard line. Willis made 5, but a fumble lost 7. 
Schermerhorn kicked, against a strong wind, the ball 
finally being downed at the center of the field. The 
Yale gains averaged only about 5 yards for a while, 
but soon lengthened out to 10 or 12. With one yard 
to go, the ball was carried over, but not downed. It 
was pushed back, and the touchdown was allowed. 
No goal. 0-16. 

Brides received, ran back 20 yards. Hobbs made 
good gains in several tandem plays. Yale fumbled 
5 yards beyond the middle of the field, Neale getting 
it. The line was beginning to show the effects of 
the hammering, and Yale's line broke through and 
threw Crosby for a loss. Our punt was returned to 
the center of the field. Crosby bruised his shoulder 
severely, but stayed in. Coy made a long end run, 
followed by long plunges through tackle. Time was 
taken out for Yale at this point, but it was only a 



case of torn clothing. Touchdown, no goal. Score, 
0-21. 

Crosby's next kickoff rolled over the line. Yale 
punted out from the 25 mark, Hosmer returning it 
5 yards. No gain at left tackle. Schermerhorn's 
punt was high but short, and the strong wind reduced 
its distance to 12 yards. Yale returned it 10, then 
an onside kick failed, Morse recovering it for our 
team. Right here we made our only first down of 
the game. The half ended with the ball in our hands 

on our 35 yard line. Score, 0-21. 

Second half:— Neale ran the kick-off back 10 
yards. Offside play by Yale gave us 5, but an 
attempted forward pass lost 15, putting us on our I I 
yard line. Schermerhorn punted 40 yards, Yale 
brought it back to our 45 line, and rushed It 
over three minutes after the half began. The goal 
was kicked. Score, 0-27. 

Crossman replaced Turner at left end, the latter 
going to full. Willis retired. 

Yale received. Our line held better, and Yale 
punted 50 yards. Morse returned it 10 yards. 
The first rush resulted in a loss, so Schermerhorn 
punted under difficulties, the wind driving the ball 
back nearly to its starting-place. Time out for 
Schermerhorn. Yale fumbled, Turner getting the 
ball. Our right tackle punted 40 yards, and a fair 
catch was made by Yale on her 42 yard mark. A 
minute later a long run around left end brought the 
score up to 0-32. 

Schermerhorn retired, Johnson taking his place, 
and Walker was put in Johnson's. 

Crosby kicked off. A double pass gave Yale a 
long gain around left end. Alger was hurt, and 
Robinson replaced him. Yale's puni came to our 
30 yard line, and our return kick rolled to their 25 
yard mark. They lost 5 on a punt formation, then 
made 4, ?nd punted. Morse could not reach it in 
lime, and a Yale man broke away with the ball under 
his arm, but Morse overtook him in less than ten 
yards. An attempted forward pass struck the ground 
but was recovered by Yale. Yale was pushed back 
from our 5 yard line, but finally scored. Goal. 
Score, 0-38. 

Yale returned Crosby's kick to their 27 yard line. 
Hazen replaced Thompson. A 15 yard penalty 









44 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



45 



helped us some. More gains by Yale, then Blaney 
took Neale's place. Hosmer nailed an onside kick 
30 yards from our goal. Turner punted, Blaney 
tackling on Yale's 53 yard mark. Ten around right 
end, and a second later a long forward pass rolled 
over the goal line for a touchback. Morse punted 
from the 25 yard line, but Yale by steady gains of 
from 3 to 12 yards scored again. Goal was kicked. 
Score, 0-44. 

Crossman made a good tackle on the next kickoff. 
A gain of 10 through left tackle, another of 20 
through the other tackle, and a series of shorter gains 
brought the total score up to 0-49, where it remained. 
Yale returned the next kick 45 yards, Morse finally 
getting the man just as he was breaking loose. A 
fumble on a forward pass gave Hosmer the ball. 
Morse punted, and a minute later he fell on the ball, 
when Yale again fumbled on our 30 yard line. 
Another punt by Mors^ was made a mess of by Yale, 
and Robinson got it. Morse kicked, Yale made a 
fair catch and the game ended. 
The line-up: 

M K. C. YALE - 

Turner, Crossman. 1. e. r. e . Naedele. Haines 

Crosby, 1. t. r - *•• Brown 

Johnson. Walker. 1. g. r. g.. Goebel. Parks 

Alger. Robinson, c. C Biddle. Cooney 

Thompson. Hazen. r g. 1. g.. Andrus. Richardson 

Schermerhorn. Johnson, r. t 1. t . Hobbs, Lilley 

Leonard, r. e. >• e- Logan. Freeman 

Morse, q. b. q- b., Bingham, Corey. Johnson 

Neale. Blaney. 1. h. b. r. h. b., Brides, Warren 

Hosmer. r. h. b. L h. b , Philbin, Holt, Daley 

Willis. Turner, f. b. f- b.. Coy. Salover 

Score— M. A. C. 0; Yale, 49. Touchdowns— Coy 4. 
Philbin 2, Holt, Daley, Salover. Goals— Hobbs 2. Cooney 
2. Referee— Whiting of Cornell. Umpire— Dickson of 
Pennsylvania. Field judge— Gillinger of Georgetown. 
ji me — 30 and 20-minute halves. 



lost, inch by inch, through the strong plucky pulling 
of the Freshmen. 

The day was made more lively by the Juniors in 

their celebration of Junior day. Outlandish apparel 

was worn and a hurdy-gurdy was employed for the 

occasion. The class of 1910 sang her new class 

song and others, and class yells were heard all the 

afternoon. The Pull took place at 4-15 o'clock. 

Besides the Freshmen clebrating their first athletic 

victory by smoking on the Campus, both 1912 and 

1910 celebrated because of the fact that an even 

class had not won a rope pull since 1904 defeatsd 

1903 in 1901. 

The teams were as follows : 191 1— Damon (cap- 
tain), Baker, Gunn, Willard, Hill and Dudley. 1912 
— Eisenhause (captain), Gelinas, Pierpont, Brett, 
Robinson and Sanctuary. The officials were J. N. 
Summers. 1907, and H. M. Jennison. 1908. 



Colleg? N°**S- 



1912 AGAIN VICTOR. 

On Saturday, Nov. 7, the annual six-man team 
Rope-Pull took place between the Sophomores and 
Freshmen, the 1912 team pulling three feet six 
inches of rope from 191 1. The advantages at first 
lay with the Sophomores, they having the heavier 
team and also in their getting the drop at the pistol. 
For the first minute it looked like a 191 1 victory but 
the two feet of rope that was taken in by them was 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN DATE SET. 

On Monday, Sept. 28, at the instigation of Dr. 
Reynolds, five men went out for a cross country run. 
Repeated calls brought out an increasing number until 
at present there are a score of men in training. The 
announcement of Nov. 23 as a possible date for an 
interclass cross-country run sustained interest for a 
while. But the spirit was beginning to flag when only 
ten days ago a Globe Wernicke section containing 
five cups was placed on exhibition in the Union. This 
incentive revived enthusiasm. 

The cups vary in size and value. Four are silver. 
The fifth and smallest is wood with silver trimmings. 
They will be awarded contestants in the order of fin- 
ishing the run and the winners 'names will be inscribed 
upon them. The first man will be given 20 points, 
the second 19, the third 18 and so on. These points 
will be summed with the points won at the indoor 
meet, to be held later, in making decisions. 

The course run will be the return by road from 
Sunderland, a distance of 6 1-2 miles. The run is 
set for Monday, Nov. 23. A few of the more 
ambitious have been over the course already, and 
good time is reported. Among those out for the run 
are: Corbett, C. H. White. Warner, Ide, '09; 
Brooks, Cloues, Cowles, Dickinson, Holland, '10; 
Barrows. Pickard, 'II ; Heatley.Pierson, Southwick. 
Tower, Tupper, Wilde, '12. Others are running and 
will show up when the teams of five are picked. 



G. A. Bishop visited college recently. 

G. R. Fulton, '09, received a visit from his mother 
last week. 

Inside drill commenced last week. Some gym- 
nasium work is being planned for the winter. 

Plans are being made to collect a number of M. A. 
C. songs and publish them in book form with the 
music. 

L. C. Willis, '09. and R. C. Potter. '09. have 
recently taken up the study of organic chemistry and 
Spanish. 

The dynamo at the heating and lighting station is 
undergoing repairs. This necessitates the use of 
town power. 

Rehearsals for the Senior entertainment will start 
this week. All wishing to compete should report to 
the committee. 

A voluntary subscription of $1 1 .03 was collected in 
Chapel last Wednesday to pay for printing the words 
of the football songs. 

P. H. Smith of the Experiment Station addressed 
the Stockbridge Club, Oct. 27, on the subject, "Corn 
and its By-products." 

H. W. Turner, '09, is recovering from an attack 
of blood poisoning in his ankle due to an injury 
received In the Yale game. 

A recommendation has been made by the commis- 
sion that investigated the college barn fire that a night 
watchman be appointed. 

Manager Lindblad of the basketball team is consid- 
ering putting up bleachers in the north end of the Drill 
Hall for the games this winter. 

The Republican Club of the college had a wire 
[from Boston by which they received election returns 
until midnight Tuesday, Nov. 3. 

At a recent meeting of the Senior class plans to 
interest prospective students were discussed and a 
I committee appointed to investigate the matter. 

A Republican Club supper was held on the Friday 
[night before election in Draper Hall. Professor 
Churchill of Amherst college gave a splendid address. 



R. D. Lull and E. F. Damon represented the Phi 
Sigma Kappa Fraternity at the general convention 
held last week at Franklin and Marshall college, 
Lancaster, Ha. 

The college pond was skimmed over with ice one 
or two mornings last week. Last Thursday there 
was a slight flurry of snow. The upper hills across 
the river were covered. 

The 1910 Junior "Prom." Committee has been 
elected as follows : R. A. Waldron, chairman ; L. 
Brandt, H. T. Cowles, L. S. Dickinson, F. T. 
Haynes, W. E. Leonard, G. Paulsen, and E. H. 
Turner. 

President Butterfield has been gathering statistics 
of each member of the Senior class that he may be 
in a position to make intelligent recommendations. 
Information is at hand regarding practical experience, 
major and minor subjects being pursued, and 
chosen vocation. 

The catalogue of the College has usually been an 
edition of 2500 copies but the last was a 4000 edition. 
Notwithstanding, this has been entirely exhausted 
and a booklet containing a description of courses etc., 
will be Issued later and previous to the publication of 
the 1 908- '09 catalogue. 

The Glee Club has been organized as follows: 
First Tenors, F. E. Thurston, '08, W. D. Barlow, 
'09; second tenors, G. R. Fulton, '09, L. Brandt, 
'10; first basses, G. M. Brown, '09, A. C. Brett, 
'12 ; second basses, W. F. Hennessy, Jr. '12, P. H. 
Allen, 'II, J. F. Adams, '11. Rehearsals have 
commenced for a musicale to be given in the future. 

A number of the "old grads" availed themselves 
of the opportunity for a reunion by meeting at the 
Yale game in New Haven, Oct. 31. Among the 
number were Hyslop. '08, M. A. Blake, '04, A. J. 
Farley, '08, Elwood, '04, Russell, '06, and Lyman, 
'05. There was a good representation of the faculty 
at the game also : President Butterfield, Professor 
Hart, Professor Waugh, Dr. Reynolds and Mr. 
Kenney. 

On Friday afternoon, Oct. 23, President Butterfield 
attended a meeting of the state conservation commis- 
sion. Prof. F. W. Rane, state forester, Professor 
Swain of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



47 












46 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




President Butterfield are the members of the com- 
mission. Professor Rane is chairman. The com- 
mission is to make a brief report at once to the 
national conservation commission, and also will con- 
sider the question of a permanent plan for a survey of 
the natural resources of Massachusetts. 

On Wednesday, Oct. 28, at the Assembly hour, a 
debate was held between the Democratic and Repub- 
lican Clubs. The subject was: Resolved— That 
anti-injunction as adopted by the Democratic party is 
contrary to our costitutiona! government. The speak- 
ers on the affirmative were ; R. C. Potter, '09 ; P. 
A. Racicot, Ml ; A. H. Sharpe, Ml. The speakers 
on the negative were: O. B. Briggs, '09; D. J. Caf- 
frey. '09: M. T. Smulyan. '09. The judges were 
Prof. C. N. Holcombe, and F. E. Thurston, '08. 
They awarded the decision in favor of the affirmative. 
Durling, a promising new football man has been 
admitted to college. 



the country and will take four or five weeks. The 
trustees of the college have given President Butter- 
fieid leave of absence from his college duties to en- 
able him to join the commission. The complete 
itinerary has not yet been made out, but the follow- 
ing dates have been settled : 

November 9th, meeting of Commission at Washing- 
ton, and the sanr^ day a hearing was held at Col- 
lege Park, Md. On the 10th a hearing was held at 
Richmond, Va., where the Commission was divided 
and part went to Atlanta, Ga., for a hearing on the 
1 1th and part to Raleigh, N. C, and Spartansburg. 
S. C, holding hearings on the 11th and 12th. The 
Commission will meet again at Knoxville, Tenn. , on 
the 13th and go to Lexington, Ky., for the 14th. 
From Lexington the Commission comes back again 
to Washington for the 15th where they will attend 
the National Grange. The other dates have not yet 
been announced. 



Nov. 


12- 


Nov. 


14- 


Nov. 


15- 


Nov. 


17- 


Nov. 


18- 


Nov. 


19- 


Nov. 


21- 


Nov. 


22- 


Nov. 


24 


Nov. 


25 


Nov 


30 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

-Y. M. C. A. 7.00 p. m. in Chapel. 
-Football. M. A. C. vs. Springfield 

Training School at Springfield. 
-Vespers. 5-00 p.m. in Chapel. Speaker, 

Dr. Wm. E. Barton of Chicago, III. 
-Stockbridge Club Meeting. 7-00 p. m. 

Agricultural Room. 
-Assembly. 1 -30 p. m. in Chapel. 
-Y. M. C. A. 7-00 p. m. in Chapel. 
-Football. M. A. C. vs. Tufts at Medford. 
-Vespers. 5-00 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, 

Rev. C. L. White of New York, former 

president of Colby College. 
-Stockbridge Club Meeting, 7-00 p. m. 

Agricultural Room. 

— 1-00 p. m. Thanksgiving recess 

commences. 

— 1-00 p. m. College exercises begin. 



PRESIDENT BUTTERFIELD ON LONG TRIP. 

On Saturday, November 7th, President Butterfield 
left for Washington, D. C, where he will join the 
Country Life Commission on their trip through the 
South and West investigating the conditions of coun- 
try life. This trip will include practically all parts of 



UNION COMMITTEE PLANS LIVELY 
WINTER. 

WEEKLY ENTERTAINMENTS THE FEATURE. 

The Union committee is completing arrangements 
for a long list of Saturday evening entertainments the 
coming winter. The Slayton Lyceum Bureau of 
Chicago and Boston will furnish the genuine entertain- 
ers. Other sources have been drawn upon for inter- 
esting speakers. The entertainments will generally 
be given in the Union. When stage or screen are 
needed the Chapel will be used. The College is 
standing the expense of the course this year, although 
it is expected Union funds will be available another 
winter. Some of the speakers are coming free of 

charge. 

The first entertainment was given last Saturday 
evening in the Chapel by Edward Avis, bird mimic, 
violinist, whistler. On account of the Springfield 
Training School game next Saturday and the Thanks- 
giving recess the following week the next date will be 

Dec. 5. 

Dec. 5— Lecture by Prof. Wm. L. Cowles of 
Amherst College on "Sicily." 

Dec 12— Hendrickson and Rosani. magicians, 
jugglers and illusionists, under the management of 
the Slayton Lyceum Bureau. Their program is 



arranged in four parts, consisting of magic, manipu- 
lations, rag and smoke pictures, impersonations and 
shadowgraphy. 

j an> 9 — Fred E. Kendall, baritone, humorist, 
impersonator, furnished by the Slayton Lyceum 
Bureau. Quoting from the circular, "One charm of 
Mr. Kendall's entertainment is its 'off-handedness, 
it being made up as he proceeds, in accordance with 
the apparent desires of his audience." 
Jan. 16— Open. 

Jan. 23 — Frederick W. Bancroft, of Boston, will 
present one of the following ballad concerts: An 
Evening of Old English Ballads, Irish Songs and 
Song- Writers, Scottish Songs and Singers, Songs of 
Home and Country, Songs of the Shamrock (new), 
Memories of the Past (new). "Each lecture is 
made up of descriptive text embodying much pains- 
taking research, and enlivened by an eager interest 
in the curious folk-legends of the English speaking 
race. The Illustrative songs add a surprising vivid- 
ness to the lecture, and never fail in awakening the 
hearer to enthusiasm. ' ' 

Jan. 30 — William A. Burnett. 
Feb. 27— Pitt Parker, "Crayon Wizard," the 
great New England cartoonist. 
March 16 — Open. 
March 23 — Open. 

Professor Todd of Amherst College and William 
S. Spencer of Kingston, R. I. will probably be secured 
to fill the above dates. 

The entertainments are for the College and will be 
open only to those connected with the College. The 
hour of 6-30 has been set in order that all the stu- 
dents may attend without delay immediately after 
supper. The first five or ten minutes will be given 
over to college songs and yells to allow time for the 
waiters and helpers at Draper Hall to finish their 
work. 



PLANS FOR NEW BUILDING. 

The committee on buildings and grounds organized 
about two years ago, and which consists of the trustee 
committee on buildings and grounds, with the addi- 
tion of Professors Brooks and Waugh, held a meeting 
in Boston on Saturday, Oct. 24. They accepted the 
central plan for development of college grounds pre- 
pared by the well-known landscape designer, Warren 



H. Manning of Boston. Mr. Manning will continue 
to work on details of plans, and it is expected will 
complete them ready for public inspection later in the 
year. The committee was very much pleased with 
Mr. Manning's design, and feels that a question of 
utmost importance in the future development of the 
college has been solved. 

The committee accepted the plans for the proposed 
new entomological and zoological building. The 
building will be located not far from the site of the 
present insectary. The general plan is for a central 
portion containing offices, library, stock-room, coat- 
rooms, etc., and two wings, one of them containing a 
working museum of zoology with a gallery, and a large 
lecture amphitheater occupying the basement and first 
floor, and somewhat resembling that in Clark hall. 
On the second floor this wing will contain an advanced 
lecture-room and an advanced zoological laboratory. 
In the other wing the first floor will be used as a 
sophomore zoological laboratory and in addition will 
provide accommodations for the experiment station 
work. It is the intention to remove the present 
greenhouse connected with the insectary and connect 
it with these rooms. On the second floor this wing 
will contain the senior and graduate entomological 
laboratories and the insect collection. In the base- 
ment rooms to be used for a rock museum, geological 
and mineralogical laboratories, rooms for the analysis 
and testing of insecticides and for pumps and apparatus, 
have been planned. On the third floor rooms for 
photography, storage and janitor's quarters have been 
provided. The building will be somewhat in the form 
of a letter H, the distance from corner to corner 
being approximately 100 feet in each direction. 

The need for such a building has been apparent for 
a number of years, and has been increasing each 
year. Not only is the present building far too small 
to accommodate students who desire to take the 
course, but the value of the property contained in it 
is far greater than in any other wooden building on 
the campus ; much of this, indeed, if once destroyed, 
could never be replaced, and with the increasing num- 
ber of loans of material for study from all parts of the 
United States, it is most important that this should 
be housed In a fireproof structure. The building has 
been planned with a view of accommodating laboratory 
classes in Senior entomology of 80 or 90 men at 



4 8 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



49 



once, and it is not unlikely that most of this space 
will be in use within a short time after the building 
has been erected. During the past three years 
nearly 50 percent of those In each Senior class, who 
have elected this work, have been unable to obtain it, 
because of the small size of the present building, 
although it has been enlarged to a point where another 
enlargement is no longer possible, and more ample 
accommodations have become absolutely necessary if 
the college is to provide the students with the work 
they desire, and which it promises them to give. 
The trustee committee decided that not only this 
building but all future buildings for teaching purposes 
shall be fireproof. If this building is made fireproof it 
will probably cost in the neighborhood of $75,000 
to $80,000, regardless of equipment. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '83. 
10. Course of Study and Instruction. 

The plan of organization of the college was de- 
scribed in sketch number six. In commenting upon 
this plan in the third annual report of the trustees 
(January, 1866), President French said that the 
course of study recommended by Dr. Hitchcock for 
an agricultural college, in his report in 1851, did not 
differ essentially from that suggested by Governor 
Andrew in his annual address of 1863, and that the 
principal features of both were found in our own 
plan, and in those of the agricultural colleges of 
Pennsylvania and Michigan. 

President Chadbourne in the report of the following 
year (February, 1867), stated that the object aimed 
at in the instruction was, "first, to make intelligent, 
thoroughly-educated men; and secondly, to make 
practical agriculturists ; that this was demanded by 
the law of Congress donating the lands, which de- 
clared the purpose to be, "to promote the liberal and 
practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions in life." 

This fourth report planned that the instruction 
should consist of two courses: a special course of 
lectures, exclusively agricultural, to be given every 



winter, and also a regular four years' course of study 
that should give a truly liberal education,— a basis 
for the active duties of life, which any citizen of a 
free republic might be called upon to engage in. The 
college would thus offer the advantages of a profes- 
sional school in agriculture, and an educational course 
differing from that in the other colleges of the State, 
but no less extensive and thorough in its require- 
ments. 

In this report the proposed regular course was set 
forth in detail. It is not included in this sketch be- 
cause it was considerably modified for the catalogue 
of the succeeding year. Those who completed the 
whole course were to be entitled to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science ; and students who made special 
proficiency in any department, beyond what was re- 
quired in the college course, without neglecting the 
required duties, were, on examination, to be entitled 
to a special diploma in that department. The special 
course of lectures were to be especially for the bene- 
fit of those whose circumstances were such that they 
could devote but a short time In winter to study. While 
they were not to take the place of the regular college 
duties, their arrangement with the college studies 
was to be such that students who remained three 
years in college would have an opportunity to hear all 
the lectures of the special course. Persons not 
proposing to graduate might enter at any time and 
select any two studies which they were fitted to pur- 
sue, and attend any lectures of the course. Such 
students were to conform to all the college regulations 
binding upon students of the regular course. 

In the fifth annual report of the trustees (January, 
1868), President Clark stated that the general plan 
of organization adopted by the Board and approved 
by the Governor and Council, had been made the 
basis of the course laid down in this report 5 that it 
was the intention to arrange the recitations and lect- 
ures so as to allow half of every day for manual 
labor, or for study, as might be desirable ; that when- 
ever instruction was to be given to four classes, two 
of them were to recite in the forenoon and the other 
two in the afternoon ; that three recitations, or their 
equivalent in lectures or literary exercises, were as- 
signed for each day, except Saturday and Sunday. 
Saturday afternoon was to be devoted to scientific 
exercises and recitation. On Sunday all were to 



attend church, or Bible class ; but in all biblical in- 
struction the inculcation of denominational views was, 
as far as practicable, to be avoided. The faculty 
was to be enlarged as rapidly as the increase in the 
number of students demanded, and the education 
given was to be as thorough and practical as possible. 
The course of study and instruction offered the 
pioneer class (1871), while modified more or less for 
subsequent catalogues, may be taken as fairly typical 
of the course for the first fifteen years. Freshmen 
were to have algebra, human anatomy, chemical 
physics, geometry, French, chemistry and botany, 
with lectures upon hygine, chemistry, botany and 
agriculture, and exercises in orthography, elocution, 
and English composition* Sophomores were to have 
German, agriculture, commercial arithmetic and 
book-keeping, trigonometry, analytical chemistry, 
mensuration, surveying, zooiogy and drawing, with 
lectures upon comparative anatomy, diseases of do- 
mestic animals, organic chemistry, and maiket 
gardening, and exercises in English composition and 
declamation. Juniors were to have physics, French 
or German, agricultural chemistry, drawing, rhetoric, 
horticulture, astronomy, systematic botany and his- 
tory of the United States, with lectures upon physics, 
mineralogy, the cultivation of the vine and fruit and 
forest trees and on useful and injurious insects, and 
exercises in English composition and debate. Sen- 
iors were to have intellectual philosophy, history, 
physical geography, moral philosophy, political geog- 
raphy, the civil policy of Massachusetts and the 
United States, geology, engineering and political 
economy, with lectures upon stock farming, archi- 
tecture, landscape gardening, geology and English 
literature, and exercises in original declamation and 
debate. Exercises In gymnastics, military tactics, 
and the various operations of the farm and garden 
were to be required through the course. 

The catalogue the following year (January, 1869) 
stated that those who pursued a select course would 
attend recitations and lectures with the regular clas- 
ses, but persons properly qualified and desiring 
special instruction in chemistry, civil engineering, 
agriculture or horticulture, would be allowed to make 
private arrangements with the officers having charge 
of those departments. The catalogue of January, 
1870, stated that those who did not intend to pursue 



the full course might select from the studies of the 
first, second or third terms of any year in the curri- 
culum, such instruction as they cho s e, provided they 
were qualified for it. 

In June, 1882, the trustees ordered the president 
and faculty to revise the curriculum and regulations 
of the college, and in August of that year they 
adopted a new course of study, which was first printed 
in the twentith annual report (January, 1883). Per- 
haps the most important feature of this change was 
the introduction of more instruction in the structure 
of the English language, rhetoric and history. The 
select course was discontinued this time. 

This select course existed approximately fifteen 
years, with a total enrollment according to the col- 
lege catalogues of 267 men, or an annual average of 
about 18. The first and also the smallest (1869) 
numbered 4 ; the largest enrollments were 32 in 1871 
and 32 in 1875. During this period of fifteen years 
the ratio of select students to regular students was 
approximately as 1 to 5. 



Y- /A. C- A. flo-tes. 



An audience of 300 townspeople and students 
greeted Dr. Lyman Abbott of New York at the 
Y. M. C. A. vespers on Sunday, Nov. I. The 
association considered itself very fortunate in being 
able to secure such an influential man. Dr. Abbott 
interpreted the scriptures in an interesting and force- 
ful manner and succeeded in maintaining the undi- 
vided attention of his hearers. 

The Thursday evening meeting, Oct. 29, was 
addressed by Professor Evans of Northampton. Mr. 
Evans always presents his thoughts in a way that is 
pleasing to college men. He based his remarks on 
"The first and second fiddle". He spoke of how 
important it was for a young man to have ambition, 
courage, initiative and character. He should look 
beyond the present and with keen foresight plan for 
the future. Several stories by way of illustration 
made the talk all the more interesting. Mr. Evans 
closed his remarks by cautioning the men not to be 
too easily satisfied but to always strive to make the 
most of one's self and be a first fiddle. 





5° 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



5> 







D?p&rtm{rvf fJot?s. 



HORTICULTURE. 

Professor Waugh lectured before the Hampshire 
Pomona Grange at Sunderland on Nov. 6, taking as 
his topic the questions raised by the Country Life 
Commission. 

Professor Sears lectured on Fruit Growing in 
Massachusetts before the Middlesex-Norfolk Pomona 
Grange at Ashland on Nov. 5. 

Professor White attended the Chrysanthemum 
Show of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society in 
Boston on the 7th and 8th and made a number of 
photographs for college use. 

A horticultural seminar has been organized to meet 
weekly. This is considerably different from the 
seminars of past years, being designed 3specially for 
graduate students. It is expected that this will be a 
seminar in the proper sense of the word. 

The Senior class in Landscape Gardening has been 
interesting itself in a number of practical develop- 
ment schemes outside the college, including the 
Northampton civic center, Wildwood cemetery, etc. 
It is planned to make a study also, of the plans for 
the Smith Agricultural School at Northampton. 



Alumni. 



'82. — On Nov. 12, the Phelps Publishing Co. of 
which Herbert Myrick is President will dedicate its 
new building. This building, which is a magnificent, 
eight-storied structure of reinforced concrete and has 
a floor-space of about 7 1-2 acres, will house the 
Phelps Publishing Co., the Eastern Office of the 
Orange Judd Co., the Educational Press Co., the 
G. & C. Merriam Co., and others. President 
Roosevelt has prepared a pronunciamento for the 
function, and there will be addresses by several dis- 
tinguished guests. Arrangements have been made 
with nearly all the railroads in the country for reduced 
rates. Herbert Myrick, publisher, editor, author, 
was born at Arlington, Aug. 20, 1860. He gradu- 
ated from M. A. C. in 1882 and became the agricul- 
tural editor of the New England Homestead. In 1884 
he became agricultural editor of Farm and Home of 
which he became President and editor in 1890 and 
controlling owner in 1899. He was vice-president 



of the Orange Judd Co., and managing editor of the 
American Agriculturist at New York in 1888, and 
managing editor of the Orange Judd Farmer at Chi- 
cago in 1894. He has inaugurated numerous organ- 
izations for the promotion of agricultural interests. 
He organized, and is director of, the Metallic Draw- 
ing Roll Co. He also established the Canadian Pub- 
lishing House in Toronto in 1902. He is a member 
of the N. E. A. National Irrigation Association and 
other scientific societies. He is the author of sev- 
eral books, among which are the following : "How 
to Co-operate," "Turkeys, How to Grow Them," 
"Mortgage Lifters," "Tobacco Leaf," "The Amer- 
ican Sugar Industry," "The Hop," "The Book of 
Corn," "The Crisis in Agriculture," "A Swim for 
Life," "The Tenderfoot." 

'82.— Change of address, E. S. Chandler, North 
Judson, Ind. R. F. D. No. 3. 

'94. — Superintendent Kirkland reports that the 
moth season has been exceptionally hard, because 
the warm, dry weather favored the multiplication of 
insects. However the weather has been favorable 
for effective spraying, and the results have been 
gratifying. 

'94. — Prof. S. Francis Howard was in Wilbraham 
Oct. 29, attending the celebration of the fortieth 
anniversary of the settlement there as pastor of his 
father, Rev. Martin S. Howard. 

'95. — Walter L. Morse, Grand Central Station, 
335 Madison Ave., New York City. 

'97. — George D. Leavens of the Coe-Mortimer 
Co, has recently written an interesting pamphlet on 
fertilizers. Mr. Leavens holds a prominent position 
in the company. His address is 530 First St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'99. — William H. Armstrong was detailed in July 
by the Secretary of War to attend the School for 
Officers at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. These details 
are made by recommendation, one detail from each 
regiment of the army. He is 1st Lieutenant in the 
U. S. Infantry and an Engineer officer in charge of 
military survey and mapping. 

'99.— Mr. and Mrs. Bernard H. Smith of Boston 
were in town last week on account ot the death of 
Mrs. Smith's father, Amos Brown. 

'00. — J. E. Halligan is the author of a voluminous 



bulletin on Commercial Fertilizers and Paris Green, 
just published by the Louisiana Experiment Staiion. 

02.— A. L. Dacy has accepted a position as hor- 
ticulturist at the West Virginia Experiment Station, 

Morgantown, W. Va. 

*04.— Change of address, H.D.Newton, Interlaken, 

Mass. 

'05.— Change of address of J. R. Kelton from 

Lansing, Mich, to Orange, Mass. 

'05.— A. D. Taylor, formerly instructor in land- 
scape gardening at Cornell University is now in the 
employ of Warren H. Manning, landscape gardener, 
of Boston. While at Cornell Mr. Taylor designed 
and drew a planting plan for the grounds of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. A blue print of this design may 
be seen in the reading room at Wilder Hall. Mr. 
Taylor's new position offers great possibilities. 

'07.— Walter Dickinson is spending a few days at 

his home. 

'07.— Miss Susie D. Livers, ^Ginn & Co., 29 

Beacon St., Boston. 

'08.— H. C. Chase and T. H. Jones have gone 
into business together in Swampscott. Through the 
winter their work will be chiefly the extermination of 



the gypsy and brown-tail moth. In the spring they 
will be engaged in tree work in the vicinity of Lynn. 
'08. Principal R. H. Verbeck of Petersham 
high school is coaching its football and basketball 
teams. 

'08. D. P. Miller has gone to Chicago in the 

employ of J. C. Vaughan. Mr. Vaughan is the 
largest dealer in seeds, plants and flowers, west of 
New York. 

'08.— The following is taken from a recent copy 
of the Albany Times- Union:—' 'Some expert tree 
pruning and surgery is being done on Washington 
avenue by John T. Withers, landscape architect and 
forester, Jersey City, N. J., under the direction of 
George Paige, forestry superintendent. Mr. Withers 
is also treating the trees on the W. S. S. Petz estate 
in Selkirk. This work is in charge of P.M.Eastman. 

'08. J. A. Anderson Is with F. C. Peters & Co., 

Practical Scientific Foresters, Box 546, Ardmore.Pa. 

•08.— K. F. Anderson, 81 West St., Utica, N.Y. 

Ex- '08.— The marriage engagement is announced 

of Miss Bertha May Ball of Saxtons River, Vt., to 

Allan Farrar of Derby, Conn., formerly of Amherst. 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.0O 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DEUEVS DRUG «TOKI£ 



I 

■ 

I 



52 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAILOH STOK^ 
II AMITY STREET, . AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Tei.ki'hone 54-4. 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 



CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED 
FROM LONDON. 



DIRECT 



CAMPION, 

AIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 

AMHERST, MASS 



Intkk-Cou.kgiatk Bureau of Academic Costume 

College Caps and 6ou>ns. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



Rahar's jnn, 

01<l South Street, oft Main, NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Modern Improvement*, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in '* lUmp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



It's Your Next at the 




Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. 



Tuesdays 7 

Wednesdays, 7 

Thursdays, 7 

Fridays, 7 

Saturdays, 7 



6 
8 
6 
8 
11 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertiliser Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



'For the 



THE C0E-P10RTIPB HM.. 



24-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT & DZTSON 

Minufacturcrs ind Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It la generally conceded 
that the club's equipped 
by W RIGHT tc OITSON 
have the best looking, 
beat fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The W RIGHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweater*. 

CATALOGUE FKEE 

WRIGHT «Ss DITSON 

ri 4 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON 

18 WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




Land's Sake 



USE 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 




They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



E BALL 
SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

K. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Bank, AMHERST 




Gaps and Gotons 

Makers to 06/07/08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and J loads. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth Av , Nkw Yokk. 



I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



» 



I' 



Connecticut Valley street Hallway Co. 

AMHEB8T DIVISION. 

Cam will leave Amherst and Northampton OS the hour and 
half hour from 8.30 a.m. till 10.30 p.m. Sundays the tirst car 
will leave at *.30 a.m. 

Main offick, Gmkenhki-d, Mass. 

John A.TaKKOrt, Supt. 

NORTHAMPTON OFFICE, 102 MAIN ST. 

C. W. Clapp. A»8t. 8upt. Teleph one, Northampton, 128-13 . 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To sav. your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Ke pairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

OppostTB Town Hall. 



Amherst k SiriM Street Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and IS 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., ami Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour ami half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amlieret. 



WANTED 

college: men and women 

to act as our Sales Agents. Earn enongh during the sunv 
m. i to pay your expenses for the next year. Our propo- 
sition offers 40% prfit. No capital required. YV rite lor 
full particulars. Catalogue and samples free. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS COMPANY 
1209 W. Taylor St., Chic ago, 111 

DENTALi ROOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK AMHEB8T, MAS* 



£. B. DICKINSON, JJ. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - - - • AMHKKST. MASS. 

OFFICK HOURS: 

9 to 12 a.- M-, 1-30 to o p. m:. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORBECTED TO OCT. 4, 1908. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m., 
express, and 5.3* p. m. The 5.38 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 

6.20 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 




WEBSTER'S 



INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONARY 

A LIltKAKY IN ONE BOOK. 
Besides an accurate, practical, and scholarly 
vocabulary of English, with 25.000 NEW 
WORbS, the International contains a History or 
the English Language, Guide to Pronunciation, 
Dictionary of Fiction, New Gazetteer, New Bio- 
graphical Dictionary.Vocabulary of Scripture. 
Greek and Latin Names, English Christian 
Names. Foreign Quotations, Abbreviations, Etc. 

S380 PAGES. r.ooo ILLUSTRATIONS. 

SHOULD VOL' NOT O WN SI XII A BOOK? 

WF.ltSTEK'S COLLEOlATE nTrriONAHY. 

Lann-xt of our '-• Ki-ffnUr and Thin Paper 

fcUltiona. 1116 l'il I » AVU 110 1U.VSTR4TIONB. 

Write for "The Story of a Book" Free. 
G. & C. MEKRTAM CO., Springfield, Mass. 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic Block, near Depot, open .very .lay. 

Lunches. Confectionery, Cigar* Note.l for it* eicellent 

Oyster Stew ami Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 A. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNION, 

MANUFAl TUHKK OF 

WATEK! 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ulng-er 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 

SOUTHAMPTON, MASS 



_ 



KIVKK STKtKT, 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAjM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR. 

Baa iwetWad tin- latest fabrioi for tin- ifrtag ami wwmbw 

trade of 07 in Gentlemen's (iurmciits. Also &MI Ladies' 
(lai inents in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Preying promptly done. 

fey-Military Work a Specialty .„m 
Under tin; Post Office, - - Amherst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUpto-DaU. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE l'RICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Projirietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



BANANA SPLITS. 



1VI.A..O. At***, 



O. H.WIJUM, ♦«>«> 



Get Sample Rates for Washing- 
Work Uken Monday delivered Thursday. 

•• Thursday delivered Saturday. 

^erSATIBFAOTION OUARANTEBD.«'r/- 
H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 

office: 

East Flesusan-t Street. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. 8Z, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE STORE. 



The Children are Happy. 



Because their clothes ire iim.l. ontheNrw Honttwno 
». ■iiini- which fact, secure* Hum of no •'ripe. Moiiicre 
iouM a-** one Rt onc « BM u wU1 do f '" lh * " c,,ll,,^, ' ,, 1n ye8r * 



ra 



to come. Dealers Everywhere 






I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some Howers. Better than candy for results. 




OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 



Akthur E. Dorr. L. H. Tourtklottk. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WIIOI.K8ALK KKAI.KHS AND JOHHKK8 IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union St*., Basement 3 Union St., 
BOSTON. 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

»st Manufacturers 
Official Athletic J 

Foot Ball 



The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 



Official 
Implements 
for all 
Track and 
Field Sports 



Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 



Uniforms 
for all 
Athletic 
Sports 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue of 

all sports contains numerous suggestions 

Mailed free anywhere 

A. CI. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York Chicago Denver SanFrancisco 

Boston Philadelphia Kansas Citj Minneapolis 

Buffalo Pittsburg Cincinnati New Orleans 

Syracuse Baltimore Detroit Cleveland 

Washington St. Lmus Montreal. Can. Lond on , Eng. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES BARM, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AMHERST, MASS 



J. H.TROTT 



PLDPIBER, STEM! & BBS FITTER. 

HUD DEALER III STOVES AND RIMES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



ESTABLISHED 1H61. 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18tb Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMroHTBBB AND MAMUKACTDRKKS OK 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GrOODS- 



We handle the bent of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL" 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for 11.50. 

J. A. TURNER. 

PLEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 

A PULL LINE OF 

Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery- 
Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKB. MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER 6 CO. 



Hwttm 



AttHttSf a AASS. 









i\ 




►J><TH 



flfoassacbusette 
Hgricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2 ^ POUR. YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3 POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 






il 



(Jt >ii»- 



THE COLLEGE SffilAL 



VOL.. 19 



NO. 5 



MASSACHUSETTS 






AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 






AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 25. 1908 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 




I 



II 




Page's SDoe Store 

Next to Post Office. 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 

E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, MAMDOblN. GUITAR STRINGS. 



THE MANAGER OF THIS PAPER USES A 

Smith Premier 
Typewriter 

AND IS PLEASED TO SAY THAT IT GIVES 

Perfect Satisfaction. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS PILLED. 

THURBERS 

VARIETY STORE. 
M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 25. 1908 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student* and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication* should be addressed. Cou.bg> Siohal. Amherst , Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribe.* who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Bu*ines» Manager. _____ __ — — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BRICCS, 1909. Bu*ine*s Manager. 

W.R.CLARKE, 1910, Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON. 1910. Assistant Business Manager. 
R. C. POTTER. 1909. College Notes. L. C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

M. F. CEER. 1909, Alumni Notes. H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Department Notes. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notes. A. H. SHARPE, 1911. 

E. M. BROWN, 1911. 



Term*. $1.00 per near in iHciiim. Single Copies, 10c. Pontage ontaide of United States and Canada. Mc. extra 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket- Ball Association, 
Base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

H. W. Turner, Pre*. College Senate. 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 



Fraternity Conference, 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad. Pre*. 
F. T. Haynes. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



1910 INDEX KEADY DECEMBEE 10. 



Editorials. 



The Signal herewith wishes to voice the student 
body's hearty appreciation of the work done by L. S. 
Corbett, '09, and Louis Brandt, '10, as cheer lead- 
ers. Corbett's enthusiasm is contagious. 



The band and its leader. R. S. Whitney, ' 1 1 , are 
due great credit for the progress they are making. 
Made up almost entirely of freshmen, it is surpassing 
expectations. And they have the right sort of spirit, 
too. But it seems that with the organization of our 
band there lies the same trouble that characterizes 
our athletic teams — they exist by ups and downs. 
Veterans graduate and there are no men to fill their 
places. Once in four years we get out a winning 



team— a winning band. And then it slumps, just 
because the essentials of team-work are graduated 
with the veteran players and we have to begin all over 
again. The remedy is not far to seek but when it 
comes to the application — there is the rub. 

The game with Springfield Training School, Sat- 
urday, Nov. 15, was one of the cleanest and hardest 
fought games of the season. Massachusetts men 
had been watching the play of Springfield Training 
School all the fall and realized that when the teams 
met in their annual game it would oe «i battle royal. 
In anticipation of the need of a loyal and liberal sup- 
port, Sings were held in the Union, Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings and at Assembly Wednesday, and 
on the evening before the game, a rousing mass 
meeting raised Massachusetts' spirit to the highest. 















54 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



55 



li 



Team, undergraduates, representatives of faculty 
and of alumni, went to Springfield on that Saturday 
with the spirit of that good old song of ours ringing in 
the ears: 

Hail, hail Massachusetts. 

Loyal and true ; 

Thy sons are gathered to cheer for you, 

And whether victors or vanquished we, 

Still we'll be cheering for M. A. C. 

This Is not the spirit of "win at any cost," emphat- 
ically not ! The college expected the team would 
put up the stlffest, grittiest fight of which it was cap- 
able, and every man from center to full-back knew 
the importance of this expectation. Springfield, In 
the light of last year's close game, jubilant over the 
anticipation of crossing Massachusetts goal line, was 
ready with yell and song and even cannon to back a 
team that had beaten Wesleyan 1 1 to 0, and had "held 
the best team that West Point was capable of turn- 
ing out to a 6 to 5 score" the week before. Spring- 
field has been a "friendly foe" and a true sportsman 
in past years and on account of this the annual strug- 
gle has been second only to the Amherst game in 
interest and enthusiasm. 

Saturday, Nov. 14, the expectations of witnessing 
a clean, interesting game were satisfied and both 
Springfield and Massachusetts came away with a 
measure of victory in their hearts. Massachusetts 
had held a truly fast team to a tie score. Springfield 
had crossed their opponent's goal line. And besides, 
sportsmanlike spirit of players and rooters had marked 
the struggle. 



strong game, as did Kennedy, D. E. Sanborn, and 
Loud for New Hampshire. 

New Hampshire received the kickoff, and soon 
punted, but recovered the ball on a fumble. They 
got within kicking distance of the goal, but an attempt 
failed. Schermerhorn kicked from the 26 yard line, 
then New Hampshire lost 1 5 on a penalty. Morse 
made a forward pass to Leonard, who fumbled, the 
ball rolling over New Hampshire's goal line where 
Crossman fell on it. Hosmer kicked the goal. 
Score, 6-0. 

After several punts had been exchanged, and 
numerous penalties inflicted, New Hampshire finally 
pushed the ball over, D. E. Sanborn making the 
touchdown. Kennedy failed at goal. Score, 6-5. 

The rest of the half was desperately fought. New 
Hampshire gradually worked the ball down toward 
our line, and Kennedy dropped one over, leaving the 
score in New Hampshire's favor. 

It took 15 minutes of the second half for Hosmer 
to make our second touchdown. Morse failed at 
kicking the goal. Score, 11-9 In our favor. 

Our last two points came on a safety when Ken- 
nedy was pushed back over his own line. That left 
the score 13-9, as it remained. 

The summary. 



/Athletic N°**S- 



FOOTBALL. 

M. A. C, 13; N. H. S. C, 9. 

New Hampshire was defeated by our team Nov. 7, 
at Manchester, before 1500 spectators, it was a 
hard-fought contest, New Hampshire being ahead at 
one time. Our line was somewhat heavier, and wore 
down the Durham line in the second half. 

Fumbling was frequent on both sides, and many 
penalties were inflicted. New Hampshire was weak 
on tackling, while our ends showed up well in this 
department. Hosmer, Willis and Blaney played a 



M. A. C 

Crossman. 1. e. 
Crosby. 1. t. 
Durling. 1. g. 
Alger, c. 
Johnson, r. g. 
Schermerhorn. r. t. 
W. Leonard, r. e. 
Morse, q. b. 
Hosmer, 1 h. b. 
Blaney, r. h. b. 
Willis, f. b. 



N. H. S. C. 

r. e.. Read 

r. t., Pettingill, Richardson 

r. g., Morgan 

c . Proud 

1. g., H. Sanborn 

1. t., Hammond 

1. e., E. Leonard 

q. b., Kennedy 

r. h. b., Peasley, Chase 

1. h. b., Loud 

f. b., D. Sanborn 



Score — 13-9. Touchdowns — Crossman. Hosmer. D. San- 
born. Safety— Kennedy. Goal from touchdown— Hosmer. 
Goal from field— Kennedy. Referee— Keady of Dartmouth. 
Umpire — Riley of Brown. Field judge— Brice of Manches- 
ter. Linesmen— Hingham, Wilson, and Cone. Time— 30- 
minute halves. 

M. A. C, 5; S. T. S., 5. 
Springfield Training School held our team to a tie 
score in the game Saturday, Nov. 14, at the Spring- 
field grounds. It was the first time in sixteen years 
that they have succeeded in crossing our goal line, 



and they regard the result as a victory. The game 
was hard, clean, and well contested by both sides. 
Captain Turner was missed, as was Sexton. Both 
of these men are out on account of injuries. Leon- 
ard had a bad ankle, and Blaney and Hosmer were 
injured, but stayed in. The work of both lines was 
good, forcing frequent punts. Schermerhorn was a 
star In this department, and was only a little better 
than Winter. Fumbling was more frequent on the 
side of the home team, but in nearly every instance 
a Massachusetts man recovered it. Crosby's per- 
formance is an example of this. Springfield's work 
was more individual than ours, our team work being 
excellent. It is hard to pick out those on our side 
who distinguished themselves. Hosmer, Crosby, 
Alger, were, perhaps, more prominent than the others. 

IN DETAIL. 

Springfield opened the game by kicking off to Hos- 
mer on our 3 yard line. He returned the ball 30 
yards. We could not make our distance and 
Schermerhorn punted 30 yards. Springfield returned 
it 12 yards. A long run around right end netted only 
3 yards. The next play went around the other end 
for 26 yards, Morse tackling. Eight yards through 
left guard brought it to our 18 yard line. Springfield 
was held for downs, a trick play around left end being 
broken up by Blaney. Willis made one through 
guard, Schermerhorn punted 40, but the ball rolled 
beyond the quarterback, was recovered by Crosby, 
and carried over for a touchdown. Morse failed to 
kick the goal. Score, 5-0. There was some ques- 
tion about offside play by Massachusetts, but the 
claim was not allowed. 

Springfield kicked again to Hosmer, who ran it 
back 25 yards. Willis tore off 6, and Hosmer 2. 
Schermerhorn's punt went 45 yards, and was not 
returned at all. Winters went through our line, 
broke loose, and scored from the Springfield 35 yard 
line. Goal missed. Score, 5-5. 

Crosby kicked off 45 yards, Springfield returned 
the ball 12. A long run around left end resulted in 
half a yard gain. A 9 yard loss forced Springfield to 
punt to Morse. Willis made 2, Blaney 4, Schermer- 
horn's punt went 50, was returned 12. A play 
through tackle lost 2, an attempted forward pass 
made 17, but it hit the ground and a 15 yard penalty 



brought the ball to Springfield's 3 yard line. They 
punted 40, Blaney returned It 10, Willis made 2 and 
Blaney 3. A forward pass on the place kick forma- 
tion was fumbled. Training School recovering. They 
soon were forced to kick, and Blaney made a good 
return but went outside. Two short gains and a punt, 
which was fumbled, and recovered by Johnson. 
After making 5 in two tries, a place kick was tried, 
but the ball hit the line, Crosby being downed with It 
on the T. S. 13 yard line. Willis made 9 through 
left tackle, but Springfield held for downs. They 
made 9 and 5, when Hosmer Intercepted a forward 
pass on their 24 yard mark. Blaney lost 3, Morse 
made 6, then tried an onslde kick, but it amounted 
to a punt and rolled over the line. Springfield kicked 
from the 25 yard mark, Blaney returned It 1 5 to 
Training School's 45 yard line. We soon punted, 
then forced Training School to do the same. Strong 
defense by Springfield forced another kick on our 
part. They made first down on a forward pass, but 
lost 7 yards on the next try. Another loss at right 
end, and Training School kicked to Blaney, who 
returned It 4 yards. Schermerhorn punted to Train- 
ing School on their 20 yard mark. They returned It 
10, then lost 4, made 4, and the half ended, with the 
score tied 5-5. 

Crosby kicked to Springfield, who returned the ball 

20 yards to the 24 mark. A feeble punt was recov- 
ered by T. S. for a gain of 15 yards. They had to 
kick. Blaney returned it a short distance, fumbled, 
and Alger recovered it. We then suffered a penalty 
for holding. Schermerhorn punted, T. S. fumbled, 
Johnson recovered and advanced 25 yards but was 
brought back and another penalty for interfering with 
a fair catch inflicted. A minute later offside play by 
T. S. gave us 5. A forward pass struck the ground, 
and another 15 was given us, and we got the ball on 
downs. Hosmer made 6. Willis 2, Schermerhorn 
punted, Springfield returned it 15, then made 5, 2. 
and 6. Hosmer made a great tackle, losing 6 for 
T. S. Morse received the punt on our 16 yard line. 
Willis made 3, Hosmer 16 around end, Blaney lost 
1 , Hosmer made 3, Schermerhorn punted 50 yards. 
Springfield made 6 on a trick play for which there 
was no audible signal. Then they made 4, 3, 5, and 
6. Blaney intercepted a forward pass. A fumble 




I 



56 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



S /0 IS 20 <?j> 



JS 40 4S SO JS SO 4S 



40 JS 30 2S 2C IS IC S 







First Half 




O- MASSACHUSETTS* BALL C,- rrs „ /n Hal r 

m -SPRINGFIELD l S BALL ^EO O/VD H/IL F 



FP-FORWARD PASS 



xxx FUMBLE — RUN 

^^PENALTY MCK 

-i—RUN BACH OF MCK 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



57 



caused a small loss. Schermerhorn kicked, and a 
minute later T. S. followed suit. A short gain, and 
we kicked again. Springfield was too close to their 
own goal to be comfortable, and kicked at once, 
Morse returning It 15 yards. Then by a series of 
good gains we got down to the 25 line, and tried a 
drop. It fell short, and T. S. brought it back 25 
yards. They punted after two short rushes, and 
interfered with our fair catch, for which we got 
15 yards. A few more gains, a fumble and T. S. 
had the ball on their 25 yard line. They made 20 
in a trick end run, then 7 and 2, when the half 
ended. The line-up : 



M. A. c. 

Crossman, 1. e, 
Schermerhorn. 1. t. 
Durling. I. g. 
Alger, c. 
Johnson, r. g. 
Crosby, r. t. 
Leonard, r. e. 
Morse, q. b. 
Hosmer. 1. h. b. 
Blaney. r.'h b. 
Willis, f. b. 

Score— M. A. C, 5; 
Winters. Referee — Foster, 
ampton. Linesmen — Damon and Kingsbury. 
—Tower. Time— 35 minute halves. 



s. t. s. 

r. e.. Winters 

r. t.. Yeager 

r. g.. Martin 

c, Wright 

1. g., Delehanty 

1. t., Howard (capt) 

1. e.. Hulek 

q. b,. McCulloch 

r. h. b.. Schroder. Colton 

1. h. b.. Hopkins 

f. b., Molier 

Touchdowns — Crosby, 

Umpire— Dr. Collins of North- 



Field judge 



REPORT OF TRACK ASSOCIATION. 

Report of the Treasurer of the M. A. C. Interclass 
Track Association: 

RECEIPTS. 

Contributions, class 1908, $20 50 

Contributions, class 1909, 24 25 

Contributions, class 1910, 15 50 

Contributions, class 1911, 24 75 $85 00 

Gate receipts, Indoor Meet, 17 25 

Sale of programs, Indoor Meet, 6 15 23 40 

Gate receipts, Outdoor Meet, 21 25 

Sale of programs, Outdoor Meet, 9 10 30 35 

From band collection, 6 44 

$145 19 



EXPENDITURES. 




Gymnasium mattress, 


$21 00 


Two stop watches, 


12 50 



Rope, 

Hammer, extra handles, 

Discus, 

Printing, 

Incidental expenses, Indoor Meet, 

Incidental expenses. Outdoor Meet, 

Interclass cup and engraving, 

£145 19 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lamert S. Corbett, Treasurer, 
Audited, Henry W. Turner, Chairman. 



96 






5 50 






4 00 


43 


96 


20 00 


20 


00 


2 44 






16 79 


19 


23 


62 00 


62 


00 



REPORTS ON VOLUNTARY COLLECTIONS. 



Collected, 
Sale of copies, 

Expenditure printing, etc., 



$11 03 
95 

$11 98 
$11 08 



Balance handed to R. C. Potter. $ 90 
(Signed) L. S. Corbett. 

Collected, $31 76 

Paid for band, $23 00 

Songs and telephone, 1 75 



Total expenditures, 

Balance, 
Paid to L. S. Corbett for cup, 



24 75 

$7 01 
6 44 



Balance, 



57 



(Signed) 



R. C. Potter. 



MASS MEETING. 

The assembly last Wednesday was in charge of 
Dr. Reynolds and the president of the Senate, O. C. 
Bartlett, '09. Dr. Reynolds reported that B. A. A. 
would be willing to admit our track team to their next 
annual indoor meet to race with a team from Wor- 
cester Polytechnic Institute, provided W. P. I. were 
willing. He had written to Worcester about it, and 
they had signified their willingness to compete with 
us. The chances, then, are good for a dual relay 
race with W. P. I. this winter in Boston. 

The meeting then elected H. W.Turner, '09, capt- 
ain of the 'varsity relay team, and L. S, Corbett, '09, 
manager. 

Dr. Reynolds further said that he could make a 



THE M. A. C— S. T. S. GAME 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



contract to keep the pond in good condition for skat- 
ing during the whole winter for $75. He advocated 
forming a hockey club for the purpose of raising this 
sum. About 175 undergraduates expressed their 
willingness to join it. It was moved to have a hockey 
game on the list of regular contests between the two 
lower classes. This comes, however, under the 
jurisdiction of the Senate, and nothing was done 
about it, although the sentiment of the students was 

in favor of It. 

The post-graduate students asked to be allowed to 
form a team to play the teams of the various classes. 
Their request was granted. 

Dr Reynolds announced that from Jan. 3 to 
Easter there will be no military drill, but he will give 
gymnasium work Instead. Cadets who are not In train- 
ing for some team must take his course In gymnastics. 

L.S.Corbett, '09, reported that there was a deficit of 
$6 44 on the cup which was awarded last spring to 
the class winning the two meets. He also reported 
that there was some money left over from that which 
was contributed for the band, and he asked to be 
allowed to use this money to make good the deficit 
on the cup. The meeting granted his request. 



Collet N°**S- 






E. A. Clancy, '12, has left college. 
The senior course in Bacteriology ends probably 
December 3. 

Professor F. A. Waugh. left last Saturday on an 
extended trip to Montreal. 

A strip of rubber matting reaching from entry to 
entry has been laid in the Union. 

The battalion appeared In complete uniform for the 
first time this semester on Nov. 10. 

The first rehearsal for the Senior Minstrel show 
was held last Wednesday evening. 

A large squad of Freshmen were engaged last week 
In cleaning the football field from snow. 

The ladles of the college are planning a reception 

to the students of the college on the evening of Dec. 4. 

At a meeting of the class, H. G. Noble, 09, was 

chosen captain and manager of the class track team. 



A new line of steam pipes is being laid to the barn. 
K. E. Gillett, C. S. Gillett, T. L. Warner, S. 
L. Davenport, P. W. Farrar. J. R. Parker, '08 
were visitors at College after the Springfield game. 

President Butter field has been appointed by Gov- 
ernor Guild as a member of the national commission 
on the conservation of the natural resources of the 
country. 

Gifford Pinchot, chief of the United States For- 
estry Bureau and also a member of the Commission 
on Country Life, will be the speaker at the 1909 
commencement. 

On account of pressure of other work, S. R. 
Parsons, Ml. has resigned from his position on the 
Signal Board. At a meeting held Wednesday, 
Nov. 18, E. M. Brown, Ml, was elected to fill the 
vacancy. 

A very enthusiastic mass-meeting was held Friday. 
Nov. 13. Professor Howard. Professor Haskell, 
Messrs. Chapman, Summers and Sexton. Coaches, 
Bullock and Munson, and Captain Turner were 
speakers. 

On Wednesday, Nov. 18. at Assembly the ad- 
dress was given by Dr. Tucker, of Boston. Sub- 
j ec t_"The New American." Dr. Tucker is Presi- 
dent of the International Immigration Committee of 
theY. M. C. A. 

The Index Board for 1911 has been elected as fol- 
lows: A. H. Sharpe, editor-in-chief; H. L. Blaney, 
business manager; S. R. Parsons, assistant editor- 
In-chief; H. J. Baker, assistant business manager; 
p. A. Racicot, artist ; 1. W. Davis, A. P. Burseley, 
p. F. Pickard, E. M. Brown, associate editors 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



59 



The largest mass-meeting of the year was held in 
the Chapel, Thursday evening, Nov. 19, in prepara- 
tion for the Tufts game. Songs were sung, yeljs 
were given and spirit ran high. Louis Brandt. MO, 
junior cheer leader, had charge of the meeting. 
Coach "Matt" Bullock spoke on the prospects of the 
game with Tufts and thanked the students for their 
loyal support. He ended by speaking of his appre- 
ciation of the college and his good feeling toward it. 
He was followed by Professor Waugh, Professor 
Gribben, F. E. Thurston, '08, Captain Turner, mana- 
ger Thompson and several members of the team. 



An appropriation has been granted by President 
Butterfield sufficient to install 100 lockers In the 
Drill Hall. These will be reserved for students living 
other than in the dormitories. The annual budget 
to the legislature this winter will include a request 
for an appropriation to increase this number to 300, 
that every undergraduate may have a locker to use 
during the season of gymnasium work. 

President Butterfield in his trip with the Commis- 
sion on Country Life left Washington on November 
17th for the Southern and Western trip. The itiner- 
ary is as follows : 

Nov. 18. Birmingham, Ala. ; 19, Shreveport, La., 
Marshall, Miss. ; 20, Dallas. Tex. ; 23, El Paso, 
24. Tuscon. Ariz.; 26, Los Angeles, Cal.; 27, 
Fresno, Cal.; 28 and 29, San Francisco, Cal.; 30, 
Sacramento, Cal.; Dec, 1. Reno, Nev. ; 3, and 4, 
Salt Lake City, Utah.; 5 and 6. Denver, Col.; 
7. Ft. Collins, Col. ; 9, Omaha, Neb. 

The college is sending out an attractive circular 
describing the short courses which begin Jan. 5 and 
continue for 10 weeks. The courses are open to all 
those who are over 1 8 years of age and are intended 
to give specific training along the lines of general 
agriculture, horticulture, dairying and floriculture. 
The work is offered for those who cannot spend a 
longer time at the college, but who wish to become 
familiar with the results of scientific investigation 
along agricultural lines and the practical application 
of these investigations to every-day farm affairs. 

A debate was held at the weekly meeting of the 
Stockbridge Club, Tuesday, Nov. 17. The subject 
was: Resolved: — That New England should raise 
its own supply of corn, rather than import it from the 
West. The affirmative was taken by R. P. Arm- 
strong, MO, and J. B. Thomson, "09. The speakers 
on the negative were: H. W. French, MO, and C. S. 
Putnam, *09. The judges were: W. L. Ide, '09; 
P. P. Cardin, '09; A. W. Holland, MO. The nega- 
tive speakers were awarded the decision for two 
reasons. They brought out the facts: 1st, the 
New England farmer cannot with the less favorable 
soil and climatic conditions, compete with the west- 
ern farmer and his more favorable conditions : 2nd, 
the New England farmer can get a larger return per 
acre from other crops than from corn. 



Dec. 1.- 

Dec. 2.- 
Dec- S.- 
Dec. S.- 
Dec. 6.- 
Dec. 8.- 
Dec. 9.- 

Dec. 10 
Dec. 12 

Dec. 13 
Dec. 14 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

-Stockbridge Club. 7-00 p. m. Agricultural 
Room. 

-Assembly. 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. 

-Y. M. C. A. 7-00 p. m. In Chapel. 

-Social Union Lecture. Prof. W. L. Cowles 
of Amherst. Subject, "Sicily." 

-Vespers. 5-00 p. m. In Chapel. Speaker, 
Rev. F. J. Goodwin of Pawtucket, R. I. 

-Stockbridge Club. 7-00 p. m. in Agricul- 
tural Room. 

-Assembly. 1-30 p. m. In Chapel. Speaker, 
Hon. W. H. Feiker of Northampton. 

— Y. M C. A. 7-00 p. m. in Chapel, 

— Social Union. Hendrlckson and Rosanl, 
magicians and illusionists. 

— Vespers. 5-00 p. m. In Chapel. Speaker, 
Dr. W. D. McKenzle, President Hart- 
ford Theological Seminary. 

—Stockbridge Club. 7-00 p. m. In Agri- 
cultural Room. 



FRATERNITY CONFERENCE RULES. 

RUSHING SEASON COMES EARLY. 

Resolved— That no candidate for Fraternity mem- 
bership shall be spoken to about, nor shown literature 
pertaining to, nor approached In any manner what- 
ever in regard to fraternities or fraternity membership 
until after the chapel exercises on the second Tues- 
day morning after the Thanksgiving recess. Be It 

Resolved, further: — That no candidate for fraternity 
membership shall be spoken to about or shown liter- 
ature pertaining to, nor approached in any manner 
whatever In regard to fraternities or fraternity mem- 
bership after 6-00 o'clock p. m., Thursday of the 
same week, and no fraternity man shall be with him 
from that time until after chapel of the following 
morning. 

Resolved, further -.—That the wearing of a fraternity 
pin, or pledge emblem by a candidate shall signify 
that the bearer is pledged to that fraternity and that 
the pin or pledge emblem shall be voluntarily put on 
by the candidate himself during the chapel exercises 
of the following morning. (Any verbal or written 
promise shall not be valid.) 






6o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



61 



Resolved, further :— That no candidate shall be 
taken out of town during the above mentioned 
"working" season, and no fraternity men shall asso- 
ciate with such candidate while out of town during 
the aforesaid season. 

Resolved, further:— Wo spread, banquet, entertain- 
ment, etc., shall be given to a candidate by any fra- 
ternity or group of fraternity men during the working 
season, and no fraternity men shall give a banquet 
prior to the "working" season. 

Resolved, further -.—Thai if a candidate is not 
pledged at this time he is not eligible for membarship 
to any fraternity until May 1st of the same year, 
except by special arrangement of the Fraternity 
Conference. 



Y- M. C- A. fio-tes. 



THE LIBRARY. 



Everyone connected with the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College is cordially Invited to avail himself 
of the privileges of the Library and Reading Room. 
The librarian and his assistants will be at the service 
of all those in search of information and should be 

freely consulted. 

The administration of the library will be based 
upon the honor system: that is students will have 
free access to the Library shelves, catalogs, etc., the 
only restriction being that nothing is to be taken from 
the Library until after it has been properly charged to 

the borrower. 

A large measure of self-help, self-acquaintance 
and knowledge of the catalogs, indexes and location 
of the books is greatly to be desired in every user of 
the Library, and the Librarian will endeavor to be of 
especial assistance in this direction. 

The Library and Reading Room will be open every 
day in the year except Sundays and legal holidays 
from 8 to 12 a.m., 1 to 6 and 6-30 to 8-30 p. m. On 
Saturdays the afternoon hours will not be observed. 

The Reading Room will be open on Sundays from 
9 to 12 a. m. and 6-30 to 8-30 p. m. 

Users of books are requested to consult the books 
at the tables as much as possible, and to avoid con- 
versation that is likely to annoy. 

Charles R. Green, Librarian. 



"Thoughtlessness." was the subject of Dr. Fenn's 
address at the Y. M. C. A. vespers Nov. 8. The 
subject was treated in a scholarly way and the impor- 
tance of thinking before acting was clearly emphasized. 
Dr. Fenn. of Harvard University, began his address 
by saying that more lives were wrecked among col- 
lege men by thoughtlessness than through any other 
cause. Several instances were cited by way of illus- 
tration. He spoke of the forest fires which devastated 
the forests of New England a short time ago, and 
how they were caused by "thoughtlessness" is one of 
the greatest sins of today. There are evil men with 
us but they are diminishing in numbers. Thoughtless 
people are always with us and growing in numbers. 
Ch.ef function of wise is to repair the blunders of the 
ignorant. Thoughtlessness is far more responsible 
for the trouble in the world than is malice. Inten- 
tions are not so important. It is the act irrespective 
of the motive which often determines a change of con- 
sequences. In the world of personality motives count. 
In the world of material acts count. 

In closing, Dr. Fenn said that it was the saddest 
thing in the world to see the doors shutting behind a 
man and his life work. He must do his appointed 
work in the world and never lose his religious faith 
through thoughtlessness. 

The regular mid-week meeting on Nov. 12 was 
conducted by H. L. White, '09. The subject 
for consideration was "Friendship. ' ' After appropri- 
ate scripture reading, reference was made to a book 
entitled -Friendship," by Hugh Black. Mr. White 
gave abstracts of some of the chapters contained 
therein and emphasized the value of making true 
friends. Duty to one's best self is made impossible 
through evil companionship. Jesus, the genuine 
friend, "cleaves closer than a brother." The 
meeting was very helpful and Mr. White succeeded 
in awakening new thoughts on the subject worthy 
of every man's careful consideration. 



COLUMBUS STUDENT BIBLE STUDY 
CONFERENCE. 

M. A. C. was represented at the First International 
Student Bible Study Conference held in Columbus, 



Ohio, Oct. 22-25. by George M. Brown, Jr., 1909. 
This conference was the first one of Its kind ever 
held, and was attended by more than 1000 delegates 
representing between 300 and 400 colleges of this 
country and Canada. The splendid enthusiasm and 
force of the speakers together with the interest and 
earnestness of the delegates gave to the gathering a 
tone of inspiration throughout. Undoubtedly a great 
impetus to efforts along the lines of Bible study In 
educational institutions was developed by the power- 
ful meetings in Columbus. 

John R. Mott presided over the conference. In a 
stirring address delivered by him at the opening ses- 
sion he reviewed the progress of the movement of 
voluntary Bible study in colleges and dwelt upon Its 
importance in character building and its value in 
terms of national life. He quoted a German expres- 
sion that "one-third of the German students become 
failures through dissipation, one-third through over- 
study, but the remaining third governs the German 
Empire." Claiming that the Bible study movement 
was the most powerful movement among educational 
institutions today, he likened these institutions, in 
their relation to national life, as occupying the same 
position of strategic importance that 203 Metre Hill 
occupied in the Russo-Japanese War. "Capture 
these educational institutions and you capture the 
United States and Canada." 

The evenings of Thursday. Friday and Saturday, 
and Sunday afternoon were given over to mass meet- 
ings which were addressed by President King of 
Oberlin College, Editor McDonald of the Toronto 
Globe, Robert E. Speer and others. On Sunday 
afternoon, when Booker T. Washington spoke, nearly 
5000 persons packed the hall, while hundreds were 
turned away from the doors. These mass meetings 
were the most impressive features of the Conference. 
The morning sessions were limited to delegates and 
many practical phases of the Bible study movement 
were here dealt with. At these sessions addresses 
were given by Prof. Jeremiah Jenks of Cornell, 
Dean Bosworth of Oberlin, Prof. Shailer Mathews. 
Colonel Lamed of West Point and others. These 
sermons proved very helpful. 

During the afternoons of the conference delegates 
met in smaller sections to discuss plans and problems 
of the Bible study work met with in different institu- 



tions. These sectional gatherings held much of 

practical value. 

The point most emphasized throughout the whole 
conference was the power of inspiration coming from 
Bible study as a living, vital force in the lives and 
characters of men. 



Dfp&rtm*rvf flotts^ 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 
DEPARTMENT of plant and animal chemistry. 
Mr. E. B. Holland, since 1892 connected with the 
Experiment Station, first as assistant chemist and 
more recently as associate chemist, has been offered 
an important commission in connection with the U. 
S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington. Mr. Holland 
is at present in Washington representing the station 
at the meeting of the association of Official Agricul- 
tural chemists and also attending the annual meeting 
of college and experiment stations. It is believed 
that he wll not accept the Washington offer, but will 
continue In his present position. 

Mr. P. H. Smith will represent the station In 
Chicago, Nov. 28, at a meeting of station men particu- 
larly interested in formulating uniform methods for 
conducting experiments in animal nutrition. Mr. 
Smith will also attend the National Dairy Show and 
will visit the University of Wisconsin and Michigan 
Agricultural College before returning, 

W. K. Hepburn is making the annual inspection 
of the creameries of the state. 

The fertilizer division has completed its analysis of 
commercial fertilizers, and a bulletin prepared by Mr. 
Haskins on this subject Is now In press. 

E. F. Gaskill has been to Concord for the purpose 
of obtaining notes from the asparagus growers there 
which notes will be used with chemical experiments 
to show the effect of nitrogen as a fertilizer when used 
either in spring or summer or in both spring and sum- 
mer upon the asparagus plant. 

The improvements and repairs involving $4000 on 
the administration building of the experiment station 
have just been completed. New floors and windows 
have been put in and other extensive repairs and 
improvements made. The most Important change, 
however, is the putting of the large fireproof vaults 
for the keeping of the records and copies of the publl- 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



63 




cations of the station, on all three floors. Many of 
these old publications are now invaluable, as it would 
be impossible to replace them. The springing up all 
over the country of numerous agricultural schools and 
colleges has brought many demands for files of the 
experiment station publications and but few complete 
sets are now to be had at any price. 

BOTANY. 
The new hot-house which is being built south of 
Clark Hall is rapidly nearing completion. This build- 
ing is about 70 feet long and 27 feet wide. It is 
divided both by a partition running cross wise through 
the middle and by a partition running lengthw.se. An 
extension of Dr. Stone's own design, connects this 
with Clark Hall, opening into the cellar and the 
laboratory The entire building will be used both in 
connection with the Experiment Station and the col- 
lege work. The extension will be used as a potting 
shed and for storage and aquaria purposes. The 
plans for the work have been drawn by A. T. Stearns 
& Co of Boston, being modeled after those of Mr. 
Patten' the carnation grower of Tewksbury. The 
carpentry work is being done by Stewart and the glaz- 
ing by Bruce. 

POMOLOGY. 
The Senior class in Systematic Pomology has been 
studvinR this week a collection of California grapes 
sent in from Lodi, California, by C. S. Pomeroy 
formerly Experimentalist in the Division of Horticul- 
ture The box contained seven varieties, viz. Tokay, 
Emperor, Black Prince. Comichon, Ferrara. Verdal 
ard Sabalskanski. The fruit was packed in a new 
style of closed box, not in a crate as is usual with 
table grapes, and the packing material was granulated 
cork. Some of the bunches weighed as high as two 
pounds and all were in perfect condition. 

Professor Sears last week attended the Pomologi- 
cal Society meeting in Waterville, Me., and Profes- 
sor Waugh spent two days in Montreal studying parks. 
LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 
The Senior class in Landscape Gardening has been 
occupied lately in designing a few architectural 
details for the improvement of the college campus 
Noble has been designing a bridge for the upper end 
of the pond. Phelps one for the lower end, Curran a 
waiting station, Neal a band stand. White a sun dial, 
Redding a new terrace for South College, etc. 



Alumni. 



1910 Index will be ready Decem- 
ber 10. Price, postpaid, $1.75- Send 
check or money order. Address 

F. T. Haynes, Bus. Mgr. 

NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The twenty-third annual reunion of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College Club of New York will be 
held Friday evening, Dec. 4, 1908, at the St. Denis 
hotel Broadway and 1 lth Street, Charles E. Lyman. 
•78, president, Joseph F. Barrett, *75, toastmaster. 
Exhibit of photos of buildings and faculty members, 
and books written by graduates. Formal speaking 
limited You are certain of a reunion replete with 
old-fashioned "Aggie fellowship." Dinner tickets, 
«3 qq Yours in M. A. C 

John A. Cutter. M. D., '82, Secretary. 
281 West 31st Street. 

A large number of Alumni of the college now 
expect to attend the scientific meetings which are to 
be held at Baltimore during the Christmas holidays 
and hope to hold a meeting while there. Dr. H. T. 
Fernald will also be in attendance and will have with 
him plans for the proposed new entomological building. 

The alumni were well represented at the Springfield 
game Nov. 14. Among those present were the 

following: 

Judge Lyman, '71; Herbert Myrick, '82; Dr. 
Paige, '83; Dr. Stone, '86; Dr. Boynton, '92; T. 
S Bacon C. L. Brown, Professor Howard, '94; A. 
S*. Kenney, '96; G. C. Hubbard. '99: W. R. Pier- 
son, '01 ; G. D. Jones, A. V. Osmun, '03 ; S. B. 
Haskell, H. M. Wnite, '04; W. A. Munson, H. F. 
Tompson, '05; L. H. Mosely. F. C. Pray, '06;^ G. 
H. Chapman, J. N. Summers, R. J. Watts, '07; 
B W. Bangs, T.A.Barry, G. R. Cobb, W. J. Cole- 
man, S. L. Davenport, P. W. Farrar, C. S. Gillett, 
K E. Gillett, H. M. Jennison, J. R. Parker. W. S. 
Regan, F. E. Thurston. T. L. Warner. R. D. Whit- 
marsh, '08; M. S. Pixley, ex- '77; W. W. Colton, 
ex-'06; G. W. Searles, ex-'07; Coleman, Ex- '09. 
Ex-'77 .— M. S. Pixley, 38 Sumner Ave.. Spring- 
field. Springfield Fire and Marine Building, corner 
Maple and State St. 



» 87 D r _ e. R. Flint spent his second summer 

on the Isthmus as a physician in the employ of the 
Canal Construction Co. He is Professor of Chem- 
istry and University Physician at Florida State 
University. 

>90._F. J. Smith, care of Pierce Phosphate Co., 
Pierce, Fla. 

'90.— Dr. F. S. Taylor, Medical Director, The 
Walter Baker Sanitarium, 524 Warren St.. Boston. 

»91.__Dr. E. P. Felt, State Entomologist of New 
York, has recently issued his annual report for 1907, 
an unusually large and valuable contribution to the 

subject. 

>94 c. P. Lounsbury, Government Entomologist, 

Cape Town, S. Africa, has recently sent in some 

specimens of the largest scale insect thus far known, 

measuring nearly an inch in diameter. 

•95 a f. Burgess, who was connected with 

the Gypsy Moth Commission at Melrose Highlands 
during the summer has returned to Washington for 
the winter. 

'97. —Charles I. Goessman is to spend the winter 
in Worcester. 



'00.— R. D. Gilbert, 254 Arlington St., West 
Medford. 

'02. Frederick R. Church, Shelburne Falls. 

'02. -The Geneva Experiment Station of New 
York has recently Issued a bulletin written in part by 
H. E. Hodgekiss, which treats of Thrips as a cause 
of silver-top, and of a mite attacking carnations. 

•05. —Mrs. Walter B. Hatch of Torrington, 
Conn., has been recently visiting her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Ball of North Amherst. 

-05.— A. N. Swain visited college recently. 

'06.— C. W. Carpenter of Monson and H. M. 
Wood of the Copake Iron Works, New York, visited 
college last week. 

»06. C. E. Hood is the author of a circular 

entitled "The White Fly," recently issued by the 
Massachusetts Experiment Station. 

'06. -Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Pray who have been 
spending two weeks with Mrs. Pray's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Hall of North Amherst, left last 
week for Natick, where they will spend a few days 
before they leave for their home in Cuba. 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



r>i£UE>r^» oruo store 




6 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 



STOR^ 

AMHERST 



TAIIvOK 
II AMITY STREET, 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4. 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
TROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabar's Jrni, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Old South Street, off Main, 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 FEB. DAT. 

When in " Htmp." atop with us. 



Inter-Collkgiatk Bureau of Academic Costume 

Colle ge Caps and 6oudii$. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



It's Your Next at the 




Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 
Tuesdays 
Wednesdays, 
Thursdays, 
Fridays, 
Saturdays, 



a. m. to 8 P. M. 

M 6 « 

M g M 

M g " 

■ 8 " 

11 " 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE COE-mORTimER Wmi 



2 4-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT 6 DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It I* generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRKiHT & DITSON 
have the beat looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The WRIOHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIOHT <Ss DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

18 WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




"For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

JS. A.. THOMPSOIV, 

Rear First National Bank, AMHERST 




Gaps and Gotcns 

Makers to 06, 07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , New York. 












THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




AMHEKHT DIVISION. 

Cars will leavr Aniherntand Northampton on the hour and 
half hour from H.30 a. m. till 10.80 P.M. Sundays the first car 
will leave at 8.30 a.m. 

Main okfick, Gkkknuki.d, Mass. 
John A. Taxgart, Supt. 

NOBTHAMPTON OFFICE, 102 MAIN 8T. 

C. W. Clspp, Asst. Supt. Telephone, Northampton, 12612. 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Come tome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall. 




t& 





GO. 



WANTED 

COLLEGE. MEN AND WOMEN 
to act as our Sales Agents. Earn enongh during the sum- 
mer to pay your expenses for the next year. Our propo- 
sition offers 40% prfit. No capital required. Write for 
full particulars. Catalogue and samples free. 

FRANK W. WII_I_IAM» COMPANY 
1209 W. Taylor St., Chicago, 111. 



DENTAli ROOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK. AMHERST, MASS 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherct. 



E. B. niCKINSDN, D. D. B. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ... . AMHERST. MASS. 

OFFICE IIOUBS : 

8 TO IS A.. **.-, 1-30 TO 6 I». M. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired 



Central Yermont Railway Co, 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1908. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m., 
express, and 5.38 p. m. The 5.38 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 
6.20 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 




WEBSTER'S 

INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONARY 

A LIBRARY IX ONK ItOOK. 

Besides an accurate, practical, and scholarly 
vocabulary of English, with 25,000 NEW 
WORDS, the International contains a History of 
the English Language, Guide to Pronunciation, 
Dictionary of Fiction, New Gazetteer, Now Bio- 
graphical Dictionary .Vocabulary of Scripture, 
Greek and Latin Names, English Christian 
Names, Foreign Quotations, Abbreviations, Etc. 

I.1SO l\\<.l,S. /iOOO I I.I.I STKATIONS. 
SllOlLO YOU N OT OWN Sl'CU A BOOK? 

WITS-ITU'S COLLEQIATE DICTIONARY. 

Lare>' t • f our al.riilifmtiits. K.tfulnr and Tlim l'aper 
.: K. 1116 1'Al.l'S AND 11 ll.LlSTHTIONK. 

Write for "The Story of a Book"- Free. 
O. & C. MiKRIAM CO., Springfield, Mass. 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH 



W Main St. 



Northampton 



Mii-miir ISiock, near Depot, Open every day. 

hunches, Confectionery, Cigurs Noted for lt» excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

1 lowed only from 1 a. m. to 4 A. M. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTURER OK 

SODA WATEKS, 

i'ineapple. Lemon and German Tonic, Kirch Ileer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



KlVKK Street, 



Southampton, Mass. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR, 

1 1. is r. (vivid the latest fiihrics for the aprtag and summer 
trade of '07 lu Gentlemen's Garmeuts. Also does Ladles' 
(iHrineiitH in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

^-Military Work a Specialty..^! 
Under the Post OlHce, - - Amiik.k.st, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE, 

Everything New andUp-lo-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity ami Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDHICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



1VI.A..O. .A.(t*t, 



O. H.WKllIt, •«>»» 



Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S^SATISFAOTION C»XJA.lWk.IsrTB3BD. 9^25* 

II. A. VTLET, Managrr. 

OFKICB : 

East Pleasant Stxaet. 



Students* Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THE 



COIvIyEGE STORE). 

The Children are llappt. 
BVcsuse their clothes are made on the Nkw IIomf J-ewikg 
Machine, which fact, bbsbks them of no "rljih." Mothers 
should fret one st once as It will do for their children in years 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 



DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, HI. A. C. 




Telephone. 



Arthur B. Dorr. L. H. Tourtelott*. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DIALERS AMD JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Corner North and Union St*., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 832-2. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STAPLES 

CHASES' BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE, 



Telephone Connection, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Official 
Implements 
for all 
Track and 
Field Sport* 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



Uniform* 
for all 
Athletic 
Sports 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



Spalding's handsomely Illustrated catalogue of 

all sports contains numerous suggestions 

Mailed free anywhere 

A. O. SPALDINQ & BROS. 

New York Chicago Denver SanFrancjsco 

Boston Philadelphia Kansas City Minneapolis 

Buffalo Pittsburg Cincinnati New Orleans 

Syracuse Baltimore Detroit Cleveland 

Washington St. Louis Montreal.Can. London.Eng. 



J. H.TROTT 

PIPER. STEBIH 4 GHS FITTER. 

HUD DEALER II STOVES HB HIKES. 



Shop 15 i-a North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-n. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Raceive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITOREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLKTK LINK OF OOOD8 
8UITRD TO TH« STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OP 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY OOODS. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL 



II 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



J. A. 

PLEASANT ST., 



TURNER. 

OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 

HOTEL HAMILTON^" 

HOLYOKE, MA88. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



rtiwas, 



AMHOSf , ftA«. 














I 



■ 



-4j3»-tTH 



flfoaeeacbusetts 

Boricultuval 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

- OFFERS 



1 SHORT COURSES »» follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both ^sexes^ 
AppUcants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish cert.hcates of good 
character No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School or Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
Wh Tells. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
wftb heTarger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for al persons 
desiring to Lprove the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agncul- 
ture and horticulture. 

o A "FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
Admission* granted on certifiC ate from approved high schools and academies. Requ.red 
/rTrinrF^shman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
* ^^IT^S of th.it work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General HorU- 
^L™^^Fk*Llta« f Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Vetenn- 
^S^Z^oej, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Mod... Languages, 

Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3 POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kehton L. Buttertield, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SI&SA1 



FOOTBALL NUMBER 



VOL- 19 



NO. 6 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. DECEMBER 9. 1908 






We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO 



Page's SDoc Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 

E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VIOLIN, BftHJO, JWAflDOblN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



H U FIBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 
If, A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



THE MANAGER OF THIS PAPER USES A 

Smith Premier 
Typewriter 

AND IS PLEASED TO SAY THAT IT GIVE- 

Perfect Satisfaction. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over ioo good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



■e. ~* '£• "" 
Z i ? f 



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First Half 



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A#lJOi r__y_-|_S__. 

A TTtMPTfO f~F\—< 



0*£R C£* T£f ' OF ClNE wt M i M ' M i jn i m i mh wOj 



I JDBtf-KM EMkfQ. 



(^r_T_-_-f rr. zzz 

'■^j-j^Mf^oJIJJf^. ^ 



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&aaU ews 








WZUffJu"'™" Second HA L r 

FPFORWARD PASS x x t-FUMBLE 

THE TUFTS— M. A. C. GAME 



OSK- ON SIDE KICK— RUN 

**♦*+♦* PENAL Tr— KICK 

\-\—*—RUN BACK OF KICK 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS., DECEMBER 9. 1908 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Stuclents and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collioi S.ohal. Aukkst. Mass. Tmb Siokal will be 
sent to all subscribers until Its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BR1GGS. 1909, Business Manager. 

W. R. CLARKE, 1910. Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON. 1 910. Assistant Business Manager. 
R C POTTER. 1909. College Notes. L. C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

M. F.' CEER. 1909. Alumni Notes. H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Department Notes. 

C H WHITE, 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notes. A. H. SHARPE. 1911. 

E. M. BROWN. 1911. 



Tenia. |LOO per aear la adcance. Single Copiee, ioc Pontage onteida of Ualt ed Stat— and Caaada . 1-c e«tra. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket- Ball Association, 
Base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate, 

Pro/. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burlce, Manager, 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad. Pres. 
FT. Haynes. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Poet Office at Amherst. 



Edrtori&ls. 



On account of the Christinas vacation the next 
issue of the Signal will not be published until Jan. 13. 



Word was received yesterday that Worcester Tech. 
will meet M. A. C. in a relay race at the B. A. A, 
meet this winter. 



It has been suggested that the Union entertain- 
ment, Saturday, Dec. 12, be held at 6-00 p. m. so 
that those attending the Informal may be present. 



A. C. plays Williams, why not a "hustling commit- 
tee" here, too? 



"Hustling Committee" is the term applied by 
Dr. S. B. Newton of Williams to what he suggests 
as a means of bringing out more football candidates 
another year. This committee is to be composed of 
three members of each class, and its object is to see 
that every man who seems "able to play the game 
show up at the first practice and continue to come out 
every day unless some good reason prevents." M. 



The Signal has two suggestions to make to the 
student body. 

1 . Suggested, that the student body in meeting 
assembled make the four class presidents and the 
president of the Union a committee of five to draw 
up a constitution. That this constitution contain 
clauses to the effect that there be elected annually a 
president, a secretary and if need be other officers. 
These might be the officers of the Senate. 
That the president preside at all mass- meetings and 
that the secretary record all business done at such 
meetings. That this constitution be discussed by the 
student body in meeting assembled and be ratified. 

2. Suggested, that all managers as well as 
assistant managers of varsity teams be nominated and 
elected by the student body in meeting assembled, 
The men entrusted to handle the students' money 
should receive their right to hold office directly 
from the student body. 



66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Athletic No-US- 



FOOTBALL. 

M. A. C., 6; Tufts, 6. 
Our season ended Saturday, Nov. 21, on Tufts 
Oval. The game was the last of the year for both 
teams and both meant to win. Tufts had superior 
weight and good speed and swept our line and back- 
field off their feet at times, especially during the 
early part of the first half. It took them only a few 
minutes to go three-quarters the length of the field 
for a touchdown. After that our men braced and 
held for downs six times, once on our two-yard line. 
We lost on downs only three times. Tufts made 
more on forward passes, onside kicks, trick plays, 
and line-plunging than we did, but Schermerhorn's 
kicking made yards for us. Our backs and ends 
were awake and recovered many fumbles and kicks 
at critical times. Crosby's breaking up an onside 
kick enabled Smith to try a goal that nearly suc- 
ceeded. Morse made a nice tackle late in the sec- 
ond half that prevented certain scoring by Tufts. 
After Morse's injury Smith played quarter and did 
very well considering it was his first game. Hosmer 
played an excellent game in the backfield. 

IN DETAIL. 

Crosby kicked off to Hubbard on his 10 yard-line. 
Hubbard returned the ball 20 yards. Tufts got busy 
right away and tore holes in our line and worked 
trick plays almost at will. In less than ten minutes 
they had the touchdown made and goal kicked. 
Score, 6-0 in Tuft's favor. 

Crosby kicked to the zero line, the Tufts man com- 
ing back 25 yards. Five plays brought them to their 
44-yard line where they sent an onside kick to Blaney 
on our 44 yard line. Schermerhorn soon booted the 
ball to Tufts' 22-yard line, but the return was good for 
18. We recovered a fumble but lost on downs at the 28 
mark. Tufts pushed the ball to our 36-yard line and 
lost on downs. Schermerhorn kicked and Tufts lost 
on downs. We rushed the ball 14 yards when a 
fumble gave Crossman a chance to do something. 
He did it, Morse kicked the goal, and the score was 

tied, 6-6. 

Again Crosby propelled the ball and it was brought 



to the 24 mark. A minute later a fumble gave us 
the ball. A loss of 5 forced a punt of 45 yards, but 
it came back 25. We held for downs on our 45 
line, made our distance and punted. Tufts had 
worked the ball up to their own 45 mark when a for- 
ward pass struck the ground. The penalty put the 
ball on their 25-yard line. They punted from their 
39 to our 38. We kicked from our 45 to their 35, 
and from the middle of the field the ball came to our 
5-yard mark, just as the half ended. 

In the second half, Tufts opened with a drive to 
our 5-yard line. The ball was returned 5. Scher- 
merhorn made a good punt but unfortunately it was 
blown outside at our 30-yard line. From there the 
home team carried it to within 2 yards of our goal 
but a stiff defense gave us the ball. Schermerhorn 
made a magnificent punt to the middle of the field, 
Blaney got in front of an onside kick, and Schermer- 
horn put the ball beyond the center line. Tufts 
came back with three long gains and three short ones, 
and the ball was ours at 25 yards. Schermerhorn 
again made 60 and Captain Turner recovered the 
ball, but we lost on downs at Tufts' 28 mark. Tufts 
punted 38 yards to Morse who was injured in the 
play. Smith went in at quarter. Hosmer started 
with a long gain but Tufts held at 15 yards. An 
onside kick gave them 35. A few plays later Smith 
received an onside kick that was not meant for him 
and Schermerhorn made his third extra good kick. 
Tufts lost the ball on their own 39 yard line and after 
a short gain Smith and Turner attempted a goal from 
the field, but it failed. The Medford kicker could do 
only 22 yards, and Crosby brought the ball back more 
than half of that. Smith tried a forward pass but it 
did not go far enough from the center of the line so 
the penalty put us almost on the middle line. 
Schermerhorn kicked and Tufts succeeded, by a 
series of short gains, in placing the ball on the spot 
from which we had kicked and we followed suit, gain- 
ing 5 yards in spite of our inferior return. Crosby 
blocked an onside kick and made 10 to the 35-yard 
line. After a net gain of 5, Smith made a nice try 
for a goal but failed. The rest of the game consisted 
mostly of an exchange of kicks by which we usually 
made good gains. An onside kick of ours went to a 
Tufts back but it was about as good as a punt. The 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



67 



game ended with the ball in Tufts' possession on 

their 40-yard line. The summary: 

M. A c. tufts. 

Crossman. I e. ' r. e.. Merrill. Porter 

Crosby, 1. t. r. t., Chase 

Durling. 1. g. r. g„ Costanza 

Alger, c. c, Houston 

Johnson, r. g. I. g.. Burt, Ireland 

Schermerhorn, r. t. 1. t.. Marr, Morton 

Turner, r. e. (capt) 1. e.. Hubbard 

Morse. Smith, q. b. q. b.. Dittrich, Brophy 

Hosmer, 1. h. b. r. h. b., Wallace, Bohlin 

Blaney. r. h. b. 1. h. b., Sheehy (capt.) 

Willis, f. b. f. b.. Hooper 

Score — M. A. C. 6 ; Tufts. 6. Touchdowns— Crossman. 
Wallace. Goals from touchdowns— Morse, Hooper. Umpire 
— Keady of Dartmouth. Referee— Murphy of Harvard. 
Field judge— O'Reilly of Holy Cross. Linesmen — Barry of 
M. A. C. and A. Hooper of Tufts. Time — 20-minute halves 

1911, 0; 1912, 0. 
The game of which the above is the result took 
place last Friday. The teams were very evenly 
matched, and the game was hard fought. The strong 
wind from the south enabled the Sophomores to 
reach the Freshman 9 yard line at the end of the first 
half, while in the second half Smith gained so much 
on exchanges at punts that he was able to take two 
trys for goals from the field, but both failed. The 
features were the fast work of the Freshman backfield, 
especially of Moreauand Smith, and Morse's 40-yard 
return of a punt. The summary: 

1911. 1912. 

Nickerson, I.e. r. e.. Curran. Wilde 

Damon. 1. t. r. t., Walker 

Smith, Whitney, 1. g. r. g.,Eisenhause. Merrill 

Burseley. c. c. Robinson 

Robinson, r. g. 1. g.. Durling 

Ostrolenk, McLaughlin, r. t. 1. t..Sheehan, Heatley 

Sharpe. r. e. 1. c. Tower 

Morse, q. b. q. b., Smith 

Pickard. 1. h. b. r. h. b.. Williams 

Adams. Pauly. r. h. b. 1. h. b., Moreau 

Pauly, Smith, f. b. f. b., Wood 

Score — 0-0. Referee — Sexton, '09. Umpire — Schermer- 
horn, '10. Head linesman — Crossman, '09. Linesmen — 
McLean, '12, and I. C. Brown, '11. Timer — Jennison, '08. 
Time — 20 and 15 minute halves. 



/ 



REVIEW OF THE SEASON. 

Three victories, three tie games, and three defeats, 
is the record of the 1908 football team. The work 
of the team was better than these figures show. 
Dartmouth, Yale and Williams were the only colleges 



able to defeat us, and their standing in the football 
world is too well known to need comment. They 
simply outclassed us, and nothing but defeat at their 
hands was looked for. 

As for the tie games, that with Vermont should 
have been a victory, as Vermont scored in the dark- 
ness on more or less of a fluke, in the last minute of 
play. In the Springfield and Tufts games we kept 
the ball in the enemy's territory most of the time. 
Both games were hard fought, as the rivalry was 
intense. A large crowd of rooters accompanied the 
team on these trips. 

Both games on the campus were victories. The 
first one, that with Rhode Island State, was only a 
try-out for some of our new men. New Hampshire 
put up a strong game at Manchester, being in the 
lead at one time. 

The total number of points scored against us was 
143, while we could make only 43. On the surface 
that looks like an extremely unfortunate season, but 
it should be remembered that our three big games are 
responsible for 112 of the 143 points. On the 
remaining six games the balance is in our favor. 

The team has been singularly unfortunate all the 
season. To begin with, the quantity and quality of 
candidates was rather low. The first string men 
were first class, but good substitutes were few. The 
class of 1908 took some good men with it, who have 
not been adequately replaced by men from the fresh- 
man class. For such a large class, good football 
material is surprisingly scarce. 

An even more potent source of trouble than lack of 
men was the frequency and severity of injuries. At 
some time or other during the season almost every 
man on the team was prevented from playing one or 
more games, or if they did play, it was at a great 
disadvantage. 

Two features of our play stood out above the rest — 
lack of fumbling on our part, and quickness to take 
advantage of the opponents' fumbles and misplays. 
The punting was practically as good as last year's but 
goals from the field were rare. Our forward passes 
and onside kicks were reasonably successful. 

M. W. Bullock was our coach throughout the 
season, and did excellent work for the team. He 
was assisted for a short time by G. R. Cobb, '08, 
who coached in the kicking department. Toward the 



68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



69 



end of the season W. A. Munson, "05, spent a few 
days on the line. 

Following are the individual records of the "M" 

men : 

Captain H. W. Turner, '09, age 22 years, weight 
178 pounds and height 6 feet, played in every game 
but the New Hampshire and Springfield. His work 
at end, especially his tackling, was excellent, notably 
in the Yale game. He did a part of the punting, 
placement and drop kicking. 

F. A. Johnson, '08, age 21, weight 178, height 6 
feet, was one of the few who played in every game, 
not receiving any serious injuries, although he played 
a strong game all the time. Tackle was his position 
and he often broke through and spoilt the play before 
it got started. He also kept his eye on the ball and 
got many fumbles. 

H. P. Crosby, '09, age 21, weight 183, height 5 
feet 1 1 inches, played fullback and center at 
Lenox High School. He has made the varsity every 
year since his entrance. This year he played every 
game at left tackle. His most serious injury was a 
broken nose received during the Tufts game. Crosby 
did all of our kicking off, and did some fine tackling. 
His star play was the touchdown against Springfield. 
S. S. Crossman. '09, age 22, weight 145 pounds, 
height 5 feet 8 inches, prepared for college at Need- 
ham High School, where he played end on the foot- 
ball team. A sprained ankle kept him from playing 
three games. He made end on the varsity in his 
freshman year. His specialty is fast footwork and 
tackling. His most spectacular play was his touch- 
down against Tufts. 

G. F. Sexton, '09, tackle, age 22, weight 179 
pounds, height 5 feet 1 1 inches. He prepared for 
college at Worcester High School, where he played 
all the line positions. He has been singularly unfort- 
unate this year. He dislocated his elbow, severely 
tearing the ligaments, in scrimmage practice, soon 
after the first game, and was out for the rest of the 
season. He has played in the line at tackle every 
year since he came to M. A. C. 

P. E. Alger, '09, center, age 21, weight 162 
pounds, height 5 feet 1 1 inches, played in every game 
and was also prominent in all, especially against 
Williams and Yale. This year's was almost his first 
attempt at football, but he made good from the start. 



His play is fast and aggressive, often breaking through 
and going down under punts. He hurt his knee 
severely in the Yale game, and his shoulder in the 
Tufts game. 

L. G. Willis, '09, fullback, age 21, weight 182 
pounds, height 5 feet 10 inches, formerly played 
guard on the Melrose High School team. This year 
he did not return to college in time for the first 
games, but, beginning with Yale, he played a strong 
line-plunging game in which he severely Injured his 
knee- This was his fourth year on the varsity team. 
H. J. Neale, '09, halfback, age 22, weight 158 
pounds, height 6 feet. This was Neale's first attempt 
at the varsity, and he made good for all the games 
but two, Springfield and Tufts. He was fortunate in 
regard to injuries. 

J. P. Blaney, '10, halfback and next year's captain, 
age 21, weight 147 pounds, height 5 feet 7 inches, 
played fullback on Swampscott High School team. 
He has played two years here at half, and is good at 
both end runs and line plays. He is a consistent 
player, and handles punts well. His injuries were not 

severe. 

L. G. Schermerhorn, '10, tackle, age 21, weight 
177 pounds, height 6 feet, played tackle at Rhode 
Island State for two years before coming here. Since 
then he has played both in the line and in the back- 
field, but this year at tackie almost entirely. He is 
good there, but he shines particularly when he is called 
upon to punt. He equals or outdistances all his 
opponents, and was especially brilliant at Tufts. An 
injury to his chest in the W. P. I. game kept him out 
of the Williams game. 

W. E. Leonard, '10, end, played tackle for Bel- 
mont High School before coming to M. A.C. He is 19 
years old, weighs 170 pounds, and is 6 feet one inch 
tall. He piayed in all but the Tufts game. He is 
especially strong on the forward pass proposition. He 
has escaped without serious injury. 

C. I. Hosmer, "10, age 21, weight 160 pounds, 
height 5 feet 10 inches, got his preparation at Cush- 
ing Academy, where he played at fullback. He 
entered the junior class from the University of Ver- 
mont this fall, and has played at full or half in all the 
games but one. He is good at end runs, and tackles 
hard. 

M.S. Hazen, '10, guard, age 22, weight 175 



pounds, height 5 feet, 9 inches, prepared for college 
at Rockland Military Academy, New Hampshire. 
He played guard and center while there. Here he 
is not a brilliant player but a consistent one. His 
most serious injury was a severely strained back. 

H. B. Morse, '11, quarterback, age 18, weight 
143 pounds, height 5 feet, 4 inches, came from 
Salem High School, where he played at end. This 
year he played the whole schedule at quarter. He 
never loses his head, and usually uses good judgment 
in his selection of plays. His tackling is hard and 
sure, and he runs back kicks very well. His only 
hurts were in the last game, when he twisted his ankle 
and got a heel in his sternum. 

H. C. Walker, '12, guard, age 20, weight 175 
Dounds, height 5 feet, 1 1 inches, he played guard 
and also halfback in Marlboro High School before he 
came here. This year he played in six games, and 
ought to develop into an excellent lineman by next 
fall. He was injured once in the knee. 

E. V. Durling, '12, guard, age 21, weight 190 
pounds, height 6 feet, 1 inch, played guard at his pre- 
paratory school, Brooklyn High. N. Y., before his 
entrance here. He entered so late that he got into 
only three games and so did not mak3 his letter. 
Judging from these games opponents find It hard work 
to advance the ball through Durling's position. He 
has been free from injuries. 

Other men worthy special mention are: Robinson, 
Ml, who played parts of several games at guard ; 
Thompson, '09, who played guard at New Haven; 
Partridge, '10, who went in at tackle during part of 
the Worcester game; Smith, '12, who played part of 
the Tufts game at quarter ; Merrill, '12; Nielsen, 
'II; and Prouty, '10. 



FOOTBALL OFFICERS ELECTED. 

J. P. Blaney, '10, was elected captain and R. H. 
Allen, '10. manager, of the 1909 football team on 
the evening following the Tufts game by this year's 
"M" men. J. F. Adams, '11, was elected assis- 
tant manager at the mass meeting held Wednesday, 
December, 2. 



and will play each of the classes. The game sched- 
uled between the Sophomores and Freshmen Is not 
the regular class affair. This will come later. The 
object of the series is to bring out material for the 
varsity. The schedule follows : 

Dec. 8— 1909 vs. 1911; 1910 vs. 1912. 
9— Alumni vs. 1910; 1909 vs. 1912. 

14— Alumni vs. 1912; 1910 vs. 1911. 

15— 1909 vs. 1910; Alumni vs. 1911. 

16— Alumni vs. 1909; 1911 vs. 1912. 
Captains and managers have been elected as 
follows: 1910 — C. I. Hosmer, captain and mana- 
ger. 1911 — C. A. Smith, manager; H. B. Morse, 
captain. 1912 — L. S. Caldwell, manager ; J. W. 
Coville, captain. 1909 has not made an election to 
date of going to press. 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL. 

A series of Interclass basketball games has been 
arranged. The local alumni have entered a team 



JUNIORS WIN CROSS COUNTRY RUN. 

Dee, '12, takes first honors with Holland, '10, 
a close second. 

The interclass cross-country run over the Sunder- 
land-Amherst course was held Monday, Nov. 23. 
The Juniors scored the largest number of points-77- 
although the Freshmen got first and fourth places 
with a total of 70 points. The Sophomores had 42, 
and the Seniors 21. The Junior class, besides get- 
ting this victory, is credited with 12 points toward the 
cup to be contested for in the interclass meets this 
winter and next spring. Also the Freshmen get 7 
and the Sophomores 3 toward the same cup. The 
first five men get individual cups as prizes. 

The course is from a point opposite the Mt. Toby 
House to the East Experiment Station and is 6 3-4 
miles long. The start was made at 1 1.45 A. M., the 
Junior runners taking the lead almost immediately, 
and keeping it nearly to the finish. Barrows, 'II, 
Dee, '12, and Tower, '12, were close rivals all the 
way although the main bunch did not fall far behind 
until about the last mile. At 100 yards from the 
tape Holland, '10, was leading with Dee, Barrows 
and Turner just in front of the remaining four Juniors 
Then Dee cut loose and got in just ahead of Holland 
The order of finishing of the first eight men is as fol 
lows: Dee, '12, first; Holland, '10; Barrows, 'II 
Tower, '12; Cloues, '10; Cowles, '10; Dickinson, 
'10; Paulsen, '10. The time was 39m 42 2-5s 
which was somewhat slower than the practice time. 




7° 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



7* 



! ■ 






This was due to the muddy condition of the road 
which made rapid work impossible. Every contes- 
tant was able to finish although some were well-nigh 
exhausted. The features of the contest were the 
team work of the Juniors and the individual efforts of 
the four leaders. 

The officers were: Referee— Dr. Reynolds. 
judges-G. H. Chapman, '07; T. A. Barry, '08; 

E. C. Fowler. Starter— L. S. Corbett.'09. Timer— 

H.W. Turner, '09. 



Collegt No*«S- 



A new window has been put in the west side of the 
dairy room In South College. 

A movable platform has been built and will be used 
in the Union for such of the weekly entertainments as 
can be held there. 

W. C. Johnson, '10, while performing a critical ex- 
periment in the chemical laboratory last week was 
burned about the wrist and hand. 

Professor J. A. Foord and trustee E. D. Howe, 
left Nov. 30 on a trip to study farm and college 
buildings at other agricultural colleges. 

H. W. Turner, '09, represented the student body 
at the annual banquet of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College Club of New York, Friday evening, 
December 4. 

Several members of the faculty attended the 
meetings of the State Board of Agriculture in Green- 
field last week. Dr. Paige and Professor Sears 
were on the program. The former lectured on "A 
Decade's Experience in Poultry Keeping," and the 

latter on 
Massachusetts." 



Each member of the Commission has been given 
special phases of the work for investigation in such 
ways as he may think fit. President Buttcrfield's 
lines of investigation are : Farmers' Organizations, 
Recreation, The Country Church, and Moral Con- 
ditions. On Nov. 12, 7,500 copies of a list of ques- 
tions prepared by him concerning these subjects were 
mailed to farmers, ministers and others interested in 
rural progress in all parts of the country. Replies are 
coming into the office at the average rate of sixty 
a day, in largest numbers from New England and the 
Middle West. Dr. Cance, who has had much prac- 
tical experience in farm life, is going over these in 
lots of one hundred, summarizing the answers, and 
almost daily mailing such summaries to President 
Butterfield en route. 



Dec. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

10— Y. M. C. A. 7-00 p. m. in Chapel. 8-00 

p. m. Senior Entertainment Rehearsal. 

Dec. 1 1— Senior Entertainment Rehearsal 7-00 p. m. 

in Chapel. 
Dec. 12— Union Entertainment. Hendrickson and 
Rosani-, Magicians. Informal in Drill 
Hall. 
Dec. 13—Vespers, 5-00 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, 
Dr. W. D. McKenzie of Hartford Theo- 
logical Seminary. 
Dec. 15— Stockbridge Club 7-00 p. m. in Chapel. 
Dec. 16— Assembly 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. 
Dec. 17— Y. M. C. A. 7-00 p. m. in Chapel. 
Dec. 18— Christmas recess begins at 6-00 p. m. 
i an 4__ College exercises resumed, 
experience in ruu.u, ™-r-v> -"- J * • Stoc £ brld „ Club 7-00 p. m. Agricultural 

The Planting of a Commercial Orchard In Jan. o— stocKDnage o.uu B 

room. 
6— Assembly 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. 
7_Y. M. C. A. 7-00 P. m. in Chapel. 

9 Union Entertainment 6-30 p. m. In Union, 

by Fred E. Kendall, baritone, humorist, 
impersonator. 



Word has not been received from President Butter- 
field on his extreme western trip but he Is scheduled 
to be on his way back at present and will probably be 
In Amherst on Monday, Dec. 14. Thursday Dec. 
17, at 2 p.m., the Commission on Country Life will 
hold a special hearing for the Connecticut valley in 
the new building of the Phelps Publishing Company 
at Springfield. A general New England hearing will 
be held at the office of the State Board of Agricul- 
ture on the following day, Friday, Dec. 18, at 10.00 

A. M. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



INFORMAL RECEPTION. 

The women of the faculty of the College gave an 
informal reception to the student body at the drill hall 
last evening. Those in the receiving group were Mrs. 
K. L. Butterfield, Mrs. W. R. Hart, Mrs. P. H. 
Smith and Mrs. George Mills. During the evening 



the Cadet band played a few selections. Mr. Bur- 
nett of Amherst gave a reading entitled "How I 
edited an agricultural paper," by Mark Twain. Pro- 
fessor Ashley rendered several piano solos and the 
college quartet sang a number of medleys. Just before 
refreshments were served a grand march was held, ac- 
companied by college yells and ending in a college 
song. Dancing closed the evening. The committee in 
charge were Mrs. K. L. Butterfield, chairman; Mrs. 
G. E. Stone, entertainment; Mrs. J. B. Paige, re- 
freshments; Mrs. F. A. Waugh, decorations; Mrs. 
P. B. Hasbrouck, reception. 

The ushers were ; A. W. Hubbard, '09; J. B. 
Thomson, '09; Louis Brandt, '10; J. F. Adams, '11. 

The hall was well decorated with flags, bunting and 
banners. At the north end were placed four large 
serving tables decorated with green and white. The 
candles on these tables made a pretty effect "hen 
tr.e arc-lights were turned off. 



WINTER MEETING AT GREENFIELD. 

The public winter meeting of the State Board of 
Agriculture for lectures and discussions was held 
st Washington Hall, Greenfield, Dec. 1, 2 and 3. 

The program follows : 

Tuesday, Dec. I. 

10-00 a. m. — Address of Welcome by Mr. E. B. 
Biake, Chairman Board of Selectmen. Response 
for the Board by Secretary J. Lewis Ellsworth. 

10-30a. m. — Lecture: "The Sheep Industry in 
Massachusetts," by Mr. L.B. Harris, Lyndonville, Vt. 

2-00 p. M.— Lecture: "The Planting of a Com- 
mercial Orchard in Massachusetts," by Prof. F. C. 
Sears. Professor of Pomology, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 

800 p. m. — Lecture: "Lessons from a Decade's 
Experience in Poultry Keeping," by Dr. James B. 
Paige, Professor of Veterinary Science, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

Wednesday, Dec. 2. 

10-30 a. m.— Lecture: "Profitable Bee Keep- 
ing," by Charles Stewart, Johnstown, N. Y. 

2-00 p. m. — Lecture: "The Cow and the Man, — 
Twins of the Dairy Industry," by Prof. H. H. Dean, 
Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ontario. 

8-00 p. m. — Banquet under auspices of Greenfield 



Board of Trade. Address: "School and Farm," 
by Prof. Rufus W. Stimson, Director Smith's Agri- 
cultural School, Northampton. 

Thursday, Dec. 3. 

10-30 a. m.— Lecture : "The Profitable Use of 
Commercial Fertilizers," by Dr. E. B. Voorhees, 
Director New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tions, New Brunswick, N.J. 

At 2-00 p. m. a visit will be made to the historic 
town of Deerfield. 

Admission to all lectures free to the public. 

Lectures will be followed by discussion, In which 
persons present are invited to engage. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '87. 
//. Student Labor. 

In section six of the act incorporating the trustees 
(Acts of 1863, Chapter 220) we find it provided that 
in establishing the by-laws and regulations of the col- 
lege, they should make such provision for the manual 
labor of the students on the college farm as they 
might deem just and reasonable. In their third re- 
port (January, 1866) reference was made to such 
labor as one of the distinctive features of the college 
and one that had elicited much comment ; that 
learned men, connected with education in the ordin- 
ary mode, generally doubted the success of the ex- 
periment. This labor, however, was to be required, 
primarily, for the education of the student and not 
for profit, and the time devoted to it was to be gradu- 
ated accordingly. The trustees appeared to think It 
important, so far as possible, to arrange the classes 
so that the professors might superintend the students 
in their labors. 

In the course of study and instruction, referred to 
in the trustees' report two years later, it was stated 
that it had been the Intention to arrange the recita- 
tions and lectures so as to allow half ot every day for 
manual labor, or for study, as might be desirable. 
During the fall term all students were to be required 
to labor, without pay, two hours every other day, and 
those who wished it were to be paid for additional 
work at the rate of twelve and one-half cents per 
hour, or in special cases, where the amount and kind 



} 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



73 



■j 



of labor would warrant it, a somewhat higher rate. 

The trustees in their next report (January, 1869) 
discussed the matter of a "labor fund." They 
thought there was another method, besides that of 
scholarships, of assisting indigent students, which was 
peculiarly suited to the circumstances and object of 
the college, viz. : to furnish them labor at fair wages 
whenever they desired it, both in term time and in 
vacation, except perhaps in the winter, when they 
could earn more in teaching or some other business, 
and when their work on the farm would be less valua- 
ble than at other seasons ; that this employment of 
students for money had been practised during the 
previous year and with satisfactory results ; that a 
large amount of farm work had been performed, and 
that the young men had proved faithful and industri- 
ous. As the college had no funds to appropriate to 
this object, it was suggested that if the liberal-minded 
and large-hearted friends of agriculture and educa- 
tion would establish a fund of perhaps $100,000, 
the income of which should be expended for the labor 
of the students on the farm and in the garden, several 
most desirable things would be accomplished. Contri- 
butions of money were made by trustees aud others 
for the maintanance of indigent students, but there 
appears to be no record of the establishment of such 

a fund. 

In 1870 the trustees voted that all required manual 
labor be paid at from ten to fifteen cents per hour, 
the price to be determined by the professor of agri- 
culture, and that the faculty have authority to excuse 
from manual labor advanced special students, and 
members of the Senior Class, who, having previously 
distinguished themselves in any branch of science 
desired to devote special attention to the same. 

In the eighth annual report of the trustees (Febru- 
ary. 1871) the farm superintendent, Mr. Dillon, was 
quoted as saying that most of the money paid to 
students for labor had been well earned: that this 
meant more than at first sight might appear; for to 
earn a given sum when embarrassed with study, and 
the necessity of constant change between the barn 
and the lecture-room, required a far greater effort 
than was needed when there was no such conflicting 
claims. He was quoted further as suggesting that if 
either by appropriation from the State or by private 
beneficence a fund could be provided for employing 



industrious students at a fair rate without too strict 
regard to the Immediate value of their labor, the 
farm would be benefited, the interest of the students 
in its operations would be increased, habits of in- 
dustry would be fostered, and a very deserving class 
of young men, who would unite through practical ex 
perience with accurate scientific knowledge, muli ta 
encouraged and assisted to become valu'b.e m 
bers of the agricultural community. 

President Clark must have felt keenly the need ot 
rendering financial aid to deserving students, of whom 
there was always many in the student body, for we 
find him expressing in 1876 the opinion that nothing 
had so severely checked the growth of the college as 
the high rate of tuition and the want of means 
so abundantly provided in other colleges for the 
pecuniary assistance of worthy but indigent students. 
His view was evidently shared by the trustees, for in 
1877 we find them urging that a labor fund, or else a 
comprehensive system of scholarships, should be 
established for the benefit of the institution ; that ii 
they had the income from a labor fund of $50,000 or 
$100,000, a fair and liberal compensation could be 
paid for the labor of students, which would be to a 
certain extent educational and at the same time 
would enable the student to pay his way, preserving a 
certain degree of manly independence of feeling, and 
increasing the income of the college by the payment 
of a reasonable charge for tuition. 

The Legislature of that year (1877) took the 
matter In hand and appropriated the sum of $2,500 
to be expended under the direction of the trustees for 
manual labor which students might perform who were 
residents of the Commonwealth, butno student should 
be paid more than $100 during one year. This legis- 
lative aid does not appear to have been continued. 

The Legislature of 1889 (Resolves, Chapter 12). 
however, provided that there should be paid for the 
term of four years, from the treasury of the Com- 
monwealth, to the treasurer of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College at Amherst to be expended under 
the direction of the trustees, the sum of $5,000 for 
the establishment of a labor fund to assist needy 
students of said college, the said sum to be paid in 
equal quarterly payments. This legislation was re- 
newed in 1892, 1896 and 1900, and was made per- 
petual in 1904. 






It is understood that this fund is used only in assist- 
ing students who are citizens of Massachusetts and 
who are dependent entirely or in part on their own 
exertions ; that application for student labor must be 
made directly to the President; that applicants must 
present a certificate signed by parent or guardian 
and by one of the selectmen of the town in which 
they reside, showing that they need the aid; and 
that studetits whose deportment or class work is not 
satisfactory are not likely to be continued in student 
labor. 



Y- M. C- A. flo-te s. 

Mr. E. C. Worman, Yale, '08, elected college 
secretary for Massachusetts and Rhode Island, has 
been at the college this past week and rendered very 
helpful service by way of encouraging the men and 
discussing plans for making the Association more of a 
power in college. He believes that the association 
is exercising a good influence In college and helps to 
stimulate the lives of the men who support it into 
more active service, and further, that college men, 
who will be called upon to occupy positions of respon- 
sibility in the world need the training and spiritual 
uplift afforded by the Association. 

Mr. Worman spoke at the Thursday evening meet- 
ing on Dec. 3. His subject was "Sacrifice." The 
thoughts expressed were in the main as follows : — 
"From the lowest forms of animal life to the highest 
we may observe lessons of sacrifice. In looking 
through a microscope we see a new world of life, one 
cell breaks up to form other cells. In higher forms 
parent life gives itself to offspring; all sacrifice them- 
selves for other forms of life. So it is in the social 
world. Our great generals give up their lives for the 
love of country, our men of literature give their lives 
in unstinted service for those they love. 

The college community is a unique whole; there 
are men who are sacrificing their time and energy in 
supporting what they feel to be a worthy cause. 
Some men are playing their part for sake of self. 
God pity the man who abides by himself alone. His 
influence will not last. If such a man would lift the 
curtain which shuts him in he would see a sorry sight 
of opportunities neglected, of responsibilities unshared. 
What organization in college shall I support? The 



one I can give the most to in helping my fellow men 
and of being of service to Christ. Bob Galey, 
Princeton's great fullback, who had many good 
offers which would tempt a man, went to China as a 
missionary because he felt he owed his life for ser- 
vice in Christ's great kingdom. 

Consirie l Association, its purpose and work. 
Are you m >... .^ the sacrifice needed to make your 
better self mean the most to your college associates?" 

D?p&rtm?ivf fJot?s. 



FRENCH HALL AND THE NEW DURFEE 
GLASS HOUSES. 

The unusually mild weather of the past month has 
been especially favorable for work on the Instruction 
building and glass houses which are being built for 
the departments of floriculture and market gardening. 
Tne exterior work on the instruction building is about 
complete and the interior is just ready for the plaster- 
ers. The contractor expects that the building will be 
ready for occupancy February 1 . 

With the exception of the rose house the glass 
houses are glazed and the heating pipes are being In- 
stalled. Many of the benches and beds are yet to be 
put in and the range will be used but little during the 
present year owing to the lateness of the season. It 
is expected that some short rotation crops will be 
grown as soon as the benches are finished and the 
heat available. The grading about the buildings will 
not be finished this fall; sufficient work is being done, 
however, to keep the surface water from the con- 
crete foundations. At a recent meeting of the 
trustee committee on grounds and new buildings it 
was voted to recommend to the board of trustees that 
the name of the instruction building be French Hall, 
in honor of Henry S. French, the first president of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, and that the 
glass houses be known as the New Durfee Range of 
Glass Houses. 



Alumni. 



At the recent convention of College and Experi- 
ment Stations in Washington, D. C. the following 
were present: S. W. Fletcher. '96, of Virginia; W. 
P. Brooks, '75; E. B. Holland, '92; G.A.Billings, 



ii 



II 

II 




74 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•95, of New Jersey; J. A. Foord, C. H. Fernaid. 
Dr. Fernaid spoke on the Post-graduate School at 

M. A. C. 

At the recent meeting of the Association of Offic- 
ial Agricultural Chemists held in Washington, several 
old M. A. C. boys were present. Trustee Bowker, 
•71, spoke on the Utilization of all waste products. 
G. D. Leavens, '92, of New York city advocated the 
Wagner method for determining the availability of 
basic slag. Mr. Haskins, '90, of the Massachusetts 
Experiment Station had two articles, one on inorganic 
plant constituents, as referee, and the other on the 
subject of basic slag. Other alumni present were 
H J. Wheeler. '83, and B. L. Hartwell. '89, of 
Rhode Island; C. H. Jones, '90, of Vermont; E. 
B Holland. '92, of Massachusetts; S. W. Wiley, 
'98 of Baltimore; J. W. Kellogg. '00. of Harris- 
burg, Pa. ; H. L. Knight, '02, of Washington, D. 
C. ; C. Bates, '08, of Washington, D. C. 

The Commission on Country Life held a hearing at 
about the same time at which Trustee Bowker 
expressed his ideas concerning the better regulation 
of country national banks in relation to meeting the 
financial requirements of farmers. 

The following alumni were present at the Tufts 
game- W H. Bowker, '71; R. B. Mackintosh. 
G E." Stone. '86; B. A. Kinney, '82; F. H. Fow- 
ler '87- H. C. Bliss, '88; H. M. Howard, H. N. 
Legate.' "91; W. S. Fisher, '98; B. H. Smith. 
•99. F H Brown, H. S. Crane. '00; J. H. 
Chickering, 01; C. S. Holcomb. C. W. Lewis G. 
W Patch, W. M. Sears, A. N. Swain, A. D. Tay- 
lor H F. Tompson. Mrs. C S. Whitaker, G. N. 
Willis '05; F. H. Kennedy, F. C. Pray, '06; Clin- 
ton King, Miss L.vers. '07 ; T. A. Barry, H. C. 
Chase, C. Dolan. K. E. Gillett, T. H. Jones. T L. 
Warner, T. F. Waugh, H. T. Wheeler, '08; Blake, 
ex-'08; G. P. Hammond, G. H. Robb, ex-' 11. 

74 Lin the Lewiston Morning Tribune of Lewiston, 
Wash', dated Nov. 13, there appeared this account: 
The Seattle Daily Times of Nov. 8 contains a full 
page announcement of the coming session of the 
State Conservation Congress of the state of Wash- 
ington which will hold its session at Seattle on Nov. 
20 2 1 ' Accompanying the announcement are photo- 
graphs of the men who will be identified with the 
work of the congress, these including E. H. Libby, 



of Clarkston, who will preside at the congress and 
who has been elected president of tne Washington 
Forestry association. The election of Mr. Libby to 
this latter position, came without his knowledge and 
is deserved honor to one who has so prominently 
worked on broad lines in the development of the 
inland empire. Mr. Libby has long been recognized 
as a leader among those identified with irrigation 
development, and has been closely associated with 
large movements, conspicuously in this regard being 
his active, persistent advocacy of the open river to 
the sea. He has been a leading factor in the work 
of the Commercial organizations of Lewiston and 
Clarkston and through the work of the Lewiston- 
Clarkston company, with its irrigation, land and power 
enterprises, he has been largely responsible for the 
growth and development of the valley in all lines. 
His wide exDerience and practical accurate knowledge 
of the northwest industrial conditions, and the 
influence the natural resources bear to the same, 
together with his boundless confidence in the future 
of the north Pacific region, will be of great value in 
promoting the objects of the Seattle meeting, 

'82.— John A. Cutter, M. D.. 251 West 81st 
Street, New York, Secretary of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Club of New York, in a circular 
pertinent to and sent out previous to the twentv-third 
annual reunion of that club last Friday evening, had 
the following: Men of M. A. C. :— In answer to the 
queries on the work of our Alma Mater, we can say 
that it has graduate! men, like so-called classical 
institutions, who are successfully engaged In law, 
medicine, ministry, engineering and manufacturing; 
also many successful farmers and men holding presi- 
dential and professorial positions in institutions grant- 
ing degrees in science, engineering and arts, and 
connected with the U. S. Department of Agriculture 
and the State experiment stations. It has been 
among the pioneers in the revolution as to teaching 
the so-called natural sciences and promoting experi- 
mental work; the immortal Agassiz said Clark's 
investigations in the phenomena of plant life alone 
were worth all that had been spent on the college ; 
Goessmann's enormous labors cannot be recapitulated 
here; we note only his demonstration that the beet 
sugar industry would be profitable and that his work 
on fertilizers resulted directly in the Massachusetts 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



75 



and Federal laws that have saved the farmers of the 
whole country millions of dollars; Stockbridge's early 
lysimetre experiments made him the first apostle of 
the ''dust mulch" culture so largely used in the 
West on lands having small rain fall. 

'82. — Herbert Myrick In a letter to the Springfield 
Republican of Dec. 3, takes afirm stand for no-license 
and suggests that in the event of no-license, a place 
shall be substituted tor the saloon which "as a social 
center shall be more attractive, not so costly 
to patrons and free from the evil tendencies of the 
saloon." 

'95. — Prof. R. A. Cooley, entomologist of Mon- 
tana Agricultural College, expects to visit Amherst 
during Christmas week. Professor Cooley will be on 
his way to attend a meeting of the American Associ- 
ation for the Advancement of Science to be held in 
Baltimore. 

'95. — Sec. H. D. Hemenway gave an illustrated 
lecture on the Carnegie flower garden competition at 
the Home Culture Club of Northampton last Wednes- 
day evening. 

'00.— J. W. Kellogg of Harrisburg, Pa., was in 
town recently. 



'05. — Born, Nov. 19, to Mr. and Mrs. Bertram 
Tupper of West Newton, a daughter. 

'05. — L. S. Walker has been appointed junior 
steward of the Pacific Lodge of Masons. 

Ex- '06. — First Lieut. Racicot of the Marine 
Corps visited college recently. 

'07.— F. A. Cutter and M. H. Clark were at col- 
lege last week. 

'07. — Geo. S. Chapman has been appointed junior 
deacon of the Pacific Lodge of Masons, Amherst. 

'07. — W. E. Dickinson left North Amherst Nov. 
28, for Cuba, where he will spend the winter as 
chemist in a sugar refinery. 

'08. — H. E. Alley has entered the employ of the 
Gypsy Moth Commission. 

'08. — Frank Hutchings of Manchester, Conn., 
spent Thanksgiving at his home in South Amherst. 

'08. — Clifford Dolan has resigned his position in 
Putney, Vt. and is now in Hudson, Mass. 

'08. — Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Wright spent Thanks- 
giving with Mrs. Wright's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Farrar of Amherst. 

Ex-'ll.— R. F. Hyatt and R. E. Wheeler are 
in Washington working for Martin L. Davey. 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 
3 ft. by 6 ft., - - - $4.00 

Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DEUEL/'S JT3KUO STORE 












** 



7 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOR MEN 




Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAIU)K STORE 

II AMITY STREET. - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Tklefhonk 54'4- 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

AIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



RaDar's 3tin t 

OM South Street, off Main. NORTH AMI'TON, HAM 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Orounds, Excellent Cuintne. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " lUmp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



INTER-COLLKGIATK BUREAU OF ACADEMIC COfTOMS 

College C aps and 6ou?ns. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 



Merst House Bam shod 



Four First Class Barbers 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



Open Mondays from 


J A. M. 


to 8 P. M 


Tuesdays 


T " 


6 " 


Wednesdays, 


, M 


8 " 


Thursdays, J 


r " 


6 " 


Fridays, 


. ii 


8 " 


Saturdays, ; 


. ii 


ii " 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Kxcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

< tur Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE C0E-[HTIHI1 GQH1PRNY 



a4-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It fa generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WR IOMT & DITSON 
have the best looking. 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The WRK1HT A DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIOHT «& JniT»OIV 

344 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON 

ig WEST 30TH ST., M.W YORK 
Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




44 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



E BALL 
SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 
UNIVERSAL REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 



K. A. THOMPSON, 



Rear First National Hank, 




AMHEKSI 



GapsandGoicns 

Makers to 06. 07, 08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , Nkw York. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CounectiGut Valley Street Baliwau Co. 

AMHKHHT DIVISION. 

Citr, will leave A mhentliKl Northampton OB«M hour MM 
hall IkouM 'rl.m • N a m. till 10.30 r. M. Sundays the first car 

Will »°» Ve » t8 ^* N oVriCB. GRBKKKIEU. MA8B. 

John A.TaKgart Supt. 

Northampton OFFICB, IW Main bt. 

C. W. CUPP. RglKSr T elephone, Northampton. 12542- 

"Don't Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Come tome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 



WANTED 

COL. LEGE MEN AND WOMEN 
to JT« !Tur Sales Agents E am •"&*">£*"£; 
m,-r to uav vour expenses for the next year uur P™vy 
"tionoffis^oXprnt No capital jrcmdnL Wlfc ** 

full particulars. Catalogue and sam Pj" ™» A iyv 

Vl N "r^ W,LI - ,AM * COM C^c N aIo, 111. 
1209 W. Taylor St, ^ — 

O. »• GATES, 13.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS, 



Opposite Town Hall. 



CUTLKR'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



MM & MM M Railway Co. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Bop*. 
Telephone 71-2 Amheret. 



E. H. DICKINSON, D. D. B. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

AMHKRST, MASS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - • AMiiaiw , 

office Hooks: 

9 to is J^. **.. i-ao to o s»- vr. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when de.ired 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1808. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m , 
express, and 5.38 p. m. The 5.38 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
Btations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 

6.20 P. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

3 J. W. HANLEY, 

General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 




INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONAKT 

Beslde« an accurate, pract cal. and ■«*oJwlT 
vocabulary of English, with 25.000 **;« 
WORU8 the International contains a History of 
X«Fn?i«hIanEua?o, Guide to Pronunciation, 

graphical Dictlor-ary.Vocabulary of Scripture. 
Greek and Latin Names. English t y ar "" B = 

•>-t«i« PAI1KS. MMM) 1 Lil.l .J»l «.'* * l ~5L*jL, 
RBOCLDIOVKOT OWN SLC1I A ItOOK" 

WF.nSTT-.R-8 V ICTI °t£ 

U 2SutaL MM flLLlWMTIO 

'< Writo for "The Story of a Boc V Free 
i| ti. & C M.CF.RIAM CO.. Sr^m-tic 



c.\nY. 

rain Vaprr 

ree. 

Id, Mass. |i 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH 



Ti Main St. 



Noktmami-io.n. 



Masonic Itlock, near l>epot, Oprn everyday. 

I„unch«tf, Confectionery, « i«ar* Noted for iU excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chow.ler. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. u. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

SODA W'ATEKS, 

i'ineapple, Lemon and Uoruian Tonic, Birch Beer and Uinger 
Ale. Fountain* charged to order 



Kivek Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DP STORE. 



OUR ICE CREA|W SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



POWERS* 
THE TAILOR. 

Has nceivt'd the latest fabrkfl for the spring sue! summer 
trade of '07 iu Genii, men's Garments. Also doM Ladies' 
Garments iu a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

fcJ-M Hilary Work a Specialty ^££ 
Uuder the Post Office, - - Amhkkst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp-to-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment 



M.A.C. AiC*t, 



O. K.WICItlt, *0© 



Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

" Thursday delivered Saturday. 

fQfSATISFAOTION OT_T.A.R./^IsrTEEID.*^* 

If. A. UTLMY, Manayrr. 

office : 

E a s t X'lesuaa.aa.t Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THK 



COLLEGE STOKE, 



The Children me Happy. 
BNHN their clothes ore Bad* OS the Nkw Homk Pewiru 
Maciiink, which fsct, assure* thetu of bo "rii.H." Mothers 
should iret one at once as it will do for their children in years 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 




DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. k. C. 

Telephone. 



PHOTOGKAPHE 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



Arthcr E. Dorr. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



L. H. TOURTKLOTTE. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AMD JOBBERS I» 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts.. Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, ' - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STARLES 

CHASES' BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AMHERST, MASS 



Uniforms 
for all 
Athletic 
Sports 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



Official 
Implements 
for all 
Track and 
Field Sports 

Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue of 

all sporU contains numerous suggestions 

Mailed free anywhere 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 
73 Federal St., - ■ Boston. 



J. H.TROTT 

PU1BER. STEHUl k BBS FITTER. 

HID DEHLEB II STOVES UD MIGES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 3 6 -' 1 - 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Raggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE AMHERST 

FORNITDRE and CARPET STORE 

A COMI'LKTK LINK OK GOODS 
SUITED TO THK 8TCDENT8' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 

EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPOKTEBS AMU MAMCKACTCKEKS OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY OOOIDS- 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Aim. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - . Amherst, Mass. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



LET . 



"BILL' 

PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

J. A. TURNER. 

PLEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKERV. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rales to College Men. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MAS8. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER 6 CO. 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



f^iw&s, 



ArtHttSf, t\m. 






I 







^^STHE 



flfoassacbusetts 

Horicultural 

Colleae 



AMD 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF ROSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



♦ 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both ^sexes. 
Appl cants must be at least sixteen years old and must fnrnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

( C \ A Summer School or Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
hurh schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for al persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agncul- 
ture and horticulture, 
o A TOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Reqmred 
ftuZs during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
.tud.es ™""* theJr worb> Cour8eB are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 

S£ pS^F^toulto™. Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening Botany, Veterin- 
^ Scie-e, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, MathemaUcs, Modem Languages, 
Chemistry, ZoSlogy, etc. 

3 POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



*• - 



THE COLLE&E MEAL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 7 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 






• - 



AMHERST. MASS., JANUARY 13, 1909 



i 






We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



page's SDoe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARG 



STOCK 



Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




E. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OP TIC IAN. 
VIOLIN, BANJO, WAfllDOIilN, GUITAfl STRINGS. 

OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 
best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 
branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

190 Pearl St., - - Hartford, Conn. 



H U RBEIR'S 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 13. 1909 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication, should be addressed. Coixaoa Siokal. Ahhiut. Mas*. The Sioml will be 
S!*h! \ SH^LH l,,di,COnt ' nu * nce '» " ter « d " ,d ^-'»*"P'«- Subscriber, who do no. recer,. their paper regularly are reaped to 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

O. B. BR1CCS. 1 909. Busbies. Manager. 

W. R. CLARKE. 1910. Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON. 19 10, Assistant Business Manager 

C. M. WHITE. 1909. Y. M. C. A. Note*. a. H. SHARPE, 1911 

E. M. BROWN. 1911. 



Tama, ai.OO per sat In Kwiw, Single Copiea, 10c Pottage ottttda of U.lted State* ax) Caaaaa Ma. axtre. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 

Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-Bali Association, 
Base Bail Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sac. 
M. W. Thompson, Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index 
Y. M. C A. 

Musical Asaociation. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad. Pres. 
F. T. Haynes. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pre*. 
L. S. Dicklnaon, Manager. 



Entered a. second-claa. matter, Peat Off lea at Amherst. 
wntw *. »%«\i»i\, (Mrasia. 



Editor. &ls. 



Informal January 16. 



Those of our students who are Interested in the 
two great American sports, baseball and football .should 
glance Into the Baseball Magazine. It is issued 
monthly and is full of each sport In its season. College 
athletics are being given special attention, such men as 
President Eliot of Harvard, Camp of Yale and many 
other prominent men contributing. The Magazine is 
well illustrated by numerous photographs of athletes 
and athletic events. No one who wishes to keep 
himself informed along this line of activity should 
neglect looking this periodical over. 



and all arrangements made. While this course is 
designed primarily for the benefit of the regular stu- 
dents in the agricultural college, outsiders will be 
admitted as long as they do not Interfere with the 
regular classroom work. This will give an excellent 
opportunity to many persons who wish to secure a 
general knowledge of forestry principles without great 
expenditure of time or trouble. 



The lectures on forestry, to be given at the agri- 
cultural college this year by the state forester, Prof. 
P. W. Rane, will begin on Monday, the 25th, and ex- 
tend through the week. There will be 10 or 12 exer- 
cises in all, including lectures and demonstrations in 
the field. The schedule of hours has been prepared 



The 1910 Index Board is due congratulations for 
getting out the college annual on time — yes, before 
time. It Is not only gratifying to the undergraduates 
to have the book placed in their hands before the 
Christmas holidays but it is sound business policy. 
The Index Is fully up to the standard of the college 
annuals published by the Junior classes of recent 
years. While reading matter is very limited, a spicy 
briskiness in the tone of the book and its artistic well- 
balanced composition makes it a commendable pro- 
duct of undergraduate enterprise. The cover design 
is simple and appropriate. While the plate work is 
good, the photographs from which the half-tones were 



• 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



79 



M 




made were not apparently of the best. The line 
drawings are especially good, yet in cases unappro- 
priate The cut for athletics is not representative of 
all athletics, while that for the musical organizations, 
artistic and well rendered though it be. fails in appro- 
priateness as a collegiate suggestion. The ed.torials 
are timely, and President Butterfield's contribution 
entitled " A Glance Ahead," is characteristic both of 
the author and of the college he loves. The grinds 
are numerous and in variety and, as ever, appreciated 
best by the Junior classman. The feature of the 
book is found in the personal sketch section. Like, 
nesses of present and past are remarka bly striking. ^ 

/UMetic N°*«S- 



BASKETBALL. 

R. 1. State College, 27; M. A. C, 21. 
In the Drill Hall, Saturday evening, January ninth, 
the basket ball team opened its season by suffering a 
defeat at the hands of the Rhode Island State college 
team by a score of 27-21. The game was very a 
hardly contested one from start to finish, but Rhode 
Island had the advantage of better team work. Both 
teams lacked the ability to shoot accurately. 

Schermerhorn started the scoring by shooting a 
basket for M. A. C. Smith almost Immediately 
secured one for Rhode Island. At first, the score 
remained extremely close but Rhode Island gradually 
took the lead, and the half ended with the score 14 to 
10 in their favor. In the second half, both teams did 
faster work, though Rhode Island kept the lead. M. 
A C took a brace towards the end of the game and 
ran our score up to 21 . The game ended with score 
27 to 21 The lack of team work was evident 
all through the game, but it may be attributed to the 
fact that it was their first game. 

Capt. Smith of Rhode Island was the star of the 
game, scoring eight of the twelve baskets secured by 
his team. Capt. Burke and Schmerhorn excelled 
for the Aggies. 

The line up was as follows: — 

RHODE ISLAND STATE. 

E. Smith (capt.). 1. I. 
Sullivan. Dole. r. f. 
Warner, c. 
W. Neale. 1. g. 
H. Smith, r. g. 



Score -R. I- S. C. 27. M. A. C.21. Goals from the floor 
_R I E. Smith 8. Warner 2. H. Smith and W. Neale ; M. 
A C Burke 4. Schermerhorn 2. Neale 2. Hosmer and 
Regan. Goals from foub-E. Smith 3. Burke. *•*"•*- 
Chapman. '07. Timekeeper- jennison. '08. T.me-20- 

minute halves. 

1909, 23; 1911. 7. 
After the Thanksgiving recess an interclass basket- 
ball schedule was arranged and the first games of the 
schedule between 1909 vs. 1911 and 1910 vs. 1912 
were played on the evening of Dec. 7. The first 
game was fast and exciting, the seniors literally run- 
ning away with the 191 1 team. The game ended. 
23 to 7 Noble. Neale and White starred for the 
seniors, while Smith and Warren showed up well for 
the sophomores. 
The line-up: 

SENIORS. 

Waters. Neale. r. f. 
Warner. Wilson. I. f. 
Neale. (capt.). Turner c. 
White. 1. g. 
Noble. Webb, r. g. 



SOPHOMORES. 

r. g., Nickerson 

1. g., Sharpe, Racicot 

c, Warren 

r. f.. Smith (capt.) 

1. f., Larrabee, Johnson 



Score-Seniors 23. Sophomores 7. Goals from floor- 
Neale 4 Noble 3. White 2. Warner, Wilson. Smith 2. Larra- 
bee Goals from fouls-Neale. Smith. Referee-Burke 
., ' Timer-Lindblad. Time-15 and 20-minute halves. 

1910, 25; 1912, 13. 
The second game of the schedule between 1910 
and 1912 was played immediately after the senior 
and sophomore game. From the start the juniors 
seemed to own the floor and ran up 25 points without 
any trouble. Then the second junior team was put 
in after which the freshmen braced and managed 
to' get 13 points in the last few minutes of play. 
Hosmer. Schermerhorn and Burke played exception- 
ally well for 1910. while Oppel led the freshmen. 
The line-ups : 

FRESHMEN. 

r. g., McGarr 

i. g.. Brett 

c, Oppel 

r. f., Moreau 



m. a. c 

1. g.. Neale 

1. g.. Hosmer 

c, Schermerhorn 

r. f.. Regan 

1. f., Burke (capt.) 



JUNIORS. 

Burke, 1. f. 

Leonard, Brandt, r. f.. 
Schermerhorn, Clarke, c 
Hosmer (capt.). Paulsen, 1. g 



1 f Pierson, Muller 
Waldron. Cloues, r. g. 1 . , „ nnr 

Score-Juniors 25. Freshmen 13. Goals from floor- 
HosmerS. Burke 2. Schermerhorm 3. Waldron. Leonard. 
Oppel 2, Brett 3. Moreau. Goals from |ouhj-Ho.iner. 
Muller. Referee-Neale. W. Timer-Lindblad, 09. 
Time _20 and 15-minute halves. 



HOCKEY. 

M. A. C, 6; Northampton Y. M. C. A., 0. 

The hockey game of last Friday with the North- 
ampton Y. M. C. A. resulted In a 6-0 victory for the 
varsity. The game was fast and interesting, and a 
few new men were tried out. Norris started the 
scoring in the first half by a difficult shot from near 
the left center. Bentley, who had taken Norris' 
place shortly after, scored the second goal just before 
the half closed. 

The second half opened with the 'varsity showing 
more speed and team work. Sanctuary shot two 
goals in rapid succession. Peckham followed with 
another from a sharp angle. Urban was called in to 
Hemenway's place and Puffer replaced Sanctuary. 
Peckham was hurt in a collsion and Dee took his 
place. Bentley shot the last goal just before the 
whistle blew. 

On the whole the 'varsity showed more life and 
snap than in the game with Springfield. The ice 
was good, and the team pulled together better. 
Brandt, Peckham and Sanctuary played an espe- 
cially good game. Peckham seems at his best when 
carrying the puck past his man. Brandt and Sanc- 
tuary are best in a crowded field. Hayes and Day 
were the stars for the visitors. 

The line up : — 

M- A. C. Y. M. C A. 

Brandt, r. w. r. w., Warner 

Peckham (Dee), r. c. r. c, Day 

Sanctuary (Puffer). 1. c. 1. c. Livermore 

Norris (Bentley), 1. w. 1. w.. Hayes 

Adams, c. p. c. p., Kerns 

Hathaway, p. p., Cary 

Hemenway (Urban), g. g. Depot 

Score— M. A. C . 6; Y. M. C. A.. 0. Goals made— by 
Bentley 2. Norris. Sanctuary 2. Peckham. Stops made — by 



2. Timekeeper — Regan. '08. Referee 
Halves — 20 minutes each. Attendance 



Hemenway, Depot 
—Doctor Reynolds. 
-198. 

M. A. C . 2; S. T. S., 0. 
Our new hockey team won a fast game from 
Springfield Training School on the College pond, Dec. 
12. It was the first game on our schedule and our 
players performed very well, considering the amount 
of practice and coaching they have had. Peckham 
was the star, scoring both our goals. Norris and 
Adams also did well. Coulton and Brlggs excelled 
for Training School. 



The line-up : 












M. A. C. 










S. T. S. 


Brandt, Bentley, I.e. 










I.e.. Coulton 


Norris. l.w.. 










l.w., Cuillon 


Peckham. r.c. 










r.c. Wright 


Sanctuary, Puffer, r.w. 


, 








r:w.. Field 


Adams, c p.. 










c p.. Gabon 


Hathaway. Sanctuary. 


p.. 








p., Briggs 


Hemenway. g.. 










g., Birgeman 


Goals — Peckham 2. 


Referee- 


-Dr 


Reynold 


s. Umpire - 


Summers. Timer— 


- Barry. 


Scorer 


— Mu 


Her. Time— 


15-minute halves. Score — M. A. 

• — 


C.. 


2. 


S. T. 


S.,0. 



THE TRACK MEET. 

On Saturday, Jan. 23, the annual interclass ath- 
letic meet will be held. The outdoor events will 
commence at 2-30. The events and number of 
men competing from each class are as follows: 

1000 yards run— 4. 
600 yards run — 3. 
440 yards run — 4. 
Relay race — 4. 3 laps each. 

The indoor events will be called at 8-00 in the 
Drill Hall. The events and number of men com- 
peting from each class are as follows : 

30 yards dash — 6, first 2 men qualify. 

2 semi-finals, first 2 men qualify. 

Potato race— 4, four first men qualify for finals. 

Obstacle race — 2. 

Rope climb — limited to 3 men. 

Human obstacle race — 2 teams. 

Rescue race — 2 teams. 

Rescue race— 2 teams. 

Sack race— 2 men. 

High jump— 5 men. 

The points secured by each class in this meet will 
go toward aiding that class to secure a leg on the cup 
this year. The class of 1909 won the cup last year, 
but on this year's contest 1910 is leading with seven 
points, as a result of winning the cross country run 
last fall. 



THE TRACK TEAM. 

A good number of men are turning out every day 
for track work. They are improving rapidly in form 
and speed. A training table of ten men was picked 
Monday, and has gone into strict training for the race 
with W. P. I. in Boston next month. Last Friday 
the fastest time that had been made for three laps 
was 51 2-5 seconds. Dr. Reynolds expects to get 












THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



8. 






80 



that mark down to an even 50 before the week is 
over The B. A. A. record for three laps of the 
same length as our track is 47 3-5 seconds. The 
men on the squad are: H. W. Turner, captain, 
Hathaway, Crossman, O'Grady. Warner, Dickinson, 
Holland S. C. Brooks, Cloues, Damon, French, 
Barrows, Dudley, McLaughlin, Cohen, Finnegar 
and Burrill. 



College N**^ 



Jan. 9. 
13. 
16. 
22. 
30. 
Feb. 20. 
27. 
Mar. 6. 
13. 
Manager 
pending. 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE. 

Rhode Island at Amherst. 
Williams at Williamstown. 
Holy Cross at Worcester. 
Springfield T. S. at Amherst. 
Dartmouth at Hanover. 

Springfield T. S. at Springfield. 

Worcester "Tech" at Amherst. 

Open. 

St. Lawrence Univ. at Amherst. 

Lindblad has several other games 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Jan i4_Y. M. C. A. 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 

Jan. 15— Senior Minstrel Show 8-00 p. m. in Town 

Hall. 
Jan. 16— Informal 4-00 p. m. in Drill Hall. 
Jan. 17— Vespers 5-00 p. m. In Chapel. Speaker 
Rev. C. W. Merriam of Greenfield. 
Jan. 19— Stockbridge Club 7-00 p. m. in Agricultural 

Room, 
jan 20— Assembly 1-30 p. m. In Chapel. Speaker. 
Professor George B. Churchill of 
Amherst College. 
Jan. 21— Y. M. C. A. 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
Jan 22— Basketball 8-00 p. m. in Drill Hall. M. A, 
C. vs. S. T. S. 
entertainment 6-30 in Chapel 
Speaker, Mr. Wm. A. Burnett. 
Interclass Track Meet. 
Ice Hockey. M. A. C. vs. Wil- 
liams at Williamstown. 
-Vespers 5-00 in Chapel. Speaker, Presi- 
dent W. E. Huntington of Boston. 
Jan. 26-Stockbridge Club 7-00 in Agricultural 
Room. 



Jan. 23— Union 



Jan. 24- 



Prof. H T. Fernald has returned from a visit to 
Philadelphia. 

R. S. Eddy, '10, was elected assistant manager of 

the track team. 

Capt. George C. Martin has been confined to his 

home by illness. 

J. R. O'Grady, '09, has been elected baseball 
captain for the season of 1909. 

Lockers for men living otf the campus are to be 
placed in the basement of South college. 

A course in Practical Bacteriology has been offered 
to those seniors taking veterinary science. 

The laboratory on the north side of the chemical 
buildings is being fitted with excellent lockers. 

At a recent meeting of the senior class F. C. 

Warner was chosen captain of the class track team. 

R C- Potter. '09. has been elected manager of 

the hocky team. Louis Brandt. '10. was elected 

captain. 

The manager of the 1 9 10 Index reports that there 
has been a rather large number of books sold. Don't 
forget to get one while they last. 

Mr. Fred E. Kendall, impersonator, gave a very 
interesting entertainment in the union rooms Jan. 9, 
at 6-30 p. m. This was the fourth entertainment In 
the Union series. 

On Dec. 16th, the assembly was taken up by a very 
interesting address given by President Butterfleld in 
which he gave a brief sketch of his trip with the 
Country Life Commission. 

Much time and labor is being expended in 
rehearsals In preparation for the Senior Minstrel 
Show which is to be given at the Town Hall. Amherst 
on Friday evening, Jan. 15. 

President Butterfleld left Amherst Jan. 6 and 
attended the annual Trustee meeting in Boston, on 
Jan. 8. Previous to the annual meeting he attended 
several Trustee committee meetings. 

Sunday, Jan. 10, President Butterfleld started for 
Washington, D. C. to attend the final meeting of the 
Commission on Country Life and to assist in drafting 
the report to be sent President Roosevelt. 



The newly formed Debating Club has ratified their 
constitution and elected the following officers: Presi- 
dent, R. A. Waldron. '10; vice-president. F. T. 
Haynes. '10; secretary, H. L. White, '09 ; treas- 
urer, H. W. Turner. '09. 

During the Thanksgiving recess. Mr. C. R. Green, 
the college librarian, attended the meeting of the 
Association of Librarians of the New England colleges 
at Brunswick, Maine, and incidently visited the 
libraries of Bowdoin and Tufts colleges and Harvard 
university. 

Beginning on Jan. 4, the gymnasium work of the 
whole battalion will be uuder the direction of Doctor 
Reynolds. It will continue until Easter, when the 
regular military drill will be resumed. The gymnastic 
exercises will consist of calisthenics, heavy gym 
work, and games. Only those members of the bat- 
tallion who are actively engaged in other athletic exer- 
cises will be excused from gymnastic work. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF TRUSTEES. 

[From Springfield Republican.'] 
The annual meeting of the trustees was held 
Jan. 8. President Butterfield's annual report was 
tne chief feature of the forenoon session, and it 
makes many Important recommendations for the 
development of the college in order that It may keep 
abreast of the times. 

Treasurer Kenney submitted the most detailed re- 
port which has ever been presented to the board. 

Facts were classifed under various heads and shown 
up in different connections, so as to bring out points 

in more detail than has ever been done before. The 
report showed a total deficit of $4,685. 

In President Butterfield's report the following 
recommendations were made by him. In regard 
to the equipment, buildings, laboratories and ap- 
paratus for teaching modern technical agriculture, 
the college at present not only fails to rank with the 
stronger agricultural colleges, but, aside from the 
new stable, it hardly makes a good comparison with 
the smaller agricultural colleges. He recommends, 
with great emphasis, that plans be prepared during the 
year for a suitable dairy building, large enough to 
cover development for several years, adapted to in- 
struction in butter dairying and milk dairying, 
and also adapted to college students and short course 



students. He also recommends that plans be pre- 
pared for an instruction building designed to house the 
division of agriculture, which should be called "Stock- 
bridge Hall," and to costless than $150,000, with 
offices, laboratory and class rooms. Perhaps half 
could be constructed at a time. 

Under the head of further needs of the college 
mention is made first of the proposed building for the 
department of zoology and entomology. A new build- 
ing is regarded as imperative, which should be fire- 
proof. 

In regard to the housing of the students. President 
Butterfield said that there are in the college 260 un- 
dergraduates, and probably not less than half of them 
live in private houses. Circumstances make it nec- 
essary for the college to declare its policy as to build- 
ing dormitories. If none are to be built, then the 
townspeople ought to know that they will have to 
house the students. Development of the grounds Is 
discussed in brief, and there Is a section devoted to 
the athletic field. 

Recommendations were made asking for $5000 
for the establishment of a Poultry Course. A new 
fruit storage house, dynamo, the repairing of several 
buildings were asked for. The president also recom- 
mends the development of departments of Agricul- 
tural Engineering, Forestry, and rural sociology. 
The graduate school should have $5000 more for its 
development. 

The former officers were re-elected. A petition 
will be presented for an appropriation of $80,000 for 
an entomological building and another for $30,000 
for a new barn. 



SIXTY MEN JOIN FRATERNITIES. 

The fraternity rushing season closed Thursday night 
at 6 o'clock and the freshmen pledged Friday morn- 
ing Dec. 1 1 in chapel. The results are as follows: — 

Q. T. V. — 1912. L. E. Dudley of Newton Center; 
1912, A J. Ackerman of Worcester, J. W. Covlll of 
Boston, E. S. Daniel of Ostervllle, L. E. Fagerstrom 
of Worcester, J. M. Heald of Watertown, F. B. 
Hills of Bernardston, E. J. Robinson of Hingham. 
E. R. Williams of Concord. 

Phi Sigma Kappa— 191 1. E. V. Warren of Lei- 
cester; 1912, E. N. Boland of South Boston, George 
D. Cabot of Winchester, F. A. Castle of Seattle, 



82 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



83 






Wash., W. G. Deming of Wethersfield, Ct., J. T. 
Finnegan of Jamaica Plain, D. B. Heatley of Fall 
River, T. Hemenway ot Winchester, E. J. Norris of 
Somerville, C. C. Pearson of Arlington, W. E. Phil- 
brick of Taunton, D. G. Tower of Roxbury, H. C. 
Walker of Marlboro, H. H. Wood of Shelburne Falls. 

c s. C. 1909, Paul E. Alger of Somerville; 

1910, C. I. Hosmer of Turners Falls; 1912, R. T. 
Beers of Billerica, E. B. Eastman, Jr.. of North 
Amherst, L. W. Gaskill of Hopedale, E. V. Durling 
of Brookline, F. B. Hickey of Brockton, Fred S. 
Merrill of Danvers. R. R. Parker of Amherst, J. E. 
Pierpont of Williamsburg, S. P. Puffer of North 
Amherst, J. F. Martin of Amherst, H. E. Smith of 
Medford, G. W. Tupper of Roxbury. 

Kappa Sigma— 1910. George Paulsen of New York 
city; 1912, W. J. Birdsall of Otego, N. Y., A. C. 
Brett of North Abington, J. A. Harlow of Turners 
Falls, M. C. Pratt of Lowell, E. I. Shaw of Amherst, 
L. s! Caldwell of Lynn, J. Carpenter, Jr., of Attle- 
boro, R. H. Wales of North Abington, E. I. Wilde of 
Taunton. E. M. Folger of Brockton, Q. S. Lowry of 

Canton. 

Theta Phi— 1912, E. M. Baird of Ashburnham ; 
F. H. Burr of Ringville ; R. K. Clapp of Westhamp- 
ton, F. 0. Fitts of North Amherst, A. F. Kingsbury 
of Medfield, A. R. Lundgrenof Orange. T. J. Moreau 
of Turners Falls. G. A. Post of New York city, W. 
C. Sanctuary of Amherst, E. R. Reed of Abington, 
R. A. Warner of Sunderland, S. Williams of Fall 
River. 



LARGE ENROLLMENT FOR SHORT COURSE. 

The registration for the short course closed Jan. 6 
with a total of 66 students, this being the largest short 
course class in the history of the college. The best 
previous record was a total enrollment of 41. The 
members being enrolled in the different courses are : 
Floriculture course. 18; creamery course, 16; gen- 
eral agriculture, including horticulture, 32. 

The list of students are as follows :— 
A. R. Adams, Northboro 

A. S. Adams, Shrewsbury 

F. C. Adams. Amherst 

L. H. Aldrich. Belchertown 

J.B.Allen, HaverhU1 

r 0. Allen, West Brookfield 



L. E. Avery, 
R. A. Badger, 
H. D. Barstow, 
Harry Bayer, 
A. Beaubien, 

E. F. Belchers, 
J. C. Bibber, 

Eugene Bodette, 

L. E. Brown, 

C. T. Clark, 

F. W. Cole, 
H. L. Copeland. 
Albert Creswell, 
W. K. Davidson, 
P. A. Derr. 
D. E. Drummey, 
O. E. Dustin, 

G. A. Felch. 

N.J. Fennelly. 

R. M. Forbes, 

H. J. Gallagher. 

C. W. Gaskill, 

E. W. Headle, 

Lee Hemenway, 

W. K. Hepburn, 

T. F. Holcomb, 

E. C. Howard, 

W. S. Imlay, 

Esther M. Johnson. 
H. N. Keith, 
C. W. Lyon, 
Augustus Larson, 
C. G. McDonald, 
Lizzie McGauvran, 

C. McGonlgle, 
P. E. McMaster, Jr., 
F. L. Midgley, 

D. A. Nelson, 

E. R. Nye, 
C. C. Ordway, 
William Osborne. 
E. M. F. Perrin. 
A. A. Phelps. 
E. O. Phillips. 

E. A. R. Schmitz, 

F. A. Smith. 
W. H. Smith, 



Plymouth 
Randolph, Vt. 
South Hadley 
New York, N. Y. 
Turners Falls 
South Framingham 
Freeport, Me. 
Bridport, Vt. 
Deerfield 
Reading 
Greenbush 
Colrain 
West Brookfield 
West Millbury 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Marlboro 
Monson 
Ayer 
Boston 
Worcester 
New Lebanon Center, N. Y. 
South Milford 
Bolton 
Bridport, Vt. 
Sunderland 
West Granby, Conn. 
Belchertown 
Ganesville, Ohio 
Cambridge 
Worcester 
Abington 
Pride's Crossing 
Medway 
Fisherville 
Worcester 

South Berlin, N. Y. 

Worcester 

Avon 

Russell 

West Newbury 

Cos Cob, Conn. 

Potsdam, N. Y. 

Southboro 

Huntington 

Danvers 

Fitchburg 

Great Barrington 



D. E. Stone, 
J. R. Sutcliffe, 
F. W. Tanner, 

R. E. Thayer, 
J. A. Tilden, 
C. W. Tompson, 
Harvey Turner, 
W. C. Ware. 
A. H. Warfield, Jr., 
Harlow Welch. 
W. E. Welch, Jr., 
L. A. Wilcox, 

E. L. Young, 



Attleboro 

North Billerica 

North Adams 

Franklin 

Ceveland 

Attleboro 

North Reading 

Concord 

West Brookfield 

Boston 

Boston 

North Pownal, Vt. 

South Hadley Center 



FORESTRY INSTRUCTION FOR 1909. 

Voted by the committee on instruction: 

1 . That the schedule of exercises in forestry be 
adopted as follows : 

January. 1909. 
Monday, 25th— 8- 15 and 9-15. 1-15 and 2-15. 
Tuesday, 26th— 10-15 and 1 1-15. 1-15 and 2-15. 
Wednesday. 27th— 10-15 and 11-15. 2-15 and 3-15. 
Thursday. 28th— 11-15. 2-15 and 3-15. 
Friday, 29th— 1 - 1 5 and 2- 1 5. 3-15. 

2. That in order to make room for this work in 
forestry, the Junior classes in arboriculture and in 
botany be closed Jan. 22. 

3. That students registered in these courses in 
arboriculture and botany be required to take the 
course in forestry. 

4. That other members of the Junior or Senior 
classes be permitted to take the forestry work on the 
express approval of the Dean. That such Juniors 
and Seniors wishing to elect the forestry must make 
written application to the Dean not later than Jan. 20. 

5. The Dean will make up the roll of the forestry 
class from the rolls of the classes in arboriculture and 
in botany, and from such other applicants as he may 
approve, and this roll will be given to the instructor in 
forestry. All persons so enrolled shall be required to 
attend the forestry exercises regularly. 

6. That in order that students may attend thus 
regularly they be excused from exercises conflicting 
with those scheduled herewith. 

7. That the instructor in forestry give a test or 
examination at the close of this course and report the 
standing of each student to the registrar, and that the 
registrar make separate entry of such marks. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REUNION 

of The Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Club of New York, at Hotel St. Denis, 
Dec. 4, 1908. 
President, Charles E. Lyman, '78 ; Toastmaster, 
Joseph F. Barrett, 75. 

Guests : Dean and acting President of the College, 
George F. Mills, A. M.; Professor Charles H. Fer- 
nald, Ph. D. ; Professor Charles Wellington, Ph. D., 
'73 ; Dr. Robert T. Morris, professor of surgery in 
the New York Postgraduate School and trustee of 
Cornell University ; Dr. Otto W. Lowe. New York 
City chemist, and Massachusetts farmer ; Henry W. 
Turner, '09. captain M. A. C. football team. 

Alumni Roll: Judge R. W. Lyman and W. D. 
Russell. '71 ; F. A. Ober and S. C. Thompson. 72 ; 
J. B. Minor and J. H. Webb, 73; J. F. Barrett and 
Dr. J. F. Winchester, 75 ; F. G. Urner, 77 ; S. D. 
Foot. G. H. K. Heath, C. E. Lyman, Dr. F. 
Tuckerman and Dr. J. H. Washburn, 78; A. L. 
Fowler, '80; Dr. H. E. Chapln and E. B. Rawson, 
'81 ; C. E. Beach, Dr. J. A. Cutter, E. S. Jones 
and J. S. Williams, '82; A. W. Lublin, '84; H. 
Howell and B. Tekirian, '85; W. A. Eaton, '86; A. 
H. Sawyer, '91 ; A. T. Beals. '92; W. L. Morse, 
'95; Dr. A. T. Hull, '00; C. S. Rice, '01 ; J. F. 
Lyman. '05; F. A. Cutter and J. H. Walker, '07; 
T. A. Barry, 0. L. Clark and W. J. Coleman, '08. 
Mr. Merrill, guest of Dr. Washburn. 

Of the many letters of regret received from invited 
guests we name but a few as follows : Secretary 
George B. Cortelyou ; Governor Curtis Guild, Jr.; 
Secretary George H. Martin of the Massachusetts 
Board of Education; Carroll D. Wright, President 
Clark College; Brigadier-Generals Abner H. Merrill 
and Charles Morris and Major Victor H. Bridgman. 
We print the following telegram from a very much 
loved man \ " Hearty congratulations and best 
wishes to my old pupils and friends. Regret I can- 
not be with you. C. A. Goessmann." 

Post- Prandial: Mr. Lyman called the club to 
order and introduced Mr. J. F. Barrett, 75. On 
taking the chair, the toastmaster in a brief intro- 
ductory address said that the only reason why he 
acted as toastmaster was the unusual modesty of the 
President of the Club, for Mr. Lyman was even In 
these effete days of New England agriculture, oper- 



84 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



atlng successfully a farm of a thousand acres in 
Connecticut, and can be well cited as a type of the 
best product of the teaching of our Alma Mater. It 
was a matter of regret to all that President Butter- 
field's duty on the National Rural Commission pre- 
vented his attendance tonight. (The speakers were 
then introduced In the following order :) 

Dean Mills: My experience In the past has 
taught me to expect great pleasure in meeting the 
New York Alumni Association of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. I have always found here a 
heartiness of welcome, and warmth of kindly feeling, 
which cannot be forgotten. I am reminded at this 
moment that at the last time I met with you, Presi- 
dent Goodell was also present and I trust you will 
pardon this personal reference to him. In the suc- 
cesses of the present and In our hopes for the future, 
we sometimes forget those who have made the 
present and the future possible by their effort. I was 
in a position to know somewhat intimately the anx- 
ieties that President Goodell felt for the College, and 
the burdens which he bore in its service. Not the 
least of the fruit of his effort was the fact that the 
people of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts had 
grown to have confidence in the College and its 
mission. It had not always been so. The early 
years were characterized by a lack of confidence on 
the part of those who might be expected to be 
interested In the work that the College was under- 
taking; but during the administration of President 
Goodell, confidence in the College was greatly in- 
creased. We. in a measure, are entering into the 
results of his labors, and 1 could not refrain on this 
occasion from placing another wreath of affectionate 
regard upon his grave. But you wish to know about 
the present and It is hardly necessary for me to say 
that the present is full of promise for the future. You 
know the breadth of purpose and the skill In organiza- 
tion which are characterizing President Butterfield's 
work. At the College, activity is showing itself all 
along the line; and those of us who are working with 
the President are finding that we, at least have 
enough to do to meet his laudable and ambitious 
requirements. There are at present 260 under- 
graduate students attending the College — the largest 
number In its history. The Freshman Class numbers 
117. There are thirty instructors giving their time 



and effort to the work of the College; and 1 am 
happy to say that the work with the students is 
marked by that spirit of co-operation which always 
characterizes successful work in education. Increased 
attention is being given to the relations between 
Faculty and students. President Butterfield has 
introduced the weekly Assemblies, giving opportunity 
for distinguished and instructive speakers to address 
the student body. At the Vesper Service on Sunday 
afternoons, interesting preachers are secured, largely 
in the interests of the Y. M. C. A., which is exerting 
a helpful and healthful influence in the College. If 
you could be transported to Amherst at this moment. 
I presume you would find the ladies of the Faculty 
and a large part of the student body, enjoying a 
reception in the Gymnasium, thoughtfully planned- 
and 1 doubt not wisely executed— in securing that 
social influence for the students which the ladies of 
the Faculty are anxious to exert. These are a few of 
the indications of that healthful and promising condi- 
tion of things, which we find at the College today. 
There is a constant study of the various phases of 
education which present themselves ir. connection 
with the work of the College. It is holding to the 
idea that there should be some time given to the 
cultural snbjects, as well as to the vocational subjects. 
The first two years of the course, particularly, are 
designed to give the students a breadth of view which 
they might lose, if the work of the College was purely 
vocational. We are living in a time when there is a 
variety of opinion respecting the legitimate work of a 
College. We hear about cultural subjects and voca- 
tional subjects— about industrial training,— the college 
of discipline, and the college of freedom. Whatever 
may be our individual opinions. 1 think we must 
accept the following statement made by the dis- 
tinguished educator whose work, as President of 
Harvard University, Is well known : President Eliot 
says "These six 1 believe to be essential constituents 
of education in the highest sense : We must learn to 
see straight and clear; to compare and infer; to make 
an accurate record; to remember; to express our 
thought with precision; and to hold fast to lofty 
Ideals." It makes little difference by what name 
your institution is called, if only it secures for its 
students these " essential constituents of education. 
At this time particularly, we need to train men of 



breadth. The rural problem calls for leaders, and, 
other things being equal, the best leader is the man of 
greatest breadth. There has never been a time when 
the demands of citizenship were higher than they are 
at present. Our College, receiving as it does sub- 
stantial help from the Government of the United 
States, and from the State of Massachusetts, must 
make some adequate return in the quality of citizen- 
ship which may be produced at the College. In the 
words of another, the aim of the College is " to make 
men who can do things." We must first make the 
man and after that the doer. In this way, we can 
best discharge the duty that we owe to the Govern- 
ment and the State, and hope to produce, as the 
result of training at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, men worthy of the State, and who shall bring 
honor to the great Republic. 

{To be Continued.] 



their work and emphasizing the fact that during the 
New Year we should resolv- never to be discouraged. 
"If we believe in Gcd and a Divine Savior we ought 
never to be discouraged. God promises that his 
grace will be continually with us. He promises to 
give us a new heart." 

A large share of the audience was made up of 
members of the short course. The association 
wishes to extend a most cordial welcome to the new 
men. at all its mid-week meetings as well as to the 
Sunday Vespers. 



Dtp&r-tmtrvf Notts. 



Y- M. C- A. |\lo-tes. 



At the beginning of the New Year the word 
"Opportunity" faces the college association. An 
opportunity for service, another chance to measure 
up to our noblest ideals. 

In the fall we had great visions of successful 
endeavors, soon places of weakness were clearly seen, 
opportunities for greatly increased effectiveness opened 
before us. Unexpected difficulties arose ; results did 
not come so rapidly as we had hoped, and the tempta- 
tion was more frequent than we cared to acknowledge 
to allow the hum-drum of daily study and the "petty 
round" of details to blind the high ideals which gov- 
ern our best selves. But however far we have failed 
in our hopes of the past with the opening of the New 
Year, lets us cooperate in winning the greatest battle 
of life. The battle with the human soul. 

"Even though we may not be able now to mount 
up on wings as eagles, or to run and not be weary we 
can force ourselves to walk and not faint. " 

The first meeting of the year ninteen-nine was con- 
ducted by Dean Ceorge F, Mills, who gave words of 
encouragement, and advise in a very forceful way. 
After clearly explaining the significance of the term 
"Happy New Year" the Dean told how prone people 
were to he discouraged either with themselves or 



Three M. A. C. names apnear on the program of 
lectures just issued by the Massachusetts Horticultural 
society. Trustee William H. Bowker will lecture 
Jan. 9, on "The Yeast of the Soil." On Jan. 23, 
the speaker will be Professor White, subject, 
"Ornamental Gardens and Garden Materials." Pro- 
fessor Waugh will lecture Feb. 20, on "American 
Landscape Architecture." 

A new book by Prof. F. A. Waugh entitled "The 
American Apple Orchard" has just been published by 
the Orange Judd Company of New York. It is a 
substantial cloth bound volume of 215 pages, amply 
illustrated. It is designed to be a practical manual 
of modern orchard practice with reference to the 
growing of apples. 

Professor Waugh has recently returned from an 
extensive western trip, having visited North Adams, 
Cleveland, O., Chicago and the University of Illinois 
at Champaign. At various points investigations were 
made in lines of landscape architecture, especially In 
Chicago, where high class work is being done. At 
Chicago, Professor Waugh attended the meeting of 
the western alumni association of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural college. At the University of Illinois he 
gave a short course of lectures on horticultural topics. 
The Veterinary Department has recently received 
a gift of 16 volumes of medical works and numerous 
histological specimens from Dr. George W. Rawson 
of Amherst. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT AND ANIMAL 

CHEMISTRY. 
John R. Bodurtha. whd for the last year has been 
employed in this department as a tester of pure bred 



86 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



87 



jersey and Guernsey stock, has resigned In order to 
accept a more lucrative position with the Corn 
Products Company of New York. ________ 



Alumni. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The annual dinner ot the Massachusetts Agricultu 
ral College Alumni Club of Massachusetts will I be 
held at the Parker House, Boston, on Jan. 29 with 
reception at six, and dinner at seven. The principal 
speaker of the evening will be President Butterf.eld 
who will speak on his experiences as a member of 
the Country Commission. 

The regular annual meeting and banquet of the 

Western Alumni Association of M. A. C. met at the 

Union League Club. Chicago on the evening of Dec. 

9 A goodly number of graduates were present. 

Professor Waugh gave a lengthy and interesting 



.93 _H F. Staples of Cleveland. O.. has been 
appointed Chairman of the Bureau of Sanitary 
Science and Public Health in the American Institute 
of Homeopathy. 

.94 _a H. Kirkland has resigned his position as 
Superintendent of the Gypsy Moth Commission owing 

to Illness. 

•94 -Ralph E. Smith, Associate Professor of 
Plant Pathology at the University of California. is the 
author of a new bulletin entitled "Gum Disease of 
Citrus Trees in California." 

' 95 _Prof. R. A. Cooley, of Bozeman, Mont., 
Professor of Zoology and Entomology at the Montana 
Agricultural College was visiting College during the 

holidays. Mm ,_. 

.97 _L F Clark, who Is engaged In creamery 
work in Des Moines, la., visited College last week. 

.99 _The recent order of the Secretary of 



Professor Waugh gave a lengthy and > ntere *"^ L ulH Lleut . William H. Armstrong, U. S. A ,. to 
account of the work being carried on at the college * t the Fort Lea venworth school for officers 

which was received with much enthusiasm. 



wnicn was ic^i"-" " — , 

voted to hold the next meeting at the same time and 
place, and to continue the Western Alumni prize for 
a period of f.ve years. The following officers were 
elected: A. B. Smith, president; P. C. Brooks 
vice-president; M. H. West, secretary and treasurer ; | 
trustees. W. E. Stone, 82, L. A. Nichols, 71 H. 
J. Armstrong. '97, J.T. Wilder, '82. George M.les, 

•75, C. B. Smith, '95. 

Dr H T Fernald who has just returned from the 
meetings of the affiliated societies held in Baltimore 
during the holidays, reports that over twenty M. A. C. 
alumni were present at the meetings. A. F. Bur- 
aess '94 of Washington was re-elected secretary- 
treasurer of the American Association of Economic 
Entomologists. J. N. Summers, '07, W. S. Regan 
FA Johnson and W. F. Turner. '08, were elected 
members of the Entomological Society of America 
W. F. Turner was also elected a member of the 
Association of Economic Entomologists. 

- 86 _Dr G. E. Stone attended the meetings of 
the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science and of the Botanical Society, held in Balti- 
more during the holidays. Dr.Stone also attended a 
meeting of seedsmen held in Washington. 

•89.— C. S. Crocker is recovering from a severe 
attack of pneumonia. 



has been revoked. Lieutenant Armstrong was 

recommended as Engineer Officer to make a new 

survey and map of Porto Rico. The work was begun 

in July, 1908. and is still in progress. Address, 

j Box 99, San Juan. P. R. 

-00— J E Hailigan of the Louisiana Experiment 
Station has recently installed some new laboratory 
apparatus. He is the author of a very thorough bul- 
letin recently issued by the Louisiana Experiment 
Station entitled "CommercialFeeding Stuffs. The 
bulletin is a very laborious work, being the result of 
over 8.000 analyses, representing 200,000 tons of 

^'Ol -AC. Wilson has changed his address from 
15 Second St.. San Francisco to Room 1021, First 
National Bank Building. San Francisco, Cal. 

'02 —Arthur L. Dacy has been appointed assistant 
horticulturist In the West Virginia Experiment 

' '02.— R. W. Morse has started a publishing busi- 
ness In Fall River. 

•03 — W E Tottlngham of Madison, Wis., nas 
recently been visiting H. J. Franklin at St. Paul. 

Minn. 

•04.-Married, Friday. Dec. 25. Sidney B. Has- 
kell and Florence Lillian Dacy. 



'04.— Arthur W. Gilbert has been appointed fel- 
low in agriculture In Cornell University and will do 
work in plant breeding lines. 

'05.— Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hatch of Torring- 
ton. Conn., spent Christmas in Amherst. 

'05.— Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Henshaw visited col- 
lege last week. Mr. Henshaw has spent the last 
three summers in Alaska on U. S. Geological work. 

'05.— Born. Dec. 14, 1908. to Mr. and Mrs. 
LewellS. Walker, a son, Lewell Seth Walker. Jr.. 
the 1905 class boy. 

'05. — C. S. Holcomb is studying at the Currie 
School for Expression, Boston. 

'06.— E. F. Gaskill has been elected Master of the 
Amherst Grange. 

'06.— H. M. Russell, U. S. Department of Agri 
culture, Washington, D. C. 

*07.— J. H. Walker, City Forester, Newark, N. J. 

'07.— C. M. Parker of Stratham, N. H. will 
spend the winter at Dunedin, Fla. Since leaving 
college he has succeeded in placing a run-down farm 
in good condition for successful operation. 



'07.— Arthur H. Armstrong died Sunday, Dec. 20, 
at his home in West Gardner. 

'07.— Married, Dec. 22. J,hn T. Caruthers and 
Annie Pauline Greene. 

'07.— H. P. Wood of Dallas, Tex., who has been 
spending his vacation at home, visited college recently. 

'08.— H. E. Alley has gone to California, where 
he will be engaged in pathological experiment work 
for the University of California on the Spreckels 
Sugar Co. ranch. 

'08.— Loyd Chapman attended the Informal held 
Dec. 12. 

'08. — J. A. Hyslop has been quite ill. 

•08.— Owing to the fact that the Marlboro Stock 
farm has done away with its poultry department, S.J. 
Wright has severed his connections with that'com- 
pany. He has been spending a few weeks in Amherst 
and expects to go to Chapinville, Conn,, as dairyman 
on Grassland Farms under C. S. Phelps, '85 
superintendent. 

'08. — C. C. Gowdyis now assisting H. A. Ballou 
in the office of the Government Entomologist of the 
British West Indies. 



DEUEVS J3RUO STORED 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 

3 ft. by 6 ft., - - . $4.00 

Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



IXEMXE^'S ORUO STOKER 



88 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




Sprint and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAILOK »TOI**£ 
II AMITY STREET, - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4- 



C & K DERBY (Quality dc Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOKEW 

CAMPION, 

TAIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 
TA,U AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabar's 3ntn 

a u-i„ NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Ol.t South Street, ofl Main, • *"»» »« 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

When in " Harap." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLAC BTOmNiT N THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



ISTK K.CO LI .KO.ATK BUREAU OF ACADEMIC COSTUME 

colics* CWUSL^HS? 
C0TREIJl7& LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



It's Your Next at the 

Mist House MR SHop 

Four First Class Barbers 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 

GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 



Open Mondays from ; 


J A. M. tO 8 P. M 


Tuesdays ) 


, «« 6 " 


Wednesdays, ; 


r » 8 •• 


Thursdays, 1 


1 « 6 " 


Fridays, 


. » 8 " 


Saturdays, 


, •« u " 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Kxcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRANO FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 9i% Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 




"For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 



tie BOE-winm cony. 



24-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



Fancy Crackers, 



Confectionery and Fruit, 



WRIGHT £ DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dealers in Higb Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 





ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It b generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRKJHT & DITSON 
have the best looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 



The WRIUHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rra 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIGHT dfe DITSOX 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

18 WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 



SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

*£• A. TIIOMPHOIV, 

Rear First National Bank, AMHERST 



Caps arid Goicns 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth Ay* , Nkw York. 





I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GoiinBGtiGut valley Street Railway Go. 

AMIIEHHT DIVISION. 

l jBnB»«9WiBfi , BasrBwa 

"Don'tWalk on your Heels 

To ...^ your MM, Con.e !•»• >or your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Oppositb Tow n Hall. ^ 

iSSsiWiwiiiwtt 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Aml.er>t. 



ft. 



1909" COLLEGE MEN 

SHOULD CONSIDER THESE FACTS 

Pennsylvania is rapidly becoming the foremost High 
School State in the Union. Pennsylvania gives College 
Graduates life certificates of the highest grade after they 

tunities for more in Pennsylvania and other States. 
THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 
R. L. Myers & Co. 
,oi Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
I54 S Glenarm St., Denver, Colo. 
12-16 Trinity Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 



DEflTAU flOOMS, 

AMHERST, MASS 
CUTLER'S BLOCK. "" 



ftral Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1908. 



E. H. DICKINSON, D. H. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

„ AMHERST, MASS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - - - *■«■■» . 

OFFICE HOOKS : 

e to ia a- »*-. i-3o TO 6 *•- **- 
Ether and Nitrons Oxkle Ga. administered whsn desired 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m , 
express, and 5.88 p. m. The 5.38 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 

6.20 P. m. 

Weekdays only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J J. W. HANLEY, 

General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 



REMOVED 



From over Amherst Bakery to rear of Henry F.she ■ two 
blocks down. Will be open and ready to do Cleans, ng 
Pressing, Altering, also cleansing of neckt.es, kid g oves, 
I etc LcSok up my ticket system for M. A. C- students. 

GERARD N. LEW, 

Ex. M. A. C, ii. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

•27 Main St Northampton 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day. 
Lunches. Confectionery, Cigars Noted for Its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowiler. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYIVTOIV, 

MANUFACTUKKH OF 

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Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



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lias received the latent fabric* for the sprta* .,„) H un,.,.er 
trade of 07 in Gentlemen's Garments. AUso dose Ladles' 
Garments iu a satisfactory manner. 



Cleaning 



Altering, Repairing 
and Pressing promptly done. 

Military Work a Specialty .^Q4 
Under the Post Office, - . Amhkrst, Mass. 



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THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



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Everything New andUp to Date. 



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Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
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BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



AI.A.O. A K 't, 



C H.WKItll, •«>» 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

*>\ES?S.A.TiaF\A.CHri01Sr C»TJ.A.;R.A. I srTBEE>.«£?6 
H. A. VTLET, Maumger. 

OFFICE : 

East nesusazit Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE. 

The Children »re Hwppy. 

Because their clothes are made on the New Home >>k win. 
Machine which fact. a^ure* then, of no "rli "a." Mother- 
should ? et one at once as It will .lo f..r their children In ve»r» 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. y " 












THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



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CUT FLOWERS 



Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 




DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



102 Main St., 



Z~T: — ~ L. H. ToUBTKLOTTB. 

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ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLE-ALB DBALUS AMD JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an^ction of our Coolers and 

Corner North and Union Sis., Basement 3 UnionSt., 

BOSTON 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

U2 Main Street, - ■ Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 




The Largest Manufacturers In the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 



-"•» ."«"• NEAR EXPRES A S M HEk?T. «A» 

Telephone Connection, 



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,.. t i w-.nitfiHurers in the World 



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Order, UA at Amherst House Will **** Prompt Attention 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLBTB LINK OP GOODS 
SUITBD TO THB STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



ESTABLISHED 1881. 



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205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
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SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

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15 Fairs of Pants Pressed for fi.50. 

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CHARLES E. EWELL 



We handle the oe8t of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

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European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



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Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER «fc CO. 



A FULL LINE OF 



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College Stationery. 

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OFFERS 



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• i i.l 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 8 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 27. 1909 




We would like a share of your patronage, we are rehable ad wo know. 
All the boys get the habit of eoming to us when they know the town. We 
hi Custom a'nd Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Coth.ng, and ,» 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

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page's Sboe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




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VIOIilN, BRHJO, WRWDOlilN, GUITAR STRINGS. 

OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS VUA ^ 

'thurbers 

VARIETY STORE- 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



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There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in .7 years, has built up a market m 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
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proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 

best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 

branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

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AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 

COLLEGE~1sUPPLY STORE. 



Over too good barga.ns listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 27. 1909 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications thould be addressed. Coixaoa Siowal, Amhsrst. Mass. Thb Siomal will be 
sent to all subscribers until Ita discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BRICCS. 1909. Business Manager. 

W.R.CLARKE. 1910. Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON, 1 910. Assistant Business Manager 
R C POTTER. 1909. College Notes. L. C. BROWN. 1910, Athletic Notes. 

M. F. GEER, 1909, Alumni Notes. H. A. BROOKS 1910. Department Notea. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Y. M. C. A. Notes. A. H. SHARPE. 1911. 

E. M. BROWN. 1911. 



TvnMi $1.00 par gear la adeaw 


». Siagle Copts*, Ma. 


Postage outside of United States and 


Canada, Sac. extra. 


The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket- Ball Association, 
Bate- Ball Association. 


SIGNAL'S 

H. W. Turner, Pres. 
Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
R. H. Allen. Manager. 
R. C. Lmdblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 


DIRECTORY 

College Senate, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index 

Y. M. C- A. 

Musical Association 


O. C. Bsrtlett. President 
R. C. Lindblad. Pres. 
F. T. Haynes. Managei . 
C. H. White. Prea. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



Ed i-tb rials. 



Junior Prom., Feb. 12. R. A. Waldron, Chair- 
man. 



The day of reckoning is at hand. 



Erratum:— H. J. Moreau, '12. of Turners Falls, 
was not pledged to Theta Phi as announced in the 
last issue. 



The deficit of $4,685 quoted in the last issue of 
the Signal as being the total deficit of the college for 
the year Is only the total cash deficit of three or four 
departments. The total cash receipts (with cash on 
hand) were $145,972.77 while the total cash dis- 
bursements were $134,149.71. leaving a cash bal- 
ance of $11,823.06. 



While all are not working, as was expected, there 
have been turned into the office 385.8 inches or 
1929 words of "copy." Five reports of the Inter- 
class track meet were handed in. A portion of the 
best report is published. The names of the members 
of the Staff with credits awarded to date will be pub- 
lished in the next issue. 



Athletic Notts- 



The system of competition inaugurated by the 
Signal. Jan. 6, is surpassing expectations. The 
Staff of Reporters now numbers fourteen men. 



INTERCLASS TRACK MEET. 

The interclass track meet Saturday, Jan. 23, was 
run off smoothly in every respect. Four of the events 
were held at 2-30 p. m. on the track, the rest in the 
Drill Hall in the evening. The results of the meet 
together with the cross country run held last fall are : 
Juniors. 68; Seniors, 36; Freshmen, 26; Sopho- 
mores, 7. The officials were: judges, Gribben. 
Chapman, Summers ; timers. Regan, Whitmarsh, 
Jennlson; clerk, Dr. Reynolds; starter, Barry; 
announcer. Corbett. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



9« 



The 440-yard run had only six contestants, and 
these with the exception of S. C. Brooks, '10, were 
Seniors and Freshmen. The 1000-yard run was not 
contested by the Seniors and only one Sophomore 
took part. Prouty. '10, early took the lead and held 
it although Tower. '12, cut it down to one yard. 
The 600-yard run was perhaps the most spectacular. 
Pickard, '11, led for several rounds; then Harlow, 
'12, took the lead only to be passed 25-yards from the 
finish by Cowles, ' 10. The Sophomores did not enter 
a team in the relay race. 1909 had a 10-yard lead 
at the end of O'Grady's run but S. C. Brooks, 10, 
was at the heels of Turner, '09, on the second relay. 
Cloues MO, then led for a while, but Crossman, '09, 
recovered the lead which Warner, '09. was able to 
increase to 15 yards. 

The indoor events were contested sharply. 
O'Grady, '09, easily won the 25-yard dash. The 
Juniors came in, one.two, three on the potato race but 
Partridge was disqualified. The first heat of the 
obstacle race had to be run again with a modification 
of the rules. In the second heat, '09 and '12 were 
disqualified. The human obstacle and rescue races 
were the most amusing events. The senior contest- 
ants proved good tumblers. 

At the conclusion of the meet there was a boxing 
exhibition of two bouts, two rounds each— Cardin, 
'09 vs. Racicot, ' 1 1 , and Brandt, '10, vs. Sheehan, 
'12. 

The summary of the events : 

OUTDOOR EVENTS. 

440-yd. run. Won by Walker, '12; Cardin, '09, 
second; Wilson, '09, third. Time, 1 min. 3 1-5 sec. 

1000-yd. run. Won by Prouty, MO; Tower, M2, 
second; Barrows, Ml, third. Time, 2 min. 35 3-5 

sec 

600-yd. run. Won by Cowles, MO; Harlow, M2, 
second; Pickard, Ml; third. Time. 1 min., 29 

4-5 sec. 

Relay race. Won by '09(0 'Grady, Warner. Cross- 
man and Turner); MO, second (Damon. S.C.Brooks, 
Cloues, and Dickinson) ; M2, third, (Beers, Walker, 
Williams and Clapp. Time, 3 min. 25 2-5 sec. 



INDOOR EVENTS. 

25-yd. dash. First Heat. Won by Damon, MO ; 



Hathaway, '09. second. Time, 3 4-5 sec. Second 
Heat. Won by O'Grady/09 ; S.C.Brooks,MO,second. 
Time. 3 4-5 sec. Third Heat. Won by Dickinson, 
'10, Crossman, '09, second. Time, 4 1-5 sec. 
Fourth Heat. Won by Hill. Ml; Everson, MO, 
second. Time, 4 1-5 sec. Semi-final (Hathaway, 
'09, Brooks, MO, Crossman, '09, and Everson, MO). 
Won by Hathaway. Time, 4 sec. Final Heat 
(Damon, MO. O'Grady. '09, Dickinson, MO, Hill. 
'11 Hathaway. '09). Won by O'Grady, '09; 
Damon, MO, second; Hathaway. '09. third. Time, 

3 3-5 sec. 

Potato Race. First Heat. Won by Prouty, MO. 
Time 38 4-5 sec. Second Heat. Won by Par- 
tridge, MO. Time, 37 3-5sec. Third Heat. Won 
by Nickless, MO. Time, 41 sec. Fourth Heat. 
Won by Nickerson, Ml. Time, 37 1-5 sec. 

Final Heat. Won by Prouty, MO; Nickless. 

'10. second; Nickerson. Ml. third. Time, 

35 4-5 sec. 

Sack Race. Won by Hathaway, '09; Blaney, 
'10 second; Wilson, '09, third. Time, 9 1-5 sec. 
Obstacle Race. First Heat. Won by Johnson, 
'10- Brown. Ml, second. Time, 27 3-5 sec. Sec- 
ond' Heat. Won by Cloues, MO; Blaney, Ml, 
second. Time. 26 2-5 sec. Final Heat. Won by 
Cloues, MO; Johnson. MO, second; Blaney, Ml, 
third. Time, 27 1-5 sec. 

Running High Jump. Won by Turner, 09; 
Coules. MO and Schermerhorn, '10, tied for second 
place. Height, 5 ft. 

Rope Climb. First Heat. Won by Cardin, 09. 
Time 7 1-5 sec. Second Heat. Won by Nickless, 
'10. ' Time, 6 1-2 sec. Third Heat. Won by 
Bartlett. '09. Final Heat. Won by Nickless. MO; 
Cardin.' '09, second; Bartlett, '09, third. Time, 

5 4-5 sec. 

Human Burden Race. First heat, won by Juniors 
(Nickless and Cloues), Seniors (Crosby and Willis) 
second. Time, 15 3-5 sec. Second heat, won by 
Sophomores (Prouty and Drury), Freshmen (Clapp 
and Wales), second. Time, 16 1-5 sec. Final 
heat, won by Juniors, Freshmen second. Seniors 
third. Time, 15 sec. 

Human Rescue Race. First heat, won by Fresh- 
men (Walker and Dee). Juniors (Leonard and John- 
son), second. Time, 13 1-5 sec. Second heat, won 



by Freshmen (Merrill and Gray), Juniors (Schermer- 
horn and Holland), second. Time, 13 1-5 sec. 
Final heat, won by Juniors (Leonard and Johnson); 
Freshmen (Merrill and Gray), second; Freshmen 
(Walker and Dee), third, Time, 13 sec. 

SUMMARY OF POINTS. 



Event. 




•09 


•10 


•11 


'12 


440-yard Run 




4 






5 


1000-yard Run 






5 


1 


3 


600-yard Run 






5 


1 


3 


Relay Race 




10 


5 




3 


25-yard Dash 




6 


3 






Potato Race 






8 


1 




Sack Race 




6 


3 






Obstacle Race 






8 


1 




High Jump 




5 


4 






Rope climb 




4 


5 






Human Burden 


Race 


1 


5 




3 


Human Rescue 


Race 




5 




4 


Total 




36 


56 


4 


21 


Cross Country Run 




12 


3 


7 



Grand Total 36 68 7 28 

First place counts 5 points, second 3. and third 1. 
Relay race — first place counts 10 points, second 5, and 

third 3. 
Cross-Country Run — first place counts 12 points, second 7 

and third 3. 



BASKETBALL. 

Williams, 41 ; M. A. C, 2. 

Our basketball team was severely defeated at Wil- 
liamstown on Wednesday, Jan. 13. Williams com- 
pletely outclassed us, keeping the play almost entirely 
in our territory throughout the game, and tossing 
baskets almost at will. They totalled 23 points in the 
first half, and 18 more in the second. Our shots at 
the basket were few, due to the close guarding of the 
opponents, and consequently our only points came 
from two fouls thrown by Captain Burke. Lewis and 
Templeton did most of the scoring for Williams. 

The line-up: — 
Williams. 
Lewis. I. f. 
Lambie. r. f. 
Horrax. Westbrook. c. 
Templeton. 1. g. 
Oakley, Wallace, r. g. 

Score— Williams 41, M. A. 
Lewis 6, Lambie. Horrax 4 



m. a. c. 

r. g., Neale 

1. g., Hosmer 

d Oppel, Schermerhorn 

r. f., Pearson 

1. f.. Burke 

C. 2. Goals from floor— 

Westbrook, Templeton 5. 



Oakley. Wallace. Coals from fouls— Templeton 3. Burke 2. 

Referee— Lynch of North Adams. Time 20-minute halves. 

Holy Cross, 36; M. A. C, 16. 

The basketball team was defeated on Saturday, 
Jan. 16. The beginning of the game was fast and 
speedy, some clever passing being done by our team. 
Holy Cross then took a bracer and began to get 
baskets, O'Connor, center for Holy Cross, getting five 
baskets In rapid succession. Captain Burke played 
an especially good game getting seven points out of 
the sixteen. Captain Casey of Holy Cross was good 
in blocking and passing. He also got six baskets. 
Many fouls were called on both sides for holding, and 
for two men playing on one. Otherwise the game 
was clean and fast. 

The line-up : — 

Holy Cross. m . a . c , 

J°y- '• f- r. g.. Pearson 

Daly. Larkin. r. f. 1. g, (Capt.) Burke 

O'Connor, c. c .. Schermerhorn 

Casey (Capt.). 1. g. r . f. Neale 

Reynolds, r. g. |. f., Hosmer 

Score— Holy Cross 36. M. A. C. 16. Coals from floor, 
Joy 3, Casey 6. O'Connor 5. Reynolds. Daly, Neale 2. 
Schermerhorn, Burke 3. Goals from fouls— Joy 4. Burke 3. 
Schermerhorn 3. Referee— P. W. Hehir of Worcester. 
Time — 20-minute halves. 

1912. 17; Amherst H. S.. 1 1. 

The Freshman basketball team defeated Amherst 
High in the drill hall in a preliminary game. Jan. 22. 
The game was fast and interesting. The team 
work of the Freshmen was excellent. Their passes 
were run off well. Muller and Gray were the best 
scorers for the Freshmen, while Mullein and Living- 
ston excelled for the High School. 

The summary : — 
Freshmen. Amherst High. 

C. A. Smith. I. f. r. g., Livingston 

Gray, r. f. l. g ., McCarty 

Muller, c. c . Smith 

Covill. r. g. l. f., palmer 

Moreau. Merrill. 1. g. r . f., Mullein 

Score— Freshmen 17, Amherst High II. Baskets thrown 
by— Muller 3. Gray 3, Smith 2. Livingston 2, Mullein 2. 
Palmer. Fouls— Palmer, Smith. Referee— Regan. Time- 
keeper — Turner. Scorer— Brown. Time— 15-minute halves. 
S. T. S.,29; M. A. C, 10. 

In a fast game Friday. Jan. 22, at the Drill Hall, 
Springfield Training School defeated our team by a 




I 



92 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



score of 29—19. The visitors excelled in passing and 
general team work, and steadily increased the slight 
lead which they got early in the game. The first halt 
ended with the score 15— 9 in their favor. Their 
guards were shifted for the second halt, and Anderson 
replaced Schnurr. Messer was more than half of 
the visiMng team, making eight points on goals, and 
seven on free tries. 

For M. A. C, Pearson, Capt. Burke, and, for the 
few minutes he was In, Moreau, showed up well. The 
team work was poor, the men preferring to make 
chance shots at the basket rather than to pass. The 
passes that they did make were often intercepted by 
opponents. Taken as a whole, however, the speed 
of our team has increased somewhat since the last 



game. 

The line up : 

S. T. S. 
Wright, Messer, 1. g. 
Messer. Wright, r. g. 
Winter, c. 
McCullock. 1. f. 
Schnurr, Anderson, r. f 

Score-S. T. S. 29 ; 
McCulloch 3. Schnurr 
Mcreau2. Burke I. Oppel 1, Hosmer 1. Neale 1. Goals 
from fouls— Messer 7. Burke 3, Referee— Keough. Am- 
herst. Umpire. Briggs, Springfield. Timer— Turner. M. A. C. 



M. A. C 

r. f. Pearson. Moreau 

1. f. Burke 

c. Oppel. Schermerhorn 

r. g. Hosmer 

1. g. Neale 

M. A. C. 19. Goals: Messer 4, 

1. Winter 2. Wright 1, Pearson 2. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Jan. 27— Assembly 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, 
Thomas VanNess. Subject. Tolstoi. 
Ice Hockey, M. A. C. vs. S. T. S. at 
Springfield. 
Jan. 28— Y. M. C. A. 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 

Debating Club 7-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
Business Meeting and Program. 
Speaker, Dean Mills. 
Jan. 29— Senior Minstrel Show, New Braintree. 
Jan. 30— Ice Hockey 3-00 p. m., M. A. C. vs. 
Amherst, Pratt Rink. 
Union Entertainment 6-30 p. m. In Chapel. 
Speaker, Frederick W. Bancroft. Jr. 
Basketball, M. A. C. vs. Dartmouth at 
Hanover. N. H. 
Jan. 31 -Feb. 5— Final Exams. 
Feb. 5— Ice Hockey. 3-00 p. m.. 

I. T. at Amherst. 
Feb. 9— Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p. m. Agricultural 

Room. 
Feb. 10— Assembly 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, 
Prof. W. T. Sedgwick. M. I. T. 



M. A. C. vs. M. 



(olleg? Not- 



ice HOCKEY SCHEDULE. 

Manager R. C. Potter has arranged the following 
schedule for the hockey team : — 
Saturday, Jan. 23— Williams at Williamstown. 
Tuesday. Jan. 26— Cornell at Ithaca. 
Wednesday, Jan. 27— Springfield Training School at 

Springfield. 
Saturday. Jan. 30— Amherst at Amherst. 
Friday, Feb. 5— M. I. T. at Amherst. 
Saturday, Feb. 6 and 13— Class games. 
Saturday, Feb. 20— Open. 
Saturday. Feb. 27— Trinity at Amherst. 

These games are subject to cancellation because 
of poor ice. 



At a recent meeting of the short course students, 
the following officers were chosen: President, C. W. 
Tompson of Attleboro ; secretary and treasurer, E. 
M. F. Perrin of Potsdam, N. Y. 



The athletic board has recognized hockey as a reg- 
ular athletic sport and a letter will be awarded. 

Prof. W. R. Hart addressed the Grange at Peter- 
sham. Tuesday, Jan. 19, on Agricultural Education. 
On account of the storm, Rev. C. W. Merriam of 
Greenfield was not able to address the Vesper ser- 
vices, Sunday, Jan. 17. 

Dean Mills attended the Conference of New Eng- 
land Colleges on Entrance Requirements in English 
in Boston. Jan. 15 and 16. 

The Assembly speaker, Jan. 20. was Prof. Geo. 
B. Churchill of Amherst College. Edgar Allan Poe 
was the subject of his address. 

Vespers, Jan. 10, was conducted by Rev. A. P. 
Reccord of Springfield, who gave an able address on 
"The Religion of an Evolutionist." 

A mass-meeting was held before Assembly, Jan. 
20, in the interests of tennis. It was announced that 
the Athletic Board had voted to recognize tennis as 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




93 



an athletic sport. A. F. Rockwood, '10, was elected 
captain and F. L. Thomas, '10, manager. 

Professor Waugh spoke before the Farmers' 
Mechanic club at Holden, Wednesday, Jan. 20. 
His subject was in regard to recent changes in the 
methods of fruit growing. 

The following men will make the B. A. A. trip next 
month : Captain Turner, Warner, Crossman. 
Cloues, Dickinson, O'Grady and Dudley. Turner 
will enter the 600 yard run, Dudley, Warner and 
Crossman the 40 yard dash. The relay team is not 
yet picked. 

At a meeting of the Stockbridge club, Tuesday 
evening, Jan. 12, it was voted that such short course 
men as desire be allowed to become members of that 
organization and enjoy all its privileges, during their 
connection with the coikge. An excellent schedule 
of speakers is being prepared by Professors Waugh 
and Foord. 

President Butterfield went to Boston on Monday, 
Jan. 18, to deliver the opening address at a two days' 
meeting of the New England Country Church Asso- 
ciation. On Tuesday he attended a meeting of the 
board of trustees of the college. Wednesday he had 
a hearing before the agricultural committee and 
Wednesday noon was present at a meeting of the 
board of trustees on grounds. 

Prof. F. C. Sears lectured before the Stockbridge 
club Tuesday evening. Jan. 19, on Fruit Growing In 
Nova Scotia. The lecture was illustrated by many 
excellent slides and was highly instructive and inter- 
esting. Professor Sears was director of the Nova 
Scotia School of Horticulture at Wolfich for six 
years and Professor of Horticulture at the Nova 
Scotia Agricultural college for two years and is con- 
sequently well acquainted with the subject. 

At a meeting of the Debating club, Tuesday, Jan. 
12. the following program committee was elected: 
H. W. French, '10.H. L.White, '09, and H.W.Turner, 
'09. The meetings of the club will be held weekly 
on Thursday evening after the Y. M. C. A. meeting 
at 7-45 o'clock. A business meeting was held in the 
Chapel, Thursday evening, Jan. 21. New members 
were admitted, dues levied, and an article was added 
to the constitution. President Butterfield, Dean 
Mills and Prof. R. W. Neal were elected honorary 



members. A general discussion followed. The 
topic was: — Resolved, That attendance upon chapel 
exercises should not be compulsory. Lively argu- 
ments were made on both sides. A formal debate 
will be held on the topic later. Thursday. Jan. 28, 
Dean Mills will address the club. 

Representative F. A. Hosmer of Amherst was 
before the Committee of Agriculture on Friday, Jan. 
15, in behalf of a reimbursement to cover the loss of 
the model barn which was burned in August. He 
asked for $12,000 for a building for feed storage. 
$5,000 for a place for young stock, $3,000 for a 
farm tool-shed two stories high with a room for 
Instructions in farm mechanics, and $10,000 to 
replace the machinery, tools and implements 
destroyed by the fire. On Tuesday, Jan. 19, he 
presented a petition to the legislature in behalf of the 
State Board of Agriculture for an appropriation of 
$171,105 for the college, to be expended as follows: 
$13,605 for teaching and office equipment, $40,000 
for repairs and improvement of buildings including 
extension of the heating plant, $l5,000foran athletic 
field, $80,000 for a fireproof building for the depart- 
ment of Zoology and Entomology, $2,500 for a farm 
house, $3,000 for a fruit storage house, $3,000 for 
an instruction building in poultry husbandry, $8,000 
for a livestock pavilion and $6,000 for a house for 
the head of the Division of Horticulture. 



SENIOR MINSTREL SHOW. 

The Senior Minstrel Show was given in Amherst 
Town Hall, Friday evening, Jan. 15. An appreciative 
audience filled the hall to the doors, seventy-five 
standing room tickets being sold. 

The program included an overture by Wallace's 
orchestra of Northampton ; chorus singing with G. M. 
Brown as soloist, ballad singing by P. E. Alger of 
Reading, W. D. Barlow of Amherst. W. H. Coash 
of Lawrence, A. C. Brett of North Abington.J. F. 
Adams of Melrose. P. W. Allen of Westfield, L. S. 
Corbett of Jamaica Plains, and F. E. Thurston of 
Worcester ; and the finale introducing the tableau, 
"Columbia." 

P. E. Alger made a hit in singing "Jungle Town" 
and introducing his sprightly baboon, T. C. Young, 
'12. J. F. Adams' version of "You're in the Right 
Church but in the Wrong Pew" was well applauded. 



,. 

















"! 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




The feature of the performance came with L. S. 
Corbett's topical song in which members of the 
faculty and some townspeople were the topics. The 
Grand Finale was especially good, introducing a na- 
tional tableau entitled, " Columbia." 

The interlocutor was G. F. Sexton of Worcester. 
The end men, L. S. Corbett. J. F. Adams, and W. 
F Hennesy of Dorchester played the tambourines, 
and W H. Coash, P E. Alger and R. G. Fulton of 
Lynn, the bones. The circle included G. W. Brown 
of Cambridge, D. J. Caffrey of Gardner, G^ M. 
Codding of Taunton; H. P. Crosby of Lenox, S. 5. 
Grossman of Needham.A. W. Hubbard of Sunder- 
land G. E. MacGownof North Yarmouth, Me., H. G. 
Noble of Springfield, J. Noyes of Roslindale, H. W. 
Turner of Cuba, C. H. White of Providence, R. 1., 
L G Willis of Melrose Highlands, F. H. Wilson of 
Nahant F. F. Prouty of Worcester, H. H. Howe of 
Springfield and G. W. Nickerson of Amherst. The 
committee in charge was , R. C. Potter, chairman, 
H J Neale, H. G. Noble. The stage manager 
was F. C. Warner, and D. A. Martin of Northampton 

general director. 

After the Intermission specialties were Introduced 
in the form of-Song by D. A. Martin. Banjo Solo, 
Club Swinging, and a Plantation Scene including 
Solo and Quartette, and Buck and Wing. Dancing 
followed the entertainment. 



Webb, R. H. Allen, R. P. Armstron, J. C. Bailey, 
J P Blaney, H. A. Brooks, L. C. Brown, L. 
Brandt, W. R. Clarke. W. A. Cloues, E. F. Damon, 
L S. Dickinson, J. N. Everson. R. S. Edoy, F. T. 
Haynes, W. E. Leonard. L. S. McLaine, F. P. 
Nickless, F. A. Prouty. L. Rockwood, W. M. S. 
Titus, E. H. Turner, R. A. Waldron. C. A. Lodge. 
E A Larrabee, H. B.Morse, F. A. McLaughl.n, L. 
I Stevenson, R. S. Whitney, W. J. Blrdsall, J. Car- 
penter. J. T. Flnnegan, E. M. Folger, W. E. Phil- 
brick H. C. Walker. E. I. Wilde, J. E. Thompson. 



INFORMAL. 

The third and best of this year's Informals was held 
in the Drill Hall on Saturday, Jan. 1 6, and was very 
well attended. The hall was prettily decorated with 
festoons of red and white bunting draped from the 
beams to the walls, and evergreen hung along the bal- 
cony and over the windows. Potted plants filled the 
corners and were banked around the stage very effec- 
tively Derrick's Westfield Orchestra furnished the 
music. Mrs. K. L. Butterfield, Mrs. J. B. Paige, 
Mrs. Orcutt from Smith and Miss Lyon from Mt. 
Hotyoke acted as patronesses. 

Those in attendance were : P. E. Smith, G. H. 
Chapman. H. M. Jennison, W. S. Regan, J. R. 
Parker R. Whitmarsh, W. D. Barlow, S. S. Cross- 
man G. M. Codding. A. W. Hubbard, P. P. Car- 
din, G. R. Fulton, W. L. Ide, H. D. Phelps, R. C. 
Potter, H. W. Turner. M. W. Thompson, C. R. 



FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE. 

Saturday, Jan. 30. 8-30 a. m. 

Condition examination in Senior Bacteriology. 

Monday, Feb. 1., 8-15 a. m. 

Senior — Government. 
Junior— Botany, Mathematics. 

Sophomore— Zoology. 
1-30 p m.— Senior and Junior registration. 
Freshman— Agriculture. 

Tuesday, Feb. 2., 8-15 a. m. 
Senior and Junior-Landscape Gardening, Chemistry. 
Sophomore — Military. 

^rr-Sr-HonicuLure.Flor^uUu,.. 
Senior and Junior— Engineering. 
Junior— Agriculture. 
Sophomore — English . 

Wednesday, Feb. 3.. 8-15 a. m. 
Senior— English (Neale), Entomology. 
Junior— English (Neale). 
Sophomore— Physics. 
Freshman— Botany. 
1-30 p. m.— Senior— Veterinary, Mathematics. 

J unior — Economics. 

Sophomore and Freshman registration. 

Thursday. Feb. 4., 8-15 a. m. 
Senior-Psychology, Market Gardening, German. 
Junior— Military. 
Sophom ore — Chemistry . 
Freshman English. 

1-30 p. m.— Senior— Agriculture, Botany. 
Junior— Horticulture. 
Sophomore— Agriculture. 
Freshman— French, German. 

Friday. Feb. 5., 8-15 a. m. 
Senior— English (Mills). 
Junior— English (Mills). 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



95 



1-30 p. m. — Senior — Spanish, French. 
Junior— Zoology, Arboriculture. 
Sophomore— French. German. 

Arrangement must be made with instructor for any 
subject in which above schedule does not provide for 
examination. 

SCHEDULE FOR ENROLLMENT AND 

REGISTRATION. 

Monday. Feb. 1. 

1-30 p. m.— Cards issued to Seniors, Registrar's 

office. 
1-30 — 3-00. — Cards of Seniors presented to Treas- 
urer and Dean. 
3-00 P. m. — Cards issued to Juniors, Registrar's 

office. 
3-00 — 4-00. — Cards of Juniors presented to Treas- 
urer and Dean. 
Members of the Senior and Junior classes will 
enroll at the first scheduled exercise in each subject. 

Wednesday, Feb. 3. 
1-30 p. m. — Cards issued to Freshmen. Registrar's 

office. 
1-30 — 3-00. — Cards of Freshmen presented to 

Treasurer and Dean. 
3-00 p. m. — Cards issued to Sophomores, Registrar's 

office. 
3-00—4 00. — Cards of Sophomores presented to 

Treasurer and Dean. 

Friday, Feb. 5. 
9-00 a. m.— Freshman enrollment, Mathematical 

Building. 
10-30 a. m. — Sophomore enrollment. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REUNION 

of The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Club of New York, at Hotel St. Denis, 

Dec 4, 1908. 

[Continued] 

Professor Fernald, who has made the work 
of the College in entomology known all over the 
world, and who has recently been appointed director 
of the newly organized graduate school stated that 
graduate studies have been given for years, notably 
under Dr. Goessmann, and that the work has always 
been of a high character. He sketched the develop- 
ment of this and the demand for thoroughly trained 
men which has recently become so much greater 
than ever before. Speaking of the " Adams" Act of 
Congress, he stated that men proDerly trained to 
capably fill most of the positions established as the 



result of this Act were not being provided by the 
older non-agricultural institutions, and that many of 
the agricultural colleges were not prepared to under- 
take such work. On the other hand, the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College is unusually well pre- 
pared for just this grade of instruction, both by its 
facilities and location. Recently the demand for 
advanced training has become so great at the College 
as to make it evident that the establishment of a 
separate Graduate School, reorganizing the courses 
already existing, and co-ordinating them more effect- 
ively, followed by the addition of new courses, was a 
necessity, and accordingly the School has been 
established. Reorganization Is now under way, and 
a careful study of the methods adopted by such 
schools in all parts of the country is being made, 
many profitable points having already been gathered. 
The demand is for thoroughly trained men, and it is 
the purpose of the School to supply them. 

Professor Wellington: The most significant of 
President Eliot's six guides in education is, Lofty 
Ideals. I wish to say a few words about ideals in 
agricultural education. The future may look upon the 
present as the era of clubs, and this farmers' club is 
most heartily prized by all M. A. C. men. Another in 
Berlin, with club house on the Wilhelmstrasse, is open 
all the time in charge of the care-taker and his family ; 
is plainly, comfortably furnished and well supplied with 
agricultural literature; is a resort for the Intelligent 
farmers of the region. Its membership includes 
Princes of the royal blood, university professors, large 
farmers, farm superintendents and agricultural stu- 
dents. The Germans get down close to mother earth 
and receive largely from her their material, intellec- 
tual, and spiritual food. It is difficult to gain a clear 
conception of the present agricultural movement. The 
action of President Roosevelt in establishing the com- 
mission on country life was not for the purpose of 
offering charity to the farmers but to uplift the whole 
people into close sympathy with the noblest of all 
industries. Farming is the oldest occupation known to 
man and the latest to come into its own as a highly in 
tellectual occupation. Tne stunt of the farmer is to 
produce food and fibre from inorganic and waste 
organic material. The latter part of it is essentially a 
process of deoxidation and some of us believe that the 
I future will show how to do this without the expensive 






I I 



9 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



97 








service of plants and animals. We understand the 
mission of the M. A. C. to be that of a leader In 
agricultural education and as such she must very 
carefully choose her ideals ; she must take advantage 
of the work of the old college and then push forward 
and upward into the new knowledge on which is based 
modern practical life. The amount of enthusiasm and 
financial expenditure In the Western states In behalf 
of agricultural education is bewildering to the Eastern 
man The three latest buildings in Iowa Agricultural 
College cost one million dollars. In Wisconsin the 
courses of study and the great onrush in the agri- 
cultural college cause us to wonder and gaze awe- 
struck. We should copy their enthusiasm, their 
liberal expenditure and some of their methods ; for 
others we should look to Germany. England and 
France. As to the degrees of attainment to be 
reached by our four years' men. - If we look at the 
demands placed on our college we see the agricultural 
institutions of instruction, the experiment stations and 
the farms knocking continuously at our doors, asking 
for men to take highly responsible positions. The 
college could furnish a large number of such every 
year Of the class which graduated last June one 
man was offered as first year a salary of twenty-five 
hundred dollars; the offer was declined because he 
thought he could do better. Another man on the day 
of his graduation accepted a salary of eighteen hundred 
dollars The reason why we all believe an agri- 
cultural education to be the best, is, that the student 
Is compelled to see things grow, to learn how things 
grow and to imitate and study growing things. But 
agricultural education itself must grow. Liebig died 
in 1873. He and his co-workers revolutionized agri- 
culture by their achievements in chemistry. These 
came to be called agricultural chemistry and up to 
twenty-five years ago agriculture was not much beside 
what those men taught. Other sciences and arts in 
the succeeding years were organized and strengthened 
and in a measure caught up with agricultural chemis- 
try so that to-day in an agricultural college or experi- 
ment station, It forms only one of several depart- 
ments Chemistry is a peculiar thing and difficult to 
define in its breadth and depth; it is the great servant 
of everybody ; delves deep, thinks hard, makes great 
discoveries and then, like a faithful servant, retires 
unrewarded for others to take the honor, until the 



time shall appear when its services will again be in 
demand. Indications are not lacking that chemistry 
is making ready to give Agriculture new assistance. 
Since the study of nutrition began, the toughest 
problems for the chemists have been the nature of the 
sugars and the proteins ; two groups of bodies of prime 
significance in the economy of either olants or ani- 
mals Labors of the past twenty years have brought 
us near to the solution of these riddles. Professor 
Fischer of Berlin, after numerous discoveries with 
sugar, is now showing the proteins to be very complex 
structures of derivatives of acetic and allied acids. 
When the protein molecule is fully understood, it will 
probably be the most wonderful thing ever seen by 
human vision. With these additions to our knowl- 
edge, agriculture will certainly practice new methods. 
The great field of study in agriculture, for the near 
future, is physiology ; the physiology of the earth and 
plant and animal; the soil is not something dead or 
inert; it is alive, and almost an organism ; the physi 
ology of the soil must be based on organic chemistry ; 
the modern agricultural college must teach organic 
chemistry as qualitative analysis has been taught for so 
many years. Our students very strongly object to 
taking this study, especially those who are going to be 
mere farmers, as they say. This objection has been 
so common that we resolved last summer, to put forth 
a special effort this year. With the exercise of much 
patience, and with a teacher at the elbow of every 
student in the laboratory, all of these men, including 
those who are to become mere farmers, now realize 
that they are entering into knowledge which lies at the 
foundation of success in agricultural pursuits. At the 
end of this semester we shall have twenty-five young 
men well grounded and ready to pursue studies in 
physiology, botany, entomology, horticulture, field 
culture of all sorts and animal husbandry, at great 
advantage over their predecessors. A large propor- 
tion of them, when they graduate, will have a superior 
foundation for the study of medicine and other occupa- 
tions apart from agriculture, but we hope to succeed in 
persuading them not to follow such callings, but to be 
faithful to the call of agriculture and become research 
workers in experiment stations, teachers and prac- 
tioners in agricultural institutes. In our oldest and 
most unattractive building, where monumental work 
has been done, commencing forty years ago. is 



located the chemical department. We sadly need a 
new laboratory. Six years ago it was proposed to 
erect one at a cost of twenty thousand dollars. The 
plan was not carried out and the college is to be con- 
gratulated that it was not. When we consider the 
work now to be done in chemistry, the expansion 
bound to come within a few years, the relation of 
chemistry and agriculture, and, further, the name 
which this new building is to bear, it must be recog- 
nized that ten times the above amount would not be 
too much to put into it. You will remember that on 
his birthday a year ago, Professor Goessmann was 
presented with a highly decorated transparency which 
now hangs in his study. The Professor has expressed 
the wish that this should eventually be placed in the 
new laboratory. Evidently this fine work of art should 
form the central panel in a beautiful large window to 
lighten the central staircase of the Goessmann 
Laboratory. 

[To be Continued. I 



y. M. C- A. flo*es. 

The Y. M. C. A. meeting of Thursday, Jan. 21, 
was addressed by Mr. A. A. MacKimmie, In the 
introductory part of his talk he spoke of the 
hours which he had spent in the association 
rooms ?t his Alma Mater and the feeling 
of pride with which he looked back at those 
times. He said that the subject of his talk was in 
main a plea for poetry, for the reading and memorizing 
of great thoughts as expressed by the masters. The 
substance of his talk was in brief as follows. 

"Poetry does not appeal to many people and there 
are rrany who think science and poetry are foreign to 
each other. Nevertheless poetry and the classics 
have been the hobby of many of our greatest scien- 
tists. Many of our well known pathmakers have been 
profound students of poetry. 

Emerson has said that we are the heirs of ail the 
ages. But many, as it were, have laid away their 
legacy in their stockings. It is worth while for every 
one' to read and memorize the greatest thoughts that 
have ever been expressed. There are sure to be 
times in one's life when there Is need of such pas- 
sages: For examples there are sleepless nights, 



times of despair, and long walks. The majesty and 
music of Milton's lines are in themselves reasons for 
memorizing portions of his magnificent works. 

The special topic of this talk is to be Dante, first 
because very few know much about him and secondly 
because you may perhaps be led to become well 
acquainted with his great works. 

Daute was born In Florence in 1265, when that city 
was at the height of its prosperity. It was a period 
when there were riots and fights in the streets 
between different political and religious parties. In 
the latter part of his life he took an active part in 
many of these struggles. His parents were wealthy 
and gave him a magnificent education. He studied 
at Bologne, at Padua, at Paris, and at Oxford. 
He married a woman who, although brilliant In 
some ways, was shrewish and also of the opposite 
political party and who made his married life very 
unpleasant. 

He soon entered politics and was elected to one of 
the highest positions in the government. When the 
two opposing parties came to blows and he expelled 
the ring- leaders of both parties his house was raided 
during his absence from the city and his enemies 
succeeded in having him banished from his native 
town. After his death at Ravenna the people 
of Florence tried to secure his ashes to place 
them in their magnificent cathedral but his 
wish and determination in life never to return to his 
native city have bsen respected. 

His greatest work is the great religious poem, 
'* The Divine Comedy." Dante is the patternmaker, 
the pioneer in Italian, for he was the first to write in 
Italian and make of it a medium of melody and 
beauty." 

At this point Mr. MacKimmie read a part of the 
first Canto and repeated a few verses in Italian 
to show the elaborate and beautiful system of rhyme 
which is used in the poem. He concluded by ex- 
pressing the wish that every one present might some- 
time read and study the poems as well as memorize 
many of the beautiful passages. 



'95. — H. D. Hemenway gave an illustrated lecture 
on children's gardens in Carnegie hall, Northampton, 
Wednesday evening, Jan. 20. 



: 







9 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



service of plants and animals. We understand the 
mission of the M. A. C. to be that of a leader in 
agricultural education and as such she must very 
carefully choose her Ideals ; she must take advantage 
of the work of the old college and then push forward 
and upward into the new knowledge on which is based 
modern practical life. The amount of enthusiasm and 
financial expenditure in the Western states In behalf 
of agricultural education is bewildering to the Eastern 
man. The three latest buildings in Iowa Agricultural 
College cost one million dollars. In Wisconsin the 
courses of study and the great onrush in the agri- 
cultural college cause us to wonder and gaze awe- 
struck. We should copy their enthusiasm, their 
liberal expenditure and some of their methods ; for 
others we should look to Germany, England and 
France. As to the degrees of attainment to be 
reached by our four years' men: — If we look at the 
demands placed on our college we see the agricultural 
institutions of instruction, the experiment stations and 
the farms knocking continuously at our doors, asking 
for men to take highly responsible positions. The 
college could furnish a large number of such every 
year. Of the class which graduated last June one 
man was offered as first year a salary of twenty-five 
hundred dollars; the offer was declined because he 
thought he could do better. Another man on the day 
of his graduation accepted a salary of eighteen hundred 
dollars. The reason why we all believe an agri- 
cultural education to be the best, Is, that the student 
Is compelled to see things grow, to learn how things 
grow and to imitate and study growing things. But 
agricultural education itself must grow. Llebig died 
in 1873. He and his co-workers revolutionized agri- 
culture by their achievements in chemistry. These 
came to be called agricultural chemistry and up to 
twenty-five years ago agriculture was not much beside 
what those men taught. Other sciences and arts in 
the succeeding years were organized and strengthened 
and in a measure caught up with agricultural chemis- 
try, so that to-day in an agricultural college or experi- 
ment station, it forms only one of several depart- 
ments. Chemistry is a peculiar thing and difficult to 
define in its breadth and depth; it is the great servant 
of everybody ; delves deep, thinks hard, makes great 
discoveries and then, like a faithful servant, retires 



time shall appear when its services will again be in 
demand. Indications are not lacking that chemistry 
is making ready to give Agriculture new assistance. 
Since the study of nutrition began, the toughest 
problems for the chemists have been the nature of the 
sugars and the proteins ; two groups of bodies of prime 
significance in the economy of either plants or ani- 
mals. Labors of the past twenty years have brought 
us near to the solution of these riddles. Professor 
Fischer of Berlin, after numerous discoveries with 
sugar, is now showing the proteins to be very complex 
structures of derivatives of acetic and allied acids. 
When the protein molecule is fully understood, it will 
probably be the most wonderful thing ever seen by 
human vision. With these additions to our knowl- 
edge, agriculture will certainly practice new methods. 
The great field of study in agriculture, for the near 
future, is physiology ; the physiology of the earth and 
plant and animal; the soil is not something dead or 
inert; it is alive, and almost an organism ; the physi 
ology of the soil must be based on organic chemistry ; 
the modern agricultural college must teach organic 
chemistry as qualitative analysis has been taught for so 
many years. Our students very strongly object to 
taking this study, especially those who are going to be 
mere farmers, as they say. This objection has been 
so common that we resolved last summer, to put forth 
a special effort this year. With the exercise of much 
patience, and with a teacher at the elbow of every 
student in the laboratory, all of these men, including 
those who are to become mere farmers, now realize 
that they are entering into knowledge which lies at the 
foundation of success in agricultural pursuits. At the 
end of this semester we shall have twenty-five young 
men well grounded and ready to pursue studies in 
physiology, botany, entomology, horticulture, field 
culture of all sorts and animal husbandry, at great 
advantage over their predecessors. A large propor- 
tion of them, when they graduate, will have a superior 
foundation for the study of medicine and other occupa- 
tions apart from agriculture, but we hope to succeed in 
persuading them not to follow such callings, but to be 
faithful to the call of agriculture and become research 
workers in experiment stations, teachers and prac- 
tioners in agricultural institutes. In our oldest and 
most unattractive building, where monumental work 



97 



located the chemical department. We sadly need a 
new laboratory. Six years ago it was proposed to 
erect one at a cost of twenty thousand dollars. The 
plan was not carried out and the college is to be con- 
gratulated that it was not. When we consider the 
work now to be done in chemistry, the expansion 
bound to come within a few years, the relation of 
chemistry and agriculture, and, further, the name 
which this new building is to bear, it must be recog- 
nized that ten times the above amount would not be 
too much to put into it. You will remember that on 
his birthday a year ago, Professor Goessmann was 
presented with a highly decorated transparency which 
now hangs in his study. The Professor has expressed 
the wish that this should eventually be placed in the 
new laboratory. Evidently this fine work of art should 
form the central panel in a beautiful large window to 
lighten the central staircase of the Goessmann 
Laboratory. 

[7b be Continued.) 



Y- M. C- A. fJoUs. 



Zmnmm for others to take the honor, until the ta. been done, commencing forty 



years ago, 



is 



The Y. M. C. A. meeting of Thursday, Jan. 21. 
was addressed by Mr. A. A. MacKimmie, In the 
introductory part of his talk he spoke of the 
hours which he had spent in the association 
rooms ?t his Alma Mater and the feeling 
of pride with which he looked back at those 
times. He said that the subject of his talk was in 
main a plea for poetry, for the reading and memorizing 
of great thoughts as expressed by the masters. The 
substance of his talk was in brief as follows. 

"Poetry does not appeal to many people and there 
are many who think science and poetry are foreign to 
each other. Nevertheless poetry and the classics 
have been the hobby of many of our greatest scien- 
tists. Many of our well known pathmakers have been 
profound students of poetry. 

Emerson has said that we are the heirs of all the 
ages. But many, as It were, have laid away their 
legacy in their stockings. It is worth while for every 
one' to read and memorize the greatest thoughts that 
have ever been expressed. There are sure to be 
times in one's life when there is need of such pas- 
sages : For examples there are sleepless nights, 



times of despair, and long walks. The majesty and 
music of Milton's lines are in themselves reasons for 
memorizing portions of his magnificent works. 

The special topic of this talk Is to be Dante, first 
because very few know much about him and secondly 
because you may perhaps be led to become well 
acquainted with his great works. 

Daute was born in Florence In 1265, when that city 
was at the height of its prosperity. It was a period 
when there were riots and fights in the streets 
between different political and religious parties. In 
the latter part of his life he took an active part in 
many of these struggles. His parents were wealthy 
and gave him a magnificent education. He studied 
at Bologne. at Padua, at Paris, and at Oxford. 
He married a woman who, although brilliant In 
some ways, was shrewish and also of the opposite 
political party and who made his married life very 
unpleasant. 

He soon entered politics and was elected to one of 
the highest positions in the government. When the 
two opposing parties came to blows and he expelled 
the ringleaders of both parties his house was raided 
during his absence from the city and his enemies 
succeeded in having him banished from his native 
town. After his death at Ravenna the people 
of Florence tried to secure his ashes to place 
them in their magnificent cathedral but his 
wish and determination in life never to return to his 
native city have bsen respected. 

His greatest work is the great religious poem, 
" The Divine Comedy." Dante is the patternmaker, 
the pioneer in Italian, for he was the first to write in 
Italian and make of it a medium of melody and 
beauty. ' ' 

At this point Mr. MacKimmie read a part of the 
first Canto and repeated a few verses in Italian 
to show the elaborate and beautiful system of rhyme 
which is used in the poem. He concluded by ex- 
pressing the wish that every one present might some- 
time read and study the poems as well as memorize 
many of the beautiful passages. 

'95. — H. D. Hemenway gave an illustrated lecture 
on children's gardens in Carnegie hall, Northampton, 
Wednesday evening, Jan. 20. 



I 






9 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



99 



'j 



I 




D*p&rtmtrvf N°**^ 



DEPARTMENT OF FLORICULTURE. 
The short course in floriculture promises to be a 
success. The course is receiving hearty support from 
the floricultural trade journals and from various prac- 
tical men engaged in the work. Aside from the 
regular lectures of the course, special talks will be 
given each week by some specialist. Peter Fisher 
of Ellis, the introducer of the famous Lawson carna- 
tion the Enchantress. White Perfection and several 
othe'r standard varieties; W. H. EUiottof Brighton, 
rose specialist; Eber Holmes of Montrose; rose 
specialist, E. 0. Orpet of South Lancaster, orch.d 
specialist; William J. Stewart, editor of Horti- 
culture; and George Sinclair of Holyoke have con- 
sented to give these talks, and several others are ex- 
pected. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 
A course in Physiological Chemistry is offered as 
an elective to both Seniors and Juniors. It will be 
given by Dr. Maclaurin. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 
Director William P. Brooks of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Experiment Station is making 
special effort to have the duty removed on all manu- 
rial substances imported into this country in the sched- 
ule of the new tariff which it is expected that Con- 
gress will enact at the special session to be called 
early in March. Professor Brooks points out the 
fact that the question is of great importance to the 
agricultural interests of the whole country, and es- 
pecially to those of New England. 

Bulletin No. 127, on Fertilizer Inspection by H. 
D. Haskins and P. H. Smith of the Experiment 
Station, has recently been published; also a pamph- 
let on Alfalfa by Prof. W. P. Brooks. 

Alumni. 



NOTICE 1 Alumni who have not yet paid 
their subscription to the Signal will confer a 
great favor on the management by remitting at 
once. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The annual meeting and dinner of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College Alumni Club of Massachu- 
setts will be held at the Parker House. Boston, Fri- 
day, Jan. 29. Meeting at 6p.m„ dinner at 7 p. m. 
Our special guest and speaker will be President But- 
terfield, who will speak on his experience as a member 
of the Country Commission. Tickets $2.50. 

Newton Shultis. Secretary. 

The Eighth Annual Reunion and Banquet of the 
Connecticut Valley Association of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Alumni will be held at the Allyn 
House. Hartford, Conn, on Friday evening, Feb. 19 
at seven o'clock. You are cordially invited to attend 
and to extend this notice to all alumni and former 
students. Dinner Tickets $3.00. 

W. B. Hatch, Secretary. 

Torrlngton. Conn. 

ALUMNI GATHERING IN BALTIMORE. 

The second annual gathering of the Fernald Ento- 
logical Club, which was held at the Hotel Eutaw 
Monday evening, December 28, 1908, was attended 
by a large number of Alumni. Dinner was served at 
seven o'clock after which President W.E.Hinds, '99. 
of the Club, serving as toastmaster, called upon Dr. H. 
T. Fernald. Doctor Fernald was given a warm 
reception and his account of the rapid progress that 
M A. C. is making.both In equipment and efficiency, 
was greeted with loud approval. At the close of 
Doctor Fernald's remarks a unanimous standing vote 
was passed approving the work being carried on in the 
Department of Entomology and extending sympathy to 
Professor C. H. Fernald with wishes for a speedy 
recovery from his severe illness. 

Prof. R. A. Cooley, '95. was then called upon and 
gave an interesting account of the great state of 
Montana and of his entomological work, including 
collecting jaunts into the mountains. Dr. E. P. Felt 
•91. and H. L. Frost '95, also gave interesting ac- 
counts of their entomological work, and Dr. H. J. 
Wheeler. '83. of the old days at college. 

Others present at the meeting were A. F. Burgess 
'95 S W Wiley '98, M. H. Pingree and W. A. 
Hooker '99. H. E. Hodgkiss '02, F. D. Couden '04, 
H M. Russell. C. E. Hood and H. F. French '06. 
H. P. Wood, '07, andC. W. Hooker of the Graduate 
School. 



The following officers were elected for the coming 
year: Dr. W. E. Hinds, President; Prof. R. I. 
Smith, Vice President; and W. A. Hooker, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

This Club was organized in 1907 by the M. A. C. 
Alumni attending the Chicago meeting of the Asso- 
ciation of Economic Entomologists, for the purpose of 
promoting mutual acquaintance, good fellowship, and 
to facilitate the transaction of business connected 
with the raising of funds for prizes to be offered by the 
Entomological Department of the college. The Club 
was named in honor of the men who have raised the 
Department to its present high standing of efficiency 
and under whom the members have received their 
collegiate training in Entomology. 

It is hoped that the annual meeting of the Club may 
serve as a time and place at which Alumni, former 
students, and Professors attending the meetings of the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science 
may gather to renew old acquaintances, make new 
ones and drink to the health of old Massachusetts. 

W. A. Hooker, Secretary. 

'82. — Herbert Myrick of Springfield was elected 



president of the National League for Industrial Edu- 
cation, at the conference of educators and men of 
affairs held in New York a short time ago. 
'88.— H. C. Bliss visited college recently. 

'85.— Dr. E. W. Allen of Washington has been 
confined to his bed for a month past with a severe 
attack of rheumatic fever. He Is now on the road to 
recovery. 

'95.— Thomas P. Foley has left his farm in East- 
hampton. and has moved to West Orange, N. J. He 
has recently been in attendance at the Law School of 
New York University. 

'95.— Prof. E. A. White lectured Friday evening, 
Jan. 22, before the South Acton Village Improvement 
Society. The following day he delivered the third 
lecture in the course of Saturday morning lectures 
given by the Horticultural Society in Horticultural 
Hall, Boston. 

'96. —A. M. Kramer visited college recently. 

'97. — Dr. Charles A. Peters states in a letter, 
recently received, that he has taken comfortable quar- 
ters at Eisenachersts 103 III. Berlin W 30. Ger- 
many. 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 



3 It. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DEUEL'S DRUO STORE 






I 










IOO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOR MEN 







Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAII-,OI* 8TOR« 
II AMITY STREET, - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4- 



C & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOI.ENS 

CONFINED STYLES. IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAis/iPiorsi, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMIIKKST. MAS^ 



RaDar's Jnii, 

0M South Strut, oft Main, - NORTH AMI-TON. MASS. 
Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 PER, DAY. 

When in " Ham p." stop with as. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



INTKK-COLLEGIATE BUREAU OF ACADEMIC COSTUME 

Colics* Caps and Gowns. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 

Meist House Mb S(op 

Four First Class Barbers 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



Open Mondays from j 


J A. M. 


to 8 P. M 


Tuesdays ' 


r " 


6 " 


Wednesdays, \ 


r " 


8 " 


Thursdays, / 


. 11 


6 " 


Fridays, 


. (i 


8 « 


Saturdays, ; 


. 11 


11 " 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of F.xcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 95 ' Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



" For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



THE COE-mOBTiEB COPW. 



24-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT & DZT80N 

Manufacturers and Dealers in Hirh Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It in generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRIGHT A OITSON 
have the bent looking;, 
bent fitting; and most 
durable suits. 

The WRIGHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting;. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIGHT «Ss J3ITTS.OIV 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

18 WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providkncb, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 
UNIVERSAL REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

I£. A. THOMF»»OJV, 

Rear First National Bank, AMHERST 



Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 




Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

262 Fourth Av*> , New York. 



? 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GonnsGitcui valley sueei Railway Go, 



4MHKHST DIVISION 

can, will leave Amhei»taml Northampton on the rmurand 
half houMrou..;*' am. till 10.30 P.M. Sundays the flrnt car 
will leave at 8.80 a. u.^^ OBEBMrIBL1>> mass. 
John A.TaKKart Supt. 



Don't Walk on yonr Heels 

To saT* your sole. Come to me for y°" r 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall. 

Can. leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 

"Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO OCT. 4. 1»8. 



"1909" COLLEGE MEN 

SHOULD CONSIDER THESE FACTS 
Pennsylvania is rapidly becoming the foremost High 
School State in the Union. Pennsylvania gives College 
Graduates life certificates of the highest grade after they 

tunities for more in Pennsylvania and other States. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

R. L. Myers & Co. 

ioi Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

i 5 4S Glenarm St., Denver, Colo. 

12-16 Trinity Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 



c. s. gates, r>.r>.». 

DENTAii HOOMS, 

AMHERST, MASS 
CUTLER'S BLOCK. Amnm 



b. bT^ickinsdn. d. d. b. 

DENTAL BOOMS. 

„ AMHERST, MASS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - • A*"*" • 

OFFICE HOOKS: 

» to ia a. JWE-, i-ao to e. i»- »*- 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m., 

* nl \ *> S8 p m The 5.38 p. m. connects 
express, and o.<*« p. *• iUC 

at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 

6.20 P. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J J. W. HANLEY, 

General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



REMOVED 



From over Amherst Bakery to rear of Henry Fishe's two 
btocks down. Will be open and ready to do Cleansing 
«: Altering,also cleansing of ^eckUes , kid g oves, 
etc Look up my ticket system for M. A. C- students. 

GERARD N. LEW, 

Ex. M. A. C, 11 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Msln St., Northampton. 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted tor Its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 A. u. to 4 a. u. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTURES OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



kivee Street, 



Southampton, Mais 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAffl SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



M. A. C. 82, 



FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR, 

Has received the latest fabric* for the spring and Hummer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen'* (iarmeuU. AIho doe* Ladles' 
Garment* in a natisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

^-Military Work a Specialty.,^ 
Under the Post Office, - • Amherst, Mass. 

AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Da it. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICE8. 

D. H. KENDHICK, Proprietor. 

AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



•■VI. A. C. Ai£'t, 



O. K. W Kill I. '«>«» 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

f&SATIBFAOTION OUARAKTHBD. «/o* 

H. A. VTLKT, Managrr. 

OFFICE : 

East Fleasant Street. 

Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE STOKE. 

The Children are Happy. 
Because tbeir clothes are made on the New Home Sewino 
Machine, which fact, assures them of no "rips." Mothers 
should (ret one at once as it will do for their children in years 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 






r 



I 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 



DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, t A. C 

Telephone. 




THE AMHERST 



JI ot(, (1 .va..hbr, I FURNITURE and CARPET STORE 



L. H. ToURTKLOTTK. 



Arthur E. Dorr. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AMD JOBBKHS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 

Corner North and Union Sts., BasemenfS Union St., 
BOSTON. 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



ESTABLISHED 1HS1. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



j^oKillaTQS 
PHOTOGRAFHIC STUDIO 

Society, Clans and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

U2 Main Street. - - - Northampton, Mass 

Tel. 332-2. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



Uniforms 
for all 
Athletic 
Sport* 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



Official 
Implements 
for all 
Track and 
Field Sport* 

Spalding-', handaomely Illustrated catalogue of 

all aoorta contain* numerous suggestion* 

Mailed free anywhere 

A. Q. SPALDINO & BROS. 
73 Federal St., - - Boston. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AMHERST. MASS 



a. H.TROTT 

PLDRBEB. STEM i Gilo FITTER. 

m DEALER II STOVES ill HUB. 



Shop 15 i-j North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-1 1. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger an d Bagga ge Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Raceive Prompt Attention 



A COMPLKTK LINK OK OOOD8 
SL'ITKO TO THK 8TUDBNT8' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



LEW 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Fairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

GERARD- N. LEW. 

PLEASANT ST., REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 

A FULL LINE OF 

Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS AND MANUKACTUKKKH (IK 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 



We handle the best <>( 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, 13.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFK OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 
and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



AttHftSf . /AAS$, 


















II 



^B 



flfoassacbusetts 

HGvtcultural 

Collcae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

— OFFERS— 



♦ 



i CVOB.T COURSES as follows: 

I. bauj** farming Open to persons of both sexes. 

^,» Begin. flr-.Tbursd., in January »r.dcont„.«e, ten week.. 

,. .« R„. Coltdr. Begin, the fonrtb We.\ne«l.y in M.y and 

(b) A Short Course in Bee culture. o e 8 ,uo ■ 

continues two weeks. 

A Su«M«n School o, A— WW- I««««l^ more particularly 'or teacher. 
■5! ■ £ ,f inrroonce eTle form of agricultural infraction into tl.e gr».le, or .nto the 

ture and horticulture. 

™ttw DEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

2. A FOUR Y >*ȣ? f "r*PDioved high schools and academics. Required 

Admission granted on certificate .from »PP^^J Juniof apd Senior years, students 

, ta dies during Freshman >and ^^ ^^^ ta Agriculture, General Horti- 

m ay ekct the major part of their work, g Lam Ucape Gardening, BoUny, Veterin- 

^^^^^^^^^^^ Jt — "*" LaDgUftge9 ' 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Scence 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

ZLL information apply U> the president, Kenton L. Butter^, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SMAL 






VOL. 19 



NO. 9 






MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY lO, 1909 









« .«tronaee we are reliable and well known. 

We would like a share of your patronage, we ^ ^ ^ 

fact everything you need to wear, you w.ll find at 

SANDERSON THOMPSON'S 



GO TO. 



page's Sboe Store 



Next to Post Office. 




LARGEST STOCK W , DE DIS TRIBUTION 

- . . : :♦., n( a tv 



Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



J3UZMILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VlOblH, BRHJO, HMDOHH. GUITAR STKlHGS. 

OCCULI3T8"P^C^IPT ION8 FILLED. 

tIhlT^b e r ■ s 

VARIEITY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 
N e„ .o Post D-V Aini«MT.1A8S. 

5Si^ur Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 



There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
! Lt in 17 Years, has built up a market in 
ir^anonh'JJvUi.dworM. This internatio, 

al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

Ltf tvoewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 

£l„cMor 1 detailed description of its advantage,. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

Hartford, Conn, 
190 Pearl bt., 



«r KavP started a Circulating Library. 
We have •tartod^ ^ q{ ^.^ 



Have all 



COLLEGlT'sUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOSES 
FOR SALE. 

Over .00 good bargams listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R- BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bsnk Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 10, 1909 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Coll«oi Signal. Amhmst. Mass. Tmi Sional will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly ire requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITOSS. 

H.L.WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BRIGGS. 1909, Business Manager. 

W. R. CLARKE, 1910, Assistant Editor. 

E. F. DAMON. 1910, Assistant Business Manager. 



R. C. POTTER. 1909, College Notes. 

M. F. GEER. 1909, Alumni Notes. 

C. H. WHITE, 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notes. 



L. C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Department Notes. 

A. H. SHARPE. 1911. 



E. M. BROWN, 1911. 



Term* i $1.00 per gear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United 



and Canada, Ik. extra. 



The Union. 

Athletic Board. 

Foot- Ball Association. 

Basket-Ball Association, 

Base- Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate, 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
R. H. AHen, Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Musical Association. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R C. Lindblsd. Pres. 
F. T. Haynes, Manager. 
C. H. White, Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office st Amherst. 



Ed i-tb rials. 



The credits awarded members of the Staff for copy 
and work, to and including that for the Issue of Janu- 
ary 27, are published below, according to standing in 
classes. 

1910.— Folsom, 2. 97; McLaine, 2.82; Burke, 
0; Mendum, 0. 

1911.— Blaney, 1.16; Barrows, .57; Dudley, .45; 
Allen, 0. 

1912.— Hills, 6.53; Dodge, 4.85; Brett, 4.16; 
Pratt, 3.98; Hutchings, 1.05; Parker, O ; Hemen- 
way, 0. 



Not the least important item of the legislative 
budget is that asking for $15,000 with which to pur- 
chase land for an athletic field. At a conference, 
held in Boston on Jan. 20th between members of 
the committee of the board of trustees on buildings 
and arrangement of grounds, members of the execu- 
tive committee of the M. A. C. Alumni Athletic 



Association, and other representatives of the alumni, 
the general situation with respect to acquiring land by 
the college for the purpose of an athletic field was 
thoroughly discussed. Dr. Reynolds presented plans 
for a field adequate for one thousand men. The 
conference voted that It was the sense of the con- 
ference that the college should purchase land lying to 
the south of the present college grounds, and that 
the alumni should by all legitimate means assist In 
presenting this need of the college to the Legislature. 
Without vote, the following general conclusions were 
subscribed to as representing the sentiment of the 
conference : 

1. "That the athletic field should be located on 
land lying to the south of the present college property, 
and on or near Lincoln avenue. 

2. That, if the college assigns land permanently 
for the purpose of an athletic field, the alumni should 
endeavor to provide for the fitting of the field for ath- 
letic purposes. 

3. That, under some general proposition to be made 



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*°3 




I 









i^hTfu^Tby^ college, the various *£*!£ 
portions now owning land In the vicinity of I the 1 ege 
estate should endeavor to comply with the wishes of 
h colUe with respect to location of future fraterni y 
houses, and the exchange of property with the college 
on the basis of a fair appraisal of va ues 

Options upon the necessary parcels of U have 
* secur ed It remains to secure the purchase 
m oney Resident Butterfield, the trustees, and the 
rommiueeof the M. A. C. Alumni Athletic Associa 
tioT are already working hard. It is urgent that 
1 umn an udents bring every possible influence to 
beaTw th members of the legislature in favor of the 

^— at t th^c^o^rr^ 

mur district, explaining clearly to him the nee 
of the appropriation. For once in your co leg 
care do something for your Alma Mater tha tw 
be asting in its results. Don't leave your duty to be 
done y the other fellow. He cannot do ,t. Co- 
ordinate individual effort counts in a democracy 



The score at the end of the first half was 3-1 in 
Springfield's favor. It took 1 5 minutes f or JUT com 
hination to get to work in the second, ™*~^ 
we made the score 4-3, in our favor. Two m mutes 
later Field tied the score. Then Gahan. T. S. cove 
point came to the front and shoved the winning tally 

through, after a few passes. 
The line up : 



goal. 

point, 
cover point, 

center, 
left wing, 
right wing, 
rover. 



M. A. C. 

Hemenway 

Hathaway 

Adams 

Brandt, (capt.) 

Sanctuary. Bentley 

Norris 

Peckham 

Goals. Norris 2. 



/UMe*ic No*"- 



t „, ac tl<-e relay race in preparation lor the B. A. 

A a jt« £?«* - «<*«* t w u ; n 

. 97 nn the Amherst track. Our team 

tsVrsh^ 7 g o;"„r m and ability ,0 recover lost 
lost, but show ; g m ^ un ,ortunately lost 

twa third a lap. placing his ,ea m - m a,es a, a 
aboutatntroo r Dickinson was un- 

d , SJ dvan,age a. the very star. ^ 

Me ,08a, "'redsth,yonh,s m an. Dudley rapid- 
Crossman. ga ned s l.ly ^ ^ ^ 

STllT Ter, and .inlshed only about ,2 
yards behind him. 

HOCKEY. 

S. T. S., 5; M. A. C, 4. 

T Zl sides Our team work was weak, ex- 

S^—^ing which our scoring was done. 



Training School 5 ■J^*£« sn! T^oTE*^ 
Brandt 2 F«»J 2 ; ^J J Empire Haddock. 
20 minutes. Referee neai. v 

Amherst, 3; M. A. C, 0. 
Amherst College hockey team defeated our team 
ln Z interesting game on Pratt Rtek. M* 
hv a score of 3-0. The team wotk of Amherst was 
gea" -perior to ours although at times especi- 
al n the second half, we braced and worked to- 
'her well. During the first half the play was we 
tr" Jed over the whole rink, but during the seco 
hai our men, mostly by individual work, kept th 
puk the Amherst side of the rink. Ambers 
cored twice in the second half, and only once m the 
ir This was by San Souci, after a long series rf 
lasses For us. Norris and Peckham rushed well. 
^Brandt got in some good drives Hathaway 

Ide two hard stops just before the half closed 
it the second half Washburn shot a goal af e 
In tne seco p ec kham did 

about five minutes of play. Norris ana 
excellent rushing, some of their drives almost get 
by Wycoff. Cornell shot a goal ten seconds before 
the game ended, making the score 3-0. 

The game was characterized by frequent falls on 

u.i n„r men Roughness was in evidence 
the part of our men. ixuu 6 

n K.th sides Sibley being banished from 
at times on both sides bio y s p cckhatn . 

the game for one minute for thts reason 
Norris, and Hathaway excelled for us, and San Sou*. 
Washburn, and Wycoff for Amherst. 

The line up: amherst 



M. A. C. 

Hemenway. 
i Hathaway. 



goal, 
point. 



Wycoff 
Babcock 



Sibley 

San Souci 

Storke, Miller 

Washburn 

Cornell 

Goals — San Souci, 



Adams. cover point. 

Sanctuary, Bentley. center, 

Norris. left wing, 

Brandt, right wing, 

Peckham. rover, 

Score — Amherst, 3; M. A. C, 0; 
Washburn. Cornell. Referee— Dr. Dalton of N. Y. A. C. ; 
Assistant referee — Carpenter. Umpire at the goals— Pratt. 
Dr. Reynolds ; Timer — Chapin ; Time of halves— 20 min. 

M. I. T., 1; M. A. C„ 0. 

The hockey team representing Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology defeated our aggregation last Sat- 
urday on the College pond. The game was an Inter- 
esting one to watch, but it was necessarily unscien- 
tific, for in places the water was nearly two inches 
deep. About half of the surface of the rink was 
under water, making real playing an impossibility, 
aiding the defense but retarding the offense. 

The only score of the game came about four min- 
utes before the close of the first half, Kelley getting 
the shot. The play was in our part of the field most 
of the time, and it was only Hathaway's and Acker- 
man's excellent defensive work that kept the score 
down. Occasionally our men got together and carried 
the puck to Tech's goal, but could not score. Peck- 
ham and Norris figured prominently in these charges. 
The line-up : 



M. 1 T. 




M. A. c. 


Davis, 


goal. 


Ackerman 


Billings. Taylor. 


point. 


Hathaway 


A. Gould, 


cover point, 


Walker. Phelps 


Paine, 


center, 


Brandt 


Kelley, Gould, 


left wing, 


Sanctuary. Puffer 


O'Hern. 


right wing, 


Norris 


Sloan, 


rover. 


Peckham 


Referee — Dr. Reyno 


ds. Umpire- 


-Johnson. Timer — 


Regan. Goal — Kelley. 


Time — 15-mii 


lute halves. 



BASKETBALL. 

Dartmouth, 40; M. A. C, 11. 

Our basketball team was easily defeated by Dart- 
mouth on their floor Saturday, Jan. 30. The unevenness 
of the score was due to a large extent, to the fact 
that two of our men were new men, Moreau taking 
Neale's place at right guard, and Pearson replacing 
Regan at right forward. Dartmouth's defense was 
strong, Schermerhorn being the only man able to 
score a basket from the floor for Massachusetts. 
Brady was the star player for the Green, scoring 1 1 



baskets and 6 fouls, Burke threw 7 fouls, and Hos- 
mer two. The scores: 



DARTMOUTH. 

Hedges, r. f., 
Brady. 1. f.. 
Dingle, a, 
Avery, r. g., 
Mullen, 1. g.. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. g.. Hosmer 

r. g., Moreau 

c, Schermerhorn 

l.f.. Burke 

r. f., Pearson 



Score— Dartmouth 40, Massachusetts 11. Goals from 
floor— Brady 11, Dingle 3, Hedges. Avery, Mullen. Scher- 
merhorn. (ioals from fouls— Burke 7. Hosmer 2. Brady 6. 
Referee— Hardy of Cushing. Scorer— Sherwin. Timer — 
Ryan. Time — 20-minute halves. Attendance — 200. 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE. 

The baseball schedule for the coming season Is as 
follows; 
April 10— Rhode Island State at Amherst. 

14 — Brown at Providence, R. I. 

16 — Tufts at Amherst. 

17 — Worcester Tech at Amherst. 

24— Williams at Williamstown. 

28— Tufts at New York. 

30 — Bates at Amherst. 
8 — Amherst College at Amherst. 

1 1 — University of Vermont at Amherst. 

15 — Boston College at Boston. 

21 — University of Vermont at Burlington. 

24— Middlebury College at Middlebury, Vt. 

28— S. T. S. at Amherst. 

29— St. Lawrence University at. Canton, N. Y. 

30— Clarkson Tech at Potsdam, N. Y. 

2 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
5— S. T. S. at Springfield. 

12 — Boston College at Amherst. 

19 — Alumni at Amherst. 



May 



June 



RELAY TEAM WINS. 



At the annual indoor meet of the Boston Athletic 
Association last Saturday night, the relay team easily 
beat Worcester Polytechnic Institute In 3 min. 16 
sec. A summary cf the team races, in order of 
time made, follows: 

Team race between Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
and Syracuse University — Won by Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology (K. D. Femstorm. A. L. Moses. W. Salisbury, 
C. W. Gram). Time. 3.10. 

Team race between Boston Athletic Association and New 
York Athletic Club— Won by Boston Athletic Association 
(W. C. Prout. B. W. Estabrook, B. L. Young, E. E. Nason). 
Time, 3.10 2-5. 












THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»°5 



Team race between Harvard and C-nell-Won by Cor- 
nell C. M. French. E. G. McArthur. R. Smnh. R. L. Hurl 

"tJZ'Xl^ Bowdoln and Tufts-Won by Bow- 

d tarn T :ac e e between Amherst and Brown-Won by Brown 
{J W Mayhew, D. R. Mahoney. J. P. Hart.gan. F. 

Y T c t .rHarvardteshrnenand Yale P-h-en-Won 
by Ya£ (G. A. Chisholm. Boyd. X. J. Farrar; F. P. Mulhns). 

^Te^'race'between Massachusetts Agricultural College 
and Worcester Polytechnic ,nstitute-Won »*£**?% 
Agricultural College (P. C Warner. L. S. D.ckinson. S. S. 

Athlet" Club of New York-Won by Harvard (Boyden. Hoyt 

W T r ^betwT Bolfon College and Holy Cross 
win by Holy Cross (W. F. McKenna. F. J. Maynes. E. G. 
Coeswell. G. W. Jones). Time. 3.16. 

Team race between University of Pennsylvania and Col- 
umbia University-Won by Pennsylvania (Hough. He.ntz. 
Mind* Hartranft). Time. 3.16 3-5 

^eam le between Williams and Wesleyan-Won by 
Wesleyan (W. E. Robson. L. F. Connor. L. Wood. R. W. 

^am iT^"*-* of Maine. University of 
Vermont and Bates College-Won by Maine: Vermont. 2d 

Time. 3.20 4-5. 



Collet N°^i$- 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Feb 1 1 -Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 

Debating Club. 7-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
Feb. *-£. -F™, Dr.1. IH* I ^—^^j^ January 

Feb. 14.-Ves P ers 5-OOP m nunap L,. and imorovement of the corn crop in Ma, 



Prof. F. C. Sears spoke before a farmers' institute 
at Hardwick, Saturday, Jan. 30. 

Irving G. Davis of Auburn, Me., Bates, '06, has 
registered as a Junior in agriculture. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Forristall have returned from 
a visit in New York City and vicinity. 

Word has been received of the death of the father 
of R D. Lull, '09, at his home, Windsor, Vt. 

The College Shakespearean Club held a banquet 

at the Amherst House, Tuesday evening, Jan. 26. ^ 

Dr G E Stone gave a lecture on "Shade Trees" 

before the Stockbridge Club, Tuesday evening, Jan. , 

26, in Clark Hall. 

F M Gracey has been engaged to supply the pul- 
pit of the Methodist Church at Cushman and began 
his duties Sunday, Feb. 7. 

Dr MacLaurlm has had the laboratory of organic 
chemistry cleaned and repainted in preparation for the 
course in physiological chemistry. 

F T Haynes. '10. gave a talk on " Indifference " 
before the Y. M. C. A. Thursday, January 28. An 
enthusiastic open meeting followed. 

D A Sheehan, '12, has been very ill with typhoid 
fever and pneumonia and was taken to his home in 
South Lincoln. Saturday, February 6. 

Professor J. A. Foord addressed the Easthampton 



p;«, George Harris, Amherst. I care and Improvement o. the corn crop In Massachu- 

rr k ia qtockbridee Club. 7-00 p. m. In Agricul- setts." 
t k ,7 Asssembly 1-30 p.m. in Chapel. p , es , n Sunderland, two evenmgs a week . W.t. 

1 k« nn ^ntn MO 



River. 
Feb 18 -Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m in Chapel. 
Debating Club, 7-45 p. m. in Chapel 
Feb. 20.-Basketball, Springfield Training School at 

Springfield. 
Feb 21. -Vespers, 5-00 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, 
Rev. E. M. Antrim, Springfield 



Mendum, '10. 

Prof L. B. Judson of Cornell University spent 
Monday, Jan. 25, looking over the equipment of the 
division of horticulture with special reference to the 
new range of greenhouses. 

Frederick W. Bancroft of Boston, entertained the 



Rev. E. M.Antrim, Springfield. r™. • Sa , urday even i„ g , January 30 

Feb. 23.-S.oc k b„dge Club, 7-00, -. Agriculture \^™^^ ^ ^ -1^ ^ ^ w 

Room. This was one of the weekly Union entertain 

Feb. 24-Assembly, 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. Men- lad. This 

delssohn- Chopin Concert. I menu> - 



The Senior Minstrel Show was given at New Brain- 
tree, Friday evening, January 29, under the auspices 
of the Ladies' Aid Society. The management is 
planning a four days' tour, the profits to be divided 
among the troupe. 

The course in junior agriculture will be changed 
somewhat. In place of one course in agronomy being 
given alone, two courses, one in animal husbandry 
for two hours a week, and one in agronomy three 
hours a week, will be given. 

Rev. Thomas Van Ness of Boston, Billings lect- 
urer for the Connecticut Valley conference of Unitar- 
ian and other liberal christian churches, addressed 
Assembly, Wednesday, January 27, his subject be- 
ing "Tolstoi, or some of the Russian Revolutionists 
I have met." 

Theta Phi fraternity has rented the house at 88 
Pleasant St. The following members are rooming 
there: C. S. Putnam, B. F. Barnes, '09; J. R. 
Fisk, S. W. Mendum, H. T. Cowles, J. C. Bailey, 
D. E. Bailey, '10; A. P. Burseley. R. H. Patch, 
II ; A. R. Lundgren, R. E. Reed, '12. 

Dr. Cance will give the elective course in The 
Agricultural Industry this semester. This course 
was given the second semester of last year by Presi- 
dent Butterfield. Dr. Cance has made a special 
study of rural affairs, having received his Ph. D. in 
agricultural economics at the University of Wisconsin. 

The vesper service, Sunday, January 24, was ad- 
dressed by Rev. L. P. Powell of Northampton. His 
subject was "Youth." The speaker was to have 
been President W. E. Huntington of Boston Univer- 
sity, but because of illness, he was unable to speak 
and exchanged with Dr. Powell who was to have 
spoKen later. 

At the celebration of the Lincoln centenary to be 
held in the town hall, Friday evening, February 12, 
under the auspices of the Amherst Historical Society. 
President Butterfield will preside and speak of Lincoln 
as an administrator. Other speakers will be Presi- 
aent Harris, and Professors Morse, Grosvenor and 
Genung of Amherst. 

The Program Committee of the Debating Club has 
arranged the following program of debates. 

February 1 1. — Resolved, — That coeducation in the 



higher institutions of learning is preferable to the 
segregation of the sexes. Speakers on the affirma- 
tive : Brlggs, '09; Baker, 'II; Southwick, '12; (al- 
ternate). Speakers on the negative; Folsom, '10; 
Baird, '12; Turner, '09, (alternate). 

February 18. — Resolved, — That the United States 
government should establish a parcels post. Affir- 
mative: Leonard, '10; Clapp, '12;Smulyan, '09, 
(alternate). Negative : Cardin, '09; Ostrolenk, 'II ; 
Roberts 12, (alternate). 

February 25. — Resolved, — That the growth of 
large fortunes should be checked by a graduated in- 
come tax. Affirmative: Haynes, '10; Brett, '12, 
Hills, '12, (alternate). Negative: Brown, '09; 
Dudley, 'II ; Potter, '09, (alternate). 

March 4. — Resolved,— That free trade with the 
Philippines should be established. Affirmative: Ide, 
'09; Sharpe, 'II; French, '10. (alternate), Nega- 
tive: McLaine, '10; Dodge, '12; C. H. White, 
'09, (alternate.) 

President Butterfield is attending a hearing before 
the committee on agriculture in Boston, today, rela- 
tive to the bill to reimburse the college for losses 
occasioned by the fire last summer. 



NEW ENGLAND FEDERATION MEETS AT 
ORONO. 

H. W. French, '10, Elected President. 

At the annual meeting of the New England Federa- 
tion of agricultural students held at the University of 
Maine, at Orono, Jan. 20 and 21, Horace Wells 
French, '10, was elected president. The other 
officers of the Federation are: Vice-president, D. W. 
Anderson, of New Hampshire State college ; secre- 
tary and treasurer, L. L. Mounce of Rhode Island 
State college. 

On the afternoon of Jan. 20 the delegates attended 
the dedication ceremonies of the new agricultural 
building. In the evening at the business meeting 
the officers were elected for the ensuing year. 

Five of the New England colleges were represented. 
Connecticut sent no delegate as there is no agri- 
cultural club there. 

On the morning of the 21st came the literary part 
of the program held in one of the lecture rooms of the 
new agricultural buildings. It was well attended and 




■ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



107 








was enioyed by all present. The program consisted 

was enjoyea vy v Helepates The meeting was 

nf naDers S. ven by the delegates. i»* 

of papers giv j Pres ident and the 

called to order at 10-15 bv me 

naoers read. Maine gave a paper on Poultry , v 

P nl ' Dairying" : Rhode Island on "Agricultural 
EdTcat on' New Hampshire on "The Rural Home 
ISZ Surroundings" and Massac.usetts on ^Truc 
Gardening." The meeting then adjourned. The next 
annu 1 meeting will be held at the M«ch^£ 
Agricultural college under the auspices of the Stock- 

bridge Club. 

MASSACHUSETTnGRICULTORAL 
COLLEGE. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES, BY F. H. FOWLER, '87 

12. Scholarships. 

Th. scholarship Idea appears ,0 have b "" 
a J a „c=d b p'iL, French. .0, In Ihe ihlrd report 
of "he tr utees (January, 1866) he Intimated . 

heirships might be established, b, Su or P 

bounty, in aid o. such students as need^ ^ ecu y 

,,„.., nr - The following year President t^nao 
assistance. ^ , educa . 

b0, " ne ' a That t wa desirable to diminish expense 
::^h"cou"bedoneby,hees,abUshrnen,o, 

ships - tetur:;::;, «a, tool, : *. s- 

Th'ave a^ as. scholarship a, its disposal, to be 

Lbv examination of applicants for the place. 

'a! ' so y rnu"hTowards permanently diminishing ,h. 

cost of education fo, a student of Us own choice 

A, he annual meeting of the State Board of Agr, 

t ,J?B67 President Chadbourne made sugges 

:,o r w oh 6 lid *; Board to adopt a resolution re. 

L. .„ «ach agricultural society, receiving the 
ommend ng to each agri ^ ^ sch(jlar . 

^r,„l MfsTachuseU Agricultural College, either 

b "'a "0^ stated appropriation from year to 

L, to be granted to some young man residing 

So In.Uofsa.d society anc .that in these, . 

-l—:^rer,0 b ay,:uura, pursuits 

taken by the Board In 1 873 and In 1 875 . 

The sixth report of the trustees (January, 1869) 
Jwed *a. nelly all of the agrlcu.tura. societies 



had responded and were maintaining scholarships- 

naa respo m , wo 

one society was supporting three, two so 

each, and sixteen societies one eac . ™« ^ °< 

the succeeding year stated that nearly all of the thirty 

oCe l«sn 'he State had established one o, more 

scholarships, the advantages of which were en, , yed 

by students selected from their respective Mm £ 

committees apolnted for the purpose. In his repo t 

PrTsTden, Clark suggested the founding of free schoU 

arahips by the payment Into the treasury of $1,000 

h; the establishing o, a loan fund, from w ,ch 

students might borrow such small sums as, from time 

to time might be necessary to enable them to 

emTnin college; o, the g... to the •-*•«••* 

money the Income of which should be expended In 

^e form of liberal wages for manual labor, as ways 

o, , nderlng assistance to the large number of worthy 

^ng men who were striving to secure an education 

at the college with very limited means. 

The Class of 1871. at, heir parting «W".»£ 
to establish a perpetual scholarship amounting to $72 
oer yea to be called the "Pioneer Scholarship of 
87. "and to be awarded to that student of the 
Freshman Class who should comply with certain con- 
ditions among which were that the successful com 
P em 7Z attain a rank In scholarship above 90 ; 
h!s deportment mus.be .00. and he must have no 

Un St, a C| e rre.erred to th, society scholarships 
Jhetenm annua, report of the trustees ( anuar 
8 3) *>d complained because man, of them had 
a,"d to make the usual appropriation, ncwltnstand- 
arnes. applications In several cases from worth 
-.„ needlne such assistance. He said thai 
n Allure «o e up this most Important connection 
* h e oC seemed ,0 have been the result either 
I ,„ ^ ence to the subiec, o, agrlcu.tura. educa ion 
o, of a feeling .bat as there were students enough m 
attendance no further effort was "-""J* 

in the fourteenth annual report of the ; "ustMs 
( pluary, ,877) I. was stated that the sco,^ 

established and maintained by some of the agncu 

H 3 1 societies had enabled several young men to avail 
tural societies n facilities for an education 

themselves of tne ampi= 

which the college offered, men who could not hav- 
Lained there without this assistance h. 
scholarships had thus done great good, but that 



number was too liir.ited to meet the wants of the 
institution. As a means for increasing the number 
of scholarships, it was suggested that there seemed to 
be no method so just, so simple, and so little burden- 
some to the State treasury and to the public, as to 
set apart a certain percentage of the surplus of what 
was commonly known as the "Dog Fund"; that the 
small fraction of fifteen per cent of this surplus 
would be sufficient to establish a scholarship in every 
representative district in the State, or something over 
two hundred in all ; and that such scholarships should 
be awarded on ? fair competitive examination, and 
thus they would operate as a stimulus to exertion 
throughout all the public schools of the State, since 
they would become a reward for faithfulness and pro- 
ficiency in study, and secure a more direct connection 
of the college with our public school system. 

Brief reference is made to bequests of $1 ,000 each 
by Miss Mary Robinson, of Medford, in 1874; by 
Whiting Street, of Northampton, in 1879; and by 
Henry Gassett, of North Weymouth, In 1887, the 
income to be used for scholarship purposes. 

In January. 1878, the trustees offered a free 
scholarship to one student from each congressional 
district in the State the applicant to be selected by the 
member of congress from said district, said student 
to be well advanced in preparation and well recom- 
mended for integrity and good moral conduct who 
should pledge himself to remain through the course 
and favor in his profession and pursuit in life the inter- 
est in agriculture. In June of the same year they 
voted that each alumnus be allowed to nominate a 
suitable candidate for admission to the Freshman 
class, who should have free tuition during the course, 
subject to the conditions imposed upon other students. 

In Governor Long's inaugural address of Jan. 5, 
1832, we find advocacy of the idea that each agri- 
cultural society receiving the bounty of the State 
should appropriate a small part of it — less than a 
hundred dollars — towards maintaining at the college a 
scholar from its own limits. 

At a special meeting of the trustees, following the 
death of President Chadbourne, in March, 1883, the 
ate 0. B. Hadwen of Worcester advocated the 
establishment by the Legislature of free scholarships 
as a means of filling the college, and upon his motion 
a committee was appointed to appear before the Com- 



mittee on Agriculture of the Legislature and advocate 
such a plan. The result was the enactment of legis- 
lation (Resolves of 1883. Chapter 46) providing for 
the grant of $10,000 annually to the college for the 
term of four years and the establishment of 80 free 
scholarships to be assigned equally to each senatorial 
district, the same to be given by appointment to per- 
sons within the Commonwealth, after a competitive 
examination, at such time and place as the senator 
then in office from each district should designate. 
This appropriation and these scholarships were made 
permanent by the Legislatura of 1886. In 1904 the 
appropriation was increased to $15,000 and the num- 
ber of scholarships to 120. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REUNION 

of The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Club of New York, at Hotel St. Denis, 

Dec 4, 1908. 

[Continued] 

Dr. Morris: Agriculture is destined to become 
one of the great professions, because it now gives full 
scope to various types of mind. The creative mind, 
the inventive mind, and the collaborative mind all 
have at the present day a basis for satisfactory work in 
the classified knowledge which has been assembled in 
recent years in theoretical and applied agriculture. 
Every one of the natural sciences has a direct bearing 
upon the subject, and one can work both ways; from 
any one science to Its application In agriculture, or 
from agriculture back into any one science for which 
one sees particular need in his own work. Personally 
I have taken up agriculture merely for recreation, as a 
matter of rest for a very busy man. It is a little more 
expensive than my yachting arid foreign travel, but Is 
more satisfactory in its opportunities for doing con- 
structive new work. The farm work of my boyhood 
days was, however, an object lesson in the difficulties 
which the farmer has in grasping great principles. 
When he has to get up at four o'clock in the morning, 
with the thermometer away down below zero, break 
the ice in the pitcher before he can use the wash-bowl, 
stumble over things, half asleep, until he has found 
the lantern, and then at the barn try to balance him- 
self on a two-legged stool while the heifer swishes her 
icy tail around his neck and refuses to "give down'' 
until he has gone and got a log chain to hang over the 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



109 












small of her back. He does not merrily make 
mergers that startle China. When the hard day s 
work was done on the farm in those days, we did not 
ever care so much for speculative philosophy as we 
did for sitting around the stove at the grocery and tell- 
ing stories, meanwhile appropriating various pieces 
cheese or crackers and making personal comment 
about the neighbors who came in to get their mail. 
My present farm is not very far from New York, bu 
I found that the question of markets required special 
genius, and so much time, that 1 have given up 
ordinary market crops and various fruit orchards, and 
have settled down to nut culture for the chle work 
the farm. This subject alone has ^eloped to such 
an extent that 1 find one could devote his whole life 
time to the shag bark hickory alone and not compre- 
hend that one subject even as , .result o In ensv 
specialization. There Is more than a mile of trout 
stream on the place, and yet 1 do not get time to go 
fishing, because of the problems in nut culture which 
lust be worked outright away. There is hardly a 
rocky acre In New England which will not yield more 
than a hundred dollars' worth of nuts per year There 
s always a ready market for the Persian walnut the 
black walnut, four of the fourteen kinds of American 
hickories, chestnuts, hazels and many other native 
and introduced kinds if we choose the right sort and f 
they are propagated by grafting. We have to experi- 
ment a great deal in order to find the particular kind 
that is adapted to anyone particular locality, and there 
is nothing more enjoyable than this sort of work when 
one is sure that It will be profitable in the end Ac- 
cording to the Yearbook of the Department of Agri- 
culture for 1907, we imported nuts In 1903 to he 
value of over four million dollars, and In 1907 to the 
value of nearly ten million dollars, and most of these 
nuts could have been raised In the United States ,f we 
had cared to do it. We not only could have raised 
ten million dollars' worth of nuts more than we did, 
but could probably have exported nuts of still greater 
value in the year. This resource Is just on the verge 
of development. There are two journals and three 
books in America, however, devoted to the subject of 
nut culture already. We have a good many nut 
raisers In the United States at the present time with 
incomes of net profit from five to ten thousand dollars 
a year but we are soon to see the time when men can 



smoke their pipes and sit on the veranda and watch in- 
comes rolling in like those of the South American 
plantation lords. The reason why they have these 
great Incomes in South America is, because they are 
too lazy to work, and have plenty of time to sit down 
and think, whereas the New England farmer, who has 
to put all of his energy into a crop of potatoes which is 
Hkely enough to fail anyway, has hard work to pay the 
interest on the mortgage on his farm. This is, 
because of his unfortunate inheritance of Indomitable 
perseverance and Industry which leaves no time for 
the free lance thought which hits targets. The appoint- 
ment of a commission on country life is one of the 
most important moves that ever has been made in 
America. The German Emperor has changed the 
entire aspect of education in that country by his 
establishment of Industrial schools. H is tremendous 
.'treibende Kraft" has resulted perhaps in making the 
industrial school his greatest monument. His tend- 
ency to carry personal beliefs into matters of dip 
lomat.c importance has aroused of late an enormous 
onset of attack, but those of us who understand he 
temper of German monarchlal thought know that It .s 
merely the scolding of a father by a lot of loving 
children. In the same way, President Rooseve 
comes in for a great amount of criticism, because 
the inevitable political bearing of every move which he 
makes We must overlook this side of the matter; 
and some of us believe that his appointment of a com- 
mission on country life is to prove the greatest monu- 
ment of his career. Upon th » basis of the data whi.h 
will be made available, farmers can have better social 
We better markets, better roads, better banking, 
bettor hygiene and all of the things that lead to higher 
planes of living. I believe there will also be a 
tendency, as the result of the work of the commission, 
to turn the tide of young people back from the cities 
into the country. I would have city life for two years 
as a part of the curriculum of every farmer s educa- 
t, n but with a post graduate course back where the 
best new work for the individual and for the nation is 
to be done. ^ ^ £££j 



'91 -Howard N. Legate is suffering with an 
attack of typhoid fever, but his condition is not con- 
sidered serious. He passed his law examination last 
summer and was admitted to the bar. 



Dfp&r-tmfrYf ^lotfs. 



HORTICULTURE. 

The short course students in floriculture visited the 
establishment of A. N. Pierson of Cromwell, Conn., 
Saturday, Jan. 30. This is one of the largest com- 
mercial glass house ranges in New England. 

The dedication of French Hall and the new range 
of greenhouses will take place on March 12. The 
speaker will be John K. L. M. Farquhar of Boston. 
A flower exhibit will be held at the same time in 
French Hall. Mr. Farquhar will speak on some 
broad aspect of the glass house business. 

A very interesting apple exhibit was given Tuesday 
evening, Jan. 26, by the senior class in pomology. 
The apples were from the prominent apple sections 
of this country and Canada. The special exhibits 
were from British Columbia, McDonald Agricultural 
College at Montreal, Nova Scotia, Oregon, Ontario. 
Colorado, Kansas, Geneva Experiment Station of 
New York, Vermont, Connecticut and the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. The finest specimens 
were from British Columbia and Colorado, while the 
New York exhibit was not up to the standard. There 
was an especially interesting show of Ben Davis 
apples, showing different specimens from the Ben 
Davis sections of the country; also some specimen 
boxes of apples packed by the class in pomology. 
There were also special exhibits of the different forms 
of packages, and spraying apparatus. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh has purchased the George 
Seitz place on the Bay Road, in connection with the 
Bay Road Fruit Farm. 

AGRICULTURE. 

The Livestock Breeders' Association of the Con- 
necticut valley met yesterday in the Drill Hall. An 
address of welcome was given by President Butter- 
field. H. H. Wing, professor of animal husbandry 
at Cornell University, spoke on "The dairy cow." 
At the afternoon session addresses were made by 
Philip H. Smith of the experiment station on "Feed- 
stuffs and their adulteration," and Ray L. Gribben, 
instructor at the college, on "Feeding the dairy cow." 
ENGLISH. 

Prof. Robert Neal of the Massachusetts Agricul- 



tural College has written a story entitled "A Matter 
of Patriotism," which will be published by the New 
York Herald. This is one of the stories accepted by 
the Herald in its $2,000 short-story contest. It con- 
cerns a college professor, and a college graduate who 
has enlisted in the Philippine service, and is based 
upon a number of court-martial episodes reported 
from the Philippines, while the campaigns In the 
islands were at their fiercest. 

BOTANY. 
At Clark Hall Dr. Stone is carrying on his study of 
the diseases of lettuce and tomato; a bulletin on the 
latter will soon be published. A miniature cascade , 
also fresh and salt water aquaria are being erected 
for the study of submerged plant life. 



Alu 



mm, 



Notice ! Alumni who have not yet paid their 
subscription to the Signal will confer a great 
favor on the management by remitting at once. 
NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The sixth annual meeting of the M. A. C. Club of 
Washington, D. C. will be held at the Y. M. C. A. 
building, 1736 G St. N. W., this city, at 7 p. m.. 
Feb. 13, 1909. All alumni and former students of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College are eligible 
to membership in the Club, and are invited to attend. 
A card to the secretary will reserve a plate for you. 
F. D. Couden, Secretary, 

1310 Columbus Road, 

Washington, D. C. 
The eighth annual reunion and banquet of the 
Connecticut Valley Association of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Alumni will be held at the Allyn 
House, Hartford, Conn, on Friday evening, Feb. 19 
at 7 o'clock. You are cordially invited to attend and 
to extend this notice to all alumni and former students. 
Dinner Tickets $3.00. 

W. B. Hatch, Secretary, 

Torrington, Conn. 
Fifty graduates and guests attended an enthusiastic 
banquet of the Boston Alumni Club held at the Parker 
House, Boston. Jan. 29. Franklin W. Davis. '89, 
presided. A large number of the younger graduates 
were present and the old yell and the new rang out 












I 



I IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 1 1 



riendly rivalry. The principal discussion of the 
evening concerned an athletic field, deciding 
that the alumni should assist in presenting the cause 
to the Legislature and should endeavor to equip the 
field. Particulars concerning the attendance and 
speakers will be given later. 

72.— John Clarence Cutter of Worcester, died 
Feb 2. after a lingering illness of rruny years. Dr. 
Cutter was born in Warren, July 30, 1851, the son 
of Dr Calvin and Eunice Cutter. He gained his 
early education In the Warren schools, and gradu- 
ated from the Massachusetts Agricultural College in 
1872 and then went to Hanover, N. H.. and took 
the full course in the Dartmouth Medical College. 
In 1879 he went to Sapparon, Japan, to accept a 
position as professor in the agricultural college founded 
there by Prof. William Clark of Amherst. He held 
the position for 10 years.acting also as government phy- 
sician and consulting physician to the mikado, for 
which he was under a salary from the Japanese gov- 
ernment While there he was knighted by order of 
the mikado, and received the order of the Rising 
Sun at that time having a gold chain bracelet fas- 
tened about his wrist, and it remained there until his 
d-ath After his return to this country he went to 
Germany to study skin diseases for a year in 1890, 
and upon his return opened an office in Worcester 
His health becoming poor, however, he traveled 
throughout North America from Mexico to Alaska, 
later returning to Worcester where he had been an 
invalid for over 10 years. He was a member of Qua- 
boag lodge of Masons since 1878, and also a mem- 
ber of King Solomon chapter of Royal Arch Masons. 
75 —Prof W P. Brooks spoke Jan. 29. before 
the farmers' institute at Berlin on "The rotation of 

crops." _ 

•78— Chas E. Lyman, Middiefield. Conn., gave 

a very interesting lecture before the recent meeting 
of the Western New York Horticultural Society on 
his experience in growing and marketing peaches. 
Mr Lyman has about 1000 acres in this fruit. 

•84.-Llewellyn Smith, Buffalo. N. Y ..is a trav- 
eling salesman for the King Sewing Machine Com- 
pany of Buffalo. 

• 86 -Prof. George E. Stone lectured Jan. 23 
before the Boston Market Gardening Association at 
Belmont. 



. Hutchings has been recently appointed 
to the position of general manager of the Rochester 
Railway and Light Company. Mr. Hutchings grad- 
uated in 1889 and a few months later was made 
assistant to the expert in charge of installing an elec- 
tric lighting and power plant in Amherst. Before the 
work was completed he went to Germantown, Pa., to 
assist in the installation of the plant of the German- 
town Electric Light Co. A year later he resigned to 
become assistant superintendent of the West End 
Electric Co.. of Philadelphia. At that time he had 
been in the business less than fifteen months. He 
was made superintendent two years later and held the 
position until the electric companies in Philadelphia 
were consolidated, in 1896 or 1897. into what is now 
the Philadelphia Electric Company. Mr. Hutchings 
was made one of the electrical engineers of the con- 
solidated company, and was transferred to the main 
office In 1905 Mr. Hutchings went to Rochester. 
N. Y., as superintendent of the electrical department 
of the Rochester Railway and Light Company. He 
was promoted to the position of assistant general man- 
ager two years ago. 

•90.— H. D. Haskins of the Experiment Station 
addressed a farmers' institute at Ashfield, Jan. 23. 
on the subject, "Selection and Use of Commercial 
Fertilizers.'' 

'91.— E. P. Felt, State Entomologist of New 
York, gave a short course in entomology at the 
recently established School of Agriculture at St. 
Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y., the first week 
in February. 

'91.— M. A. Carpenter is in the vicinity of Phila- 
delphia for a few weeks superintending some pruning, 
etc for Olmsted & Olmsted, landscape architects. 
Carpenter and Brown were the only representatives of 
the class at the Boston alumni banquet. 

•91. —Henry M. Howard has been attending to the 
management of his sister's dairy farm in addition to 
his own market gardening business at West Newton. 
'92.— H. B. Emerson has severed his connection 
with the General Electric Co., and has accepted the 
position of Electrical Engineer and Master Mechanic 
of the Arlington Mills at Lawrence. Address P. 0. 
Box 472, Methuen. 



•94. _j. E. Gifford. President and General Man- 
ager of the Grange Co-operative Association, has 
been in town recently soliciting business for the 
association. 

'97. — Geo. D. Leavens is the author of an attrac- 
tive advertising pamphlet entitled "A Remarkable 
Fertilizer — Thomas Phosphate Powder and its Uses." 

'97. — Born in Greenwich, Conn., Dec. It, 1908, 
to Mr. and Mrs. George A. Drew, William Brooks 
Drew. 

'97.— P. H. Smith spoke Jan. 21 before the 
Connecticut State Dairymen's Association at Hart- 
ford, and Feb. 5, at Blandford. 

'02. — A. L. Dacy of Morgantown, W. Va.. gave 
two addresses at a recent meeting of the West Vir- 
ginia State Horticultural Society. One was on the 
subject "Harvesting and Marketing the Apple Crop." 
The other was an illustrated lecture on "Plant Dis- 
eases." Mr. Dacy was elected Secretary and 
Treasurer of the society for the coming year. 

'02. — Erratum — R. W. Morse has not started a 
publishing business in Fall River. He is business 
manager of the Fall River Publishing Co. The 



company has recently installed a photo engraving 
department. 

'04. — S. B. Haskell spoke at the meeting of the 
Worcester County Harvest Club, Feb. 3, at North 
Brookfield. 

'05.— Born, Jan. 16, at Bethel, N. H.,toMr. 
and Mrs. J. J. Gardner, a daughter, Christine 
Hannah. 

'05. — J. F. Lyman visited college a few days ago. 
He is a student in physiological chemistry at Yale 
Graduate School. 

'05. — A recent number of the Euening Register of 
Torrington, Conn., contains a long abstract from the 
annual report of Supt. W. B. Hatch setting forth the 
work done during 1908 on Hillside Cemetery. 

'05. — W. A. Munson has been engaged perma- 
nently as manager of the Bay Road Fruit Farm In 
South Amherst, and will also manage the fruit farm 
whicn Professor Waugn is going to start separately. 

'05. — W. M. Sears, 9 Helen St., Dorchester. 

'06. — C. E. Hood visited college last month. Mr. 
Hood has been engaged in the cotton-boll weevil 
investigations in the South. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



M. A. C. BANNERS, 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DEUEVS DRUG STOKE 







112 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

|. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAILOR ST»K'2 

II AMITY STREET. - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. TSLSMKttfl 54-4- 



C & K DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

■AIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabar's 31111, 

OU South Street, off Main. - NORTH A M .'TON, MASS 
Modern Improvements, Floe Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hump." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINK IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



INTER-COLI.KGIAI' 



k Bureau of Academic Costume 



College Caps and 601011s. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 

JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 

mttis( Douse Baitt Stop 

Four First Class Barbers 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 



Fancy Crackers, 



Confectionery and Fruit, 



Open Mondays from 7 a. m. to 8 i\ M. 
Tuesdays 7 " 6 " 

Wednesdays, 7 " 8 

Thursdays, 7 " 6 " 

Fridays, 7 " 8 

Saturdays, 7 " " " 




E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 ' Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE C0E-1BTIP1ER GOjIIPIUlY, 



it 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



2 4-26 Stone Street, 



NHW YORK. 




WRIGHT & DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

v ;v It is generally conceded 

^k that the clubs equipped 

\ by WRIOMT & MTSON j 

I have the best looking, 

I best fitting and moat 

I durable suits. 

The WRIOHT & DIT- 

;| SON SWEATERS rre 

/ easily the finest. Made 

1 fljf of choice worsted, well 

made, perfect fitting. 

' •* Nothing like one of our 

5* Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FKEF. 

WRIGHT «K? DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

iS WEST jam ST.. NEW VORK 
CHICAOO Providence, K. I. Cambridge, Mass. ; 






They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



E BALL- 
SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

K. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Hank, AMHERST 




CapsandGotons 






•SI Makers to 06, 07/08 Classes. 

Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and floods. 

COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Av , Nkw York. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Goivnecticul Valley Street Baiiwau Go. 

tMHKHHT division. 

Car* will leave A ...he. .t ai.d HortbSBipWB °»«W> »'«>»[ »» " 
half l*«,u?tr;.n»«3U A.M. till KUJOP.M. Sunday* the If* car 
will leave at MJA. J^^ Qmmw „^ Mass. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To »av< your sole. Come tou.e for > m,r 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

R.nalrliiK a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

opposite Town Hall. ___________ 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until ».M p m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour ami half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Sunt. 
Telephone 71-2 Atnlier*i. 

" Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1908. 



if. 



1909" COLLEGE MEN 

SHOULD CONSIDER THESE FACTS 

Pennsylvania is rapidly becoming the foremost High 
School State in the Union. Pennsylvania gives College 
Graduates life certificates of the highest grade after they 
£ 2 taught three years successfully A life cerate £ 
the best High School State in the Union w a valuable 

tunities for more in Pennsylvania and other States. 
THE TEACHERS' AGENCY, 
R. L. Myers & Co. 
ioi Market St., Harrisburg, Fa. 
, 545 Glenarm St., Denver, Colo. 
12-16 Trinity Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 



DENTAL! ROOMS, 



( ITI.ER'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. MASS 



"eThT^ickinbdn, d. d. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

. AMHERST, MASS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, • ' " nl,D * 

IIKFICK HOlTfM: 
9 TO 12 A. M-, ISO TO 6 P- **- 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered whende^red 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m , 

„„,! *v '4K p m The 5.38 p. m. connects 
expresB, and o.o» p- *• *»^» .. .. 

at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 

6.20 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J J. W. HANLEY, 

General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 



REMOVED 



From over Amherst Bakery to rear o Henry Fish - 
blocks down. Will be open and ready to do Cleaning 
Pressing, Altering, also cleans.ng of ! neck ties kid g ov es. 
etc Look up my ticket system for M. A. C- students. 

GERARD N. LEW, 

Ex. M. A. C, ii. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic Klock, near Depot, Open every Uay. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted for its excellent 

Oyster Stew ami Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 

W. W. BOYNTON, 

manufacturer or 

SODA WA.TEKS, 

I'ineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and liing-ei 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR, 

lias received the latest fabric* for the spring and summer 

trade of '07 in Gentlemen* Garment*. 41m doea Ladies' 

Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and PretMaBg promptly done. 

|__p-Milltary Work a Specialty. .__£_ 
Under the Post Otlicc, - - Amiikkst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUpto-Datt . 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICE8 AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



IV*. A. O. Ati't, 



C R.WISHII, •<»*» 



Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

refSATISFA.OTION OUARANTBED.*^ 

H. A. VThEV, manager. 

OFFICE : 

TFiajrt Pleasant Street. 

Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE STOKE. 



The Children are Happy. 
Because ttieir clothe* .<"• Bade on the Nf.w Home Pewino 
Machine, which fHct, aaaarei them of no ••rh>." Mother* 
should jret one at once as it will do for their children in yenrx 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



V 



.- 



I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without lending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 







DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



102 Main St., - 



^chillares 



L. H. TOURTKLOTTE. 

Arthur E. Dorr. u - 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., _ 

POULTRy'aND "GAME, PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 



BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts.. Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



A G. SPALDING & BROS. 

_ . . !_ it.. U7„.M 



The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 

r. n if Gymnasium 

Apparatus 



Uniform* 
for all 
Athletic 
Sports 



Official 

Implement* 

for all 

Track and 

Field Sports 

Soaldlnas handsomely illustrated catalogue of 
^.ll. port, contain* numerous suggestions 
^ Mailed free anywhere 

A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. 
73 Federal St., - - Boston ' 



Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

U2 Main Street, - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 




J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE 

AMHERST, MASS 
Telephone Connection, 

j.t-i.TROTT 

PUNDEl 8TEBB1 4 UBS FITTER, 

BUB DEHLEI 111 STOVES Ml BWSES. 



Shop 15 i-a North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 3°-'*- 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE AMHERST 

FORNITUREanu CARPET STORE 

A COMPLETE LINK OK GOODS 
SUITED TO THK STUDENTS* WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



• • • 



LEW 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

IS Pairs of Pants Pressed for J1.50. 



GERARD. N. LEW. 

PLEASANT ST., REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 

A PULL LINE OF 

Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave, cor. Ihth Street, 
NSW YORK. 

IMPORTERS AMI) MANUFACTURERS 09 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and Scientific Apparatus 

-A.SS-A-Y aoons. 

We handle the l>e*t of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smitb College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

Kuropean Plan, Rooms with Rath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. ROWKER & CO. 

CAKKNfft 4 AOtf HOUS*. 



tmte& 



AMHast , Aa$$, 






I 







THE 



-"> 



flftassacbusette 
1 HQvicultuval 

dolleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



i c-wrvR/r COURSES a» follows: 

ture and horticulture. 

™«™ TEAES' COTOSE, le.diug tc the degree of Bachelor of Scence. 

•2. A TOTJB TEARS CUU*»*. an( , M1(lemi( , B . Requ.red 

AdmiMiou granted on cert ficate from approve u g ^ ^.^ ^^ 

.tudie.duriugFreebm.u.udSopho^eye.^ U g Agri „„,ture, General Horti- 

ma , elect the major part of he.r wo,k. tourae Gardenillg , Botan,, Veterin- 

2JtfS?B355tf?**^^ "— - Mode "' L " nguagM ' 

C 7^ST ^»» COPSES leadlug to the degree, of Mae.er of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 10 



MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



AGRICULTURAL 



^ 



COLLEGE 



.1 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 24. 1909 



i 





We wo U ,d .ike a share of your patronage, we are reliab.e ^^£ 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know «*£. JVe 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, C»l Cloth.ng. 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO . . . 



page's $Doe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




KB^MILLET r l , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VlOIilH, BRHJO, WRWD0L1N, GUITAR STHlNGS. 

OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 y^rs, has built up a market >n 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 

best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Prem.er 

branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

I9 o Pearl St., - " Hartford, Conn. 



HURLER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Next to Post Office, _ 

Bringyour Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started » Ciraitatfal Ubwy. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 

COLLEGE~SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over too good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W, R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 24. 1909 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Coll.o. Sional. Amhs«st. Mass. Ths S.ohal will be 

X Wu "^ Um " "* dlacon,inu " nccis o^ered and arrears are paid. Subscriber, who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. ' ' -^ »«. .v 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 
O. B. BRICGS, 1 909. Business Manager. 
W. R. CLARKE, 1910. Assistant Editor. 
E. F. DAMON. 1910. Assistant Business Manager. 
£ - ^II ER ' l9 ° 9, C °" eee N0,M L C - BROWN. 1910. Athletic Notes. 

C ' H WHE 1909 A Y m M "r'T Mo, " £ BR °° KS " ' °" De P-"~ Notes. 

C. M. WHITE. 1909. Y. M. C. A. Notes. a. H. SHARPE. 1911. 

E. M. BROWN. 191 I. 



Terms, tt.OO per sear in adcance. 8 in a le Copies. IOe. Postage outside of United States and Canada, He extra. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket-Bail Association. 
Base Bail Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate. 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
R. H. Allen, Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke. Manager. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad, Pres. 
F. T. Haynes, Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 
•msimm v aasMsssSj, »w»u\» 



Edrtori&ls. 



The Signal Is pressed for space this issue and sev- 
eral items of interest as well as editorials on pertinent 
topics have been omitted. 



The Junior class wishes to express through these 
columns its appreciation of the work done by H. T. 
Cowles as chairman of the decorating committee. 



Rev. Donald McFayden of Amherst, who con- 
ducted a Bible class last term, is now regaining his 
health in Canada after a serious illness. We join 
*ith Mr. McFayden's many friends in Amherst in 
wishing him a full and speedy recovery. 



of that committee." The student committee on the 
field will appear before the committees on agriculture 
and ways and means at Boston a little later and 
again make the plea for the field. The progress of 
the bill will be watched with interest by the 
undergraduates. 



Athletic No-l*s. 



The athletic field is assured so far as the legisla- 
tive committee on agriculture is concerned. "The 
hearing given last Thursday evening" says President 
Butterfield, "made a big impression on the members 



The equipment of the gymnasium is being added 
to gradually. The most recent addition Is a scaling 
wall. 

The tennis court will be marked out in the Drill 
Hall soon and practice will commence at once. The 
manager will procure games as soon as the court is 
ready. 

At a meeting of the Track Team, L. S. Dickinson. 
'10, was elected captain ; R. S. Eddy, '10, manager; 
R. W. Piper and L. S- McNayr, '11, to run for 
assistant managership. 



' « 



I 



It4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"5 





College Not^ 



Absences are under the charge of the Dear, Instead 
of over-cut condition examinations a certain per cent, 
is now to be deducted from the student's rank accord^ 
ApetitionforlongerHbraryhoursisbeingcirculated ^ ^ ^^ changes are J-^ in he 

There Have been added to the library one hundr.dl^ , ting «^^»^ 

volumes of Everyman's Library. teams. Promotion * ^"^ are removed . 

The engagement of 0. M. Codding, '09, to M.ss wlthheld un nl all a student s conditions 
Edith Hub ey has been announced. I — — •— class. Tuesday, Feb. 



The following have left college: W. F Coash, C. 
A. Gunn, Ml; W. F. Hennessey, 12, D. b. 

Heatley, '12. 

W R Clarke, MO, Is seriously 111 with measles, 
bronchitis, and pneumonia at his home, Mllton-on- 
Hudson, New York. 

Mr. French, started Friday. Feb. 19 on a milk 
testing trip to Winchester, New Hampshire, for the 
Hatch Experiment Station. 

Measles have broken out around college Among 
,„e cases reported are : D. E. Ba.ley, 10. F. P. 
Nlckless. 'I0,J. B.Thomson, '09. 

The second anniversary assembly address was 
given by Rev. Clarence F. SwU. of Fall River. 



A. a meeting of the Senior class, Tuesday, Feb 
,6 ,n ,he Chapel, the officers were re-elected for fte 
second semester. They are : President, A. W 
H board of Sunderland; secretary, C. S Putnam o, 
Jefferson; treasurer, W. E. Oeer of Sprlngf.ld, 
u p Trosbv of Lenox; 5. at A., r . n. 
X:o,Nlan,;htsL,an,O.B.Br,ggso.Crea, 

Bangton. The class voted, that a committee o 
I X elected, one member b, each fa"-** 
one b, the non-fraternity men, to nominate com- 
lencement speakers and to report such nominees to 
be voted on by the class separately. 

The following committees have been chosen : Caps 
a „d gowns. A. H. Hubbard and C. S. Putnam ; pro- 
grams and invitations. H. W. Turner and M. 1 



a committee 'of the class in floriculture ; auditing 
Treasurer F. C. Kenney, H. J. Neale, E F. Ha* 
ZT 1, was voted to wear caps and gowns to 
Chapel, only during the two weeks preceding senior 
exams. 



Feb 



„r :X. "e' F"sw,„'o. Fall Rfver . £^£ ^^ . ,. Caffrey, T. C. Waters. 
Cnely.Feh. ,7, In the Chape,. He spoke ^]?&,l-~ ■tj^,--* 

"Lincoln, the Master. 

The vesper services Sunday. Feb. 14. were con- 
ducted by President Harris of Amherst College on 

he subject -Progress." He based his talk on 

Paul's words to Timothy, "Let thy progress appear 

unto all." 

The Sophomores elected officers Feb. 18, for the 

.-, Thev are • H. W. Blaney, presi- 
ensuing semester. They are . n j 

■W- P W. Pickard, vice-president; L. M. Jonn 
son secretary and treasurer; A. P. Bursley. his- 
;i A. H. Sharpe, captain; R. C. Barrows, 
sergeant at arms. 

H W French. '10, who was recently elected 

resident of the New England Federation of Agricul- 

tura Colleges, will represent that organization m the 

New England Conference of Rural Progress at Boston. 

MaTch 4 and 5. Mr. French will speak on '•Corn 

a7d Fruit Judging Contests" from the standpoint o 

agricultural students. He expects also to have a 

meeting of the federation on March 4 



By direction of the faculty a new book of rules has 
been published. Several changes are to be noticed. | 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

25 _Y. M. C. A.. 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
Debating Club, 7-45 p. m. In Chapel. 
Feb. 26.-"College Night." Supper and Speaking in 

Draper Hall. 
Feb. 27.-lce Hockey, 3-00 p. m.. Trinity on the 
college pond. 
Union entertainment, 6-30 P. m. in 

Chapel. Mr. Pitt Parker. 
Basketball, Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute at Drill Hall. 
Feb 28.-Bible Study. 4-00 p. m. In Chapel 

Vespers, 5-00 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker. 
Mr Carl Hamilton, Andover. 
March 2.-Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p. m. in Agricul- 
ture Room. 



March 3.— Assembly, 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. 
Speaker, Hon. F. H. Jackson, Prov- 
idence, R. I. 
March 4. — Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 

Debating Club. 7-45 In Chapel. 
March 6. — Union entertainment, 6-30 p. m. in 
Chapel. Speaker. Mr. W. S. Spencer. 
March 7. — Bible Study, 4-00 p. m. in Chapel. 

Vespers, 5-00 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, 
Mr. W. E. Tinker, New York- 
March 9. — Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p. m. In Agricul- 
ture Room. 
March 10. — Assembly. 1-30 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, 
Prof. W. T. Sedgwick of M. I. T. 



THE JUNIOR "PROM." 

The greatest social event of the season, the 
Junior Promenade was held in the drill hall Feb. 12. 
The students attended in large numbers and there 
were many alumni present. The hall presented a 
very artistic appearance. The walls were covered 
with evergreens and across the north end was hung a 
heavy curtain of the same with an arch in the center. 
The cozy corners were arranged behind this and also 
under the balcony at the south end of the hall. On 
the west side of the hall was a large portrait of Lincoln 
surrounded by American flags, in honor of his 100th 
anniversary. On the east side were displayed college 
banners. Red, white, and blue bunting covered the 
ceiling and the light in the center was decorated with 
streamers. Palms and ferns from the college green- 
houses were used to embank the orchestra. A large 
calcium light in the balcony produced very pretty 
light effects. 

In the reception which preceded the dance the 
patronessess who received were: Mr. Kenyon L. 
Buterfield, Mrs. William P. Brooks, Mrs. Philip B. 
Hasbrouck. Mrs. Frank A. Waugh, Mrs. Edwin A. 
White, Mrs. A. Vincent Osmun. The committee in 
charge was Ralph A. Waldron of Hyde Park.chairman, 
Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck, Prof. E. A. White, William 
E.Leonard of Belmont, Edwin H. Turner of Reading, 
Louis Brandt of Everett, Lawrence S. Dickinson of 
Amherst, George W. Paulsen of New York City, 
Frank T. Haynes of Sturbridge and Henry T. Cowles 
of Worcester. Music was furnished by Derrick's 
orchestra of Westfield. A concert program was 



played during the reception. There were 28 numbers 
on the program. Dancing began at 9-15 p. m. and 
ended at 4-00 a. m. Brown of Amherst catered. 

Those present were : Myron W. Thompson, '09, 
and Miss Kneeland of Mt. Holyoke college; George 
M. Codding, '09, and Miss Edith Hubley of Amherst, 
L. S. Corbett. '09, and Miss Campbell of Boston; 
Samuel S. Crossman. *09, and Miss Pauline Haskell 
of Smith College ; Richard C. Potter, '09, and Miss 
Bertha Bodwell of Smith College ; Charles R. Webb, 
'09. and Miss Ina Carlow of Worcester; John 
Noyes, '09, and Miss Helen R. Morrison of Amherst ; 
Gordon R. Fulton, '09, and Miss Vera L. Billings 
of Springfield; Harold J. Neale, '09, and Miss 
Dorothy Whitmore of Worcester; E. F. Hatha- 
way, '09, and Miss Edna Moore of Watertown; Dr. 
and Mrs. McLaurin of Amherst; Mr. and Mrs. Philip 
H. Smith, '97, of Amherst; F. A. Cutter. '07, and 
Miss Margaret Lee of Amherst ; R. H. Verbeck, '08, 
and Miss Streeter of Mt. Holyoke College ; Professor 
and Mrs. A. V. Osmun, '03, of Amherst; William 
J. Coleman. '08, and Miss Mae E. Dawson of 
Springfield; W. J. Regan, '08, and Miss Clarke of 
Springfield; E. F. Damon, '10. and Miss Elsa Luick 
of Dorchester; Lawrence S. Dickinson, '10, and 
Miss Edith Morgan of Amherst ;Sumner C. Brooks, 
'10, and Miss Mary Harwood of Smith College; H.A. 
Brooks, '10. and Miss Ruth MacGregor of Mt. Hol- 
yoke College ; W. S. Titus. '10, and Miss Margaret 
Burleigh of Smith College; F. H. Partridge. '10. 
and Miss Ruth Seaver of Mt. Holyoke; Ralph A. 
Waldron, '10. and Miss Helen Hatch of Hyde Park; 
E. H. Turner, '10, and Miss Helen R. Abbott of 
Reading; Fred P. Nickless, '10. and Miss Gertrude 
Mason of Billerica; Louis Brandt, '10, and Miss 
Mary E. Caldwell of Amherst; R. H. Allen, '10, and 
Mrs. John Nash of Amherst ; John P. Blaney, '10 
and Miss Florence I. Bulfinch of Swampscott ; John 
G. Everson, '10, and Miss Edna T. Harvey of 
Springfield ; Frank A. Prouty, '10, and Miss Mabelle 
E. Williams of Amherst; William E. Leonard, '10, 
and Miss Anna G. Obermeyer of Springfield; Frank 
S. Thomas, '10, and Miss Marjorie Jackson of Athol ; 
J. C. Bailey, '10, and Miss Pauline L. May of 
Mt. Holyoke; Lyman G. Schermerhorn, '10, and 
Miss Lillian E. Tolman of Springfield ; R. G. Eddy, 
'10, and Miss Evelyn Martin of Sharon ; Frank T. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



116 

: r ^wumtv THIRD ANNUAL REUNION 

^^^^^ T ^\ N ™^s AN A CR1 cu LTU - Collece 

College ; L. 0. Stevenson, ' 1 1 and Mis, K f henn. The £ ^ -m. ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Chapin of Chapin school ; E. A. Larrabee 11, a ^ ^ , 908 

Miss Lillian Larrabee of Winthrop ; C. A. Lodge, ^^ 

• 11 and Miss Mabel W. Lodge of Manchester ; n. dose of a very , n _ 

° •"-?.•"• ^ ,"£2. Tan" djk'S^ i~ - — *- * 
Holyoke College ; W. F. Hennessey, , loration rea d the following poem: 

^ *e °a— T mmmm gave ,n,orma>| Th .„ > a - — «... .V. -.-««; 



receptions. On "the da, after" all went for sleigh, 
rldes some in parties, to many of the surround.ng 
towns. 



HEARING ON ATHLETIC FIELD 

The legislative committee on agriculture held a 
hearing at the Amherst House, Thursday evening, 
Feb 18. The trustees were represented by Mr. 
Preston, the faculty by President Butterfield and Dr. 
Reynolds, the alumni by Professor Brooks and Dr. 
Lmdsey, and the student body by H W Turner 0. 
B Briggs, C. H. White. H. L. White. 0. C. Bart 
leu, and P. E. Alger. Messrs Turner Br.ggs, C. 
H White, and H. L. White presented briefly the 
need of an athletic field and wer3 questioned reely 
by the committee. The speakers brought out the 
facts that with the exception of Rhode Island and 

Connecticut, other New England state ^^ l<mw — „ . 

athletic fields; that an enclosed field would serve as orr ^^ ^^ ^ ^ there „ 

a strong inducement to students to consider M. A. C. fol >° W,ng a t tne fa ces of those whom we 

"preference to other technical colleges that ga ^ aga »« a vacan^a g ^^ {q ^ q{ tnese 
receipts would make possible larger guarantees ^VT^^ m 8 Lte ut. Totten is not here to say 
would bring teams of larger colleges ^^^^^f^. his cordial handsnake, pleasant 
I C Dr. Reynolds brought out the nece s sity f P esent anu g ^ ^ ^ 

not only an athletic field but a play-ground <°' H*™ le ™ ichee y w w Aggie , ti5 

lie student body, and for a larger student bod, A «■££"* ^ here tonight to give an 
than now. President Butterfield tersely _i . *uhmjny P £ - _ ^ 



I nere ib a in»" >-- ., 

Who wants to send us old chaps all to-well. 
When we reach sixty, or about that age. 
Incontinently march us off the stage. 

Now 1 for one. don't think thafs playing fair 
To force a man to climb the golden stair 
Whether he will or no. It makes me sick 
To think I've reached my grand climacteric. 

Now. this man. Osier, born in "49. 

According to "Who's Who?" is 59; 

Another year, unless the cuss should die. 

Wet make him narcb.-or know the reason why. 

No w William Osier. Billy Osier. rise- 
Listen, attend, and we will put you wise ; 
Your latest cult we frown upon, despise ; 
So. good-bye. Bill, good-bye.-and blast your eyes ! 

Chorus 

So good-bye. Bill, we won't be Oslerized ; 
So good-bye. Bill, we want this emphasized: 
That though we -act like sixty." we're alive. 
And we'll be on the deck when you arrive. 

Totten Memorial: Mr. Lublin presented the 

, n :„„ *v,ic «Aor there is 



Z arguments cl the speakers and reiterated the 
words ol Dr. Reynolds, declaring that M. A. C. mus 
ta» what other colleges have, and that she cannot 



not wiuim inj f - . ..y, 

extended review of his life nor to frame any eulogy 
"solutions, but to say a few kindly home ly ; wor 
about a man we loved. Charles A. L. Totten was 




have what other colleges have, and that she cann « «^' ™ , 85l at New Londo n. Conn., graduate* 
bold her own because she has "no ^. tatl °" n I ^ ^ College. Hartford, 1869 and from West 
tr ack athletics. The sense of the meet.ng ~*1^«JK Academy 1873, commissioned 2na 
favor of the field. P Lieutenant 1873 and 1st Lieutenant 1874 Pro- 

The committee, consist.ng of O. C. Bartlett, r-. u Tactics M A c l875 

E Alger, and R. S. Eddy will represent the^-^M.1^ ^ ^ , 

gr adua 8 tes at further legislative committee heannga -18 ^^ te rw ^ ^ ^ 

on the $ 1 5.000 athletic field appropriation MB. | Professor 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



««7 



Yale 1889-1892. During the latter years of his life 
he devoted his attention to biblical investigation and 
died in March 1908. " Massachusetts Aggie" is 
particularly indebted to him for the building of the fort 
and the magazine and for the fact that he was the 
only instructor who took the Cadets into camp at Mt. 
Toby. He was an able and clever man, a thorough 
instructor, whose bent was always toward progress. 
To the elect he was in addition a loyal loving friend. 
No longer panegyric is necessary at our Reunion, 
upon one who has helped by advice and instruction to 
train men fitly for their struggle through life. His 
was a personality that will always linger lovingly in our 
recollections. Charles A. L. Totten! 

Charles A. L. Totten! " Missjnc! " 

Captain Henry W. Turnkr, '09: The foot-ball 
season has been a success; three games won, three 
games lost and three games tied. The success not 
due to material, but to the work and spirit of the 
coach and players; the student body helping on the 
side lines. Athletics have advertised the college and 
have helped it to grow j both are growing. We need 
an athletic field ; it would give the students more 
home games, and also help to financially support the 
association. We have outgrown the present accom- 
modations ; why not get what is much needed? 

Exhibit of writings hastily gathered : Samuel T. 
Maynard, 72 ; The Small Country Place, Lippin- 
cott. William P. Brooks, Ph. D., '75: Manures, 
Fertilizers &. Farm Crops; Animal Husbandry; Soils 
and How to Treat Them ; The Home Correspondence 
School, Springfield. Dr. John P. Winchester, '75 : 
Reminiscences of Bovine Tuberculosis in Massa- 
chusetts (Reprint). Dr. Henry E. Chapin, '81 : and 
Louis J. Rettger, M. A.: Elementary Zoology and 
Laboratory Guide, G. P. Englehard & Co. Dr. John 
A. Cutter, '82 and E. Cutter. M. D., Yale, '52: 
Food : Its Relation to Health and Disease, The 
Gazette Publishing Company, New York. Herbert 
Myrick, '82 : How to Co-operate ; Turkeys and How 
to Grow Them; The American Sugar Industry; The 
Promise of Life \ Cache La Poudre ; A Swim for 
Life; with J. B. Killebrew — Tobacco Leaf; with 
many specialists— The Book of Corn. All Orange 
Judd Company. Charles S. Plumb, '82 : Indian 
Com Culture, Breeder's Gazette Print. Types and 
Breeds of Farm Animals, Ginn & Company. Little 



Sketches of Famous Beef Cattle, Author. Frederick 
H. Fowler, '87 : Early Agricultural Education in 
Massachusetts; Library Catalogue State Board of 
Agriculture of Massachusetts ; Agriculture of Massa- 
chusetts ; all Mass. State Board of Agriculture. 
Frederick H. Read, '94: Business: Bookkeeping, 
Business Arithmetic and English. Home Correspond- 
ence School, Springfield. H. D. Hemenway, '95 : 
How to Make School Gardens, Doubleday, Page & 
Company , Hints and Helps for Young Gardeners, 
Author; also Nature Leaflets on Seeds, Window 
Gardening, Hotbeds and How to Plant : Mass. State 
Board of Agriculture. Dr. Edward A. White, '95 : A 
Preliminary Report on the Hymeniales of Con- 
necticut; Conn. Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey. George D. Leavens, '97: Tobacco and its 
Fertilization; Thomas Phosphate Powder (Basic 
Slag Phosphate) and its Uses, Coe-Mortimer Com- 
pany; A Discussion of Methods for Determining the 
Availability of Phosphoric Acid in Thomas Phosphate 
Powder. Dr. Warren E. Hinds, '99: The Grass 
Thrips (M. A. C.) ; Some Factors in the Natural 
Control of the Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil ; Prolife- 
ration as a Factor in the Natural Control of the 
Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture ; The First and Last Essential Steps In Com- 
bating the Boll Weevil, (Reprint); with W. D. 
Hunter, Bulletins 45 and 51, U. S. Dept. Agri- 
culture. 

Officers Elected: President, Alfred W. Lublin, 
'84, manufacturer and bibliophile; Vice-President, 
Henry E. Chapin, Sc. D., '81, biologist and teacher 
of biology; 2nd Vice-President, Walter L. Morse, '95, 
Terminal Engineer, Grand Central Improvements; 
3rd Vice-President, Fred. A. Cutter, '07, former 
foot-ball captain and present tree surgeon and biolo- 
gist ; Chomgus, Sandford D. Foot, '78, manufac- 
turer; Treasurer, Alvan L. Fowler, '80, National 
Bank receiver; Secretary, John A. Cutter, M. D., 
'82. 

The 24th Annual Reunion will be held December 3, 
1909, at the Hotel St. Denis. 

The Secretary. 
25 1 West 8 1 st Street , New York, Dec. 30, 1 908. 






'71. — A. B. Norcross of Monson is State Senator 
from the Hampshire and Hampden district. 










n8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




I individuals differs ; but above all things, a man s 
DEBATING CLUB. ^ ^ be man , y , n the second p , aC e. the- 

The first regular program of the Debating Club was K » ^ ^ ^ a ^^ man shoul d be 

carried out Thursday evening, Feb. 11. The topic w ^^ ^^ ind , vidual ls the prevalent idea, 
of debate was : "Resolved, That coeducation in he ^ ^ ^ a ^^ man should be energet ic, 
higher institutions of learning is preferable to tn , viru i e nt, broad-minded and joyous, 
segregation of the sexes." The speakers were: for ^ ^ ^ ^ men in history ? They are 
the affirmative, Briggs, '09. and Southwlck, » 2 M men w , th a consciousness f a higher compelling pur- 
for the negative, Folsom, MO, and Baird, 12. The ^ do chrlst , s teachlngs oCCupy in a 

judges were: Brown, Smulyan and C H. White, > ^ ? By revealing God's truths, they g.ve 

. 09 . The decision was in favor of the affi^rmatwe. purposeS) and th Detter 

A meeting of the Debating Club was held Thus- hg thes6) the stronger manhew.ll 

dav Feb. 18, In the Chapel. After a short busi- h 

ness meeting a debate was held on the following be. 

subject- "Resolved. That the United States gov- al Secretary Bardwell of the Northampton Y 

ernment should establish a P-els post." The I -~ - — - — 

speakers on the affirmative were Smulyan 09, and 

Clapp M2, while Cardin, '09, and Ostralenk.il. 

upheld the negative. The judges. Potter. '09. 



MCA addressed the meeting on Thursday even- 
in, Feb. 18. taking for his talk, "The Positive 
.Side of Sin." He said in part :-We sometimes 

^heo- the negative. The judges. Potter '09. ^ ^ eyes> shutting God out f our -live.. 

Putnam '09, and Folsom. '10, awarded the decis- ■ ? dose their eyes to the better things. 

ion to the affirmative by a score of twenty out of! 



f a score of twenty out of ^ not have them force d upon themseive 

possible thirty-two. The club has decided to I ^ not fQrce Hlmself on us . But to possess 
obtain copies of Cushing's Manual for the use o 



members. 

Prof 1 A. Foo~rd addressed on Thursday, Feb. 
18 a farmers' institute held at Hadley under the 
asspices of the Hampshire and Three Counties 
Agricultural Societies. His subject was "Alfalfa 
and Other Forage Crops." ^ === = 



y. MX- A - N°*« s - 



.. meeting Thursday evening, Jan. 
„ was addressed by Mr. Norris. Yale '08. now 
„eral secretary of .he Y. M C. A. a, Ambers 
college. Mr. Norris spoke on the sub|eot, "What 

Is Religion." 

'•Religion," said Mr. Norris. "is the conscious- 
ness of a higher compelling purpose. It commands 
a man's conduct. Carlyle says '^ ni , st ^ 
soul of practice, the primary vital part of life. AH 
races and all men have a religion. If a man says 
there is no God; that is his religion. 

There are a number of mistaken ideas In regard to 
religion. First, the expression of religion is taken 
for the thing itself. Singing and worshipping is no 
essentially religion. The religious expression of 



uoa wm uui iviiw- — - i_i_i„ 

ourselves to the fullest extent, we must have the Holy 
Spirit in some measure. It is through ignorance that 
ridicule of religious feeling comes. The scoffers are 
blind They cannot understand when we try to reason 
with 'them. No one can live for himself alone. 
There are demands on him for service to others. 
So each man must be ready to help in everyway 
possible, to take part in the intellectual and moral up- 
lift We are bound to have urgent demands upon us 
as 'we grow older. Great things will come into our 
lives. To be of greatest usefulness, we must share 
our lives with Christ. The drunkard's taste is dulled 
by his excesses. Dissipation and wrong doing unfits 
everyone for the best life. Christ's influence make 
life more refined and efficient. To Him alone re 
due the refining and ennobling influences of U£ 
One can be self-satisfied without him, but cannot live 
the fullest life. 



BIBLE STUDY. 

The spring courses in Bible Study began Sun- 
day Feb 21. At the present writing a thorough 
canvass for enrollment, not yet quite completed is m 
progress among the students and the names of those 
already entered in classes show that at least seventy 



119 



be engaged in the present 



men of the college will 
courses in Bible study. 

Professor Hart will continue his course on "The 
Characters of the Old Testament." Mr. McKimmle 
will also continue his course on "The Life of Paul." 
One entirely new course on the life of Christ will be 
introduced. The text adopted for this course is 
George B. Stewart's Study of the Life of Jesus. 
The groups following this course will be led by C. H. 
White and G.M.Brown, both '09. Groups continuing 
with Dean Bosworth's Studies in the Life of Jesus 
Christ, but taking up different sections of the book 
than were followed last term, will be led by Ralph J. 
Watts, '07. H. L. White, '09 and Frank L. Haynes, 
'10. 

The Wednesday evening group, which proved one 
of the most flourishing groups of last term during the 
time that it lasted, but which was abandoned because 
of the illness, still continuing, of its leader, Rev. 
Donald McFayden of Amherst, will start anew this 
term. The ability, Interest and enthusiastic spirit 
shown by Mr. McFayden in conducting this course 
was much appreciated by the students of the grouD, 
and it is hoped that he may be able to continue 
the work among us at some future date. 

The present courses will not last over eight weeks. 
It is our aim to pursue, during this short time, an 
earnest, vigorous study of the Bible, such as will aid 
and prepare us to overcome the usual summer inertia 
with respect to religious matters, and will fit us to 
carry on the work with added zest and spirit next fall. 
The continued support of all those interested can 
alone lead to a realization of this purpose. 




AGRICULTURE. 

The Hampshire and the Three Counties agricul- 
tural societies held a joint farmers' institute at Hadley 
Feb. 18. Prof. J. A. Foord spoke for the Hamp- 
shire society at 10-30 on "Alfalfa and other forage 
crops." In the afternoon P. M. Harwood, 75, 
general agent of the Massachusetts state bureau, 
spoke for the Three Counties Society on "Dairying." 
ENGLISH. 

Mrs. Milford H. Clark of Sunderland has recently 



given to the library a large number of Aggie Life and 
College Signals and also some agricultural reports. 

With the $100.00 appropriated last year for the 
improvement of the Reading Room, 90 volumes of 
Every Man's Library have been purchased and will 
soon be placed in that room. The works of Henry 
Van Dyke and also a book on the American Govern- 
ment have been placed in the reading room. For the 
aid of the Debating Club and those persons seeking for 
essay materials, the librarian has set aside the bound 
volumes of "Forum" and an index for the same. 

MILITARY 

Thursday, Feb. I 1 , 25 students met in the chapel 
in response to a call by Captain Martin and voted to 
form a Rifle Club in connection with the National 
Rifle Association. The object of this organization is 
to encourage marksmanship among the students. A 
team consisting of ten men will compete in the Indoor 
match during the month of March for the Intercol- 
legiate trophy. This trophy was won last year by 
Columbia University and it well become the property 
of the club winning it three times. All members of 
the college and faculty are eligible for membership, 
but students without condition only can belong to the 
rifle team. In the spring matches will be held on the 
long ranges and a team will compete for the intercol- 
legiate trophy. The following officers have been 
elected : President, George Paulsen, '10 ; vice-presi- 
dent, H. A. Brooks, '10; secretary, A. H. Sharpe, 
'11; treasurer", J. C. Bailey, '10. 

PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY 

The research division of the department Is still 
pursuing its studies on the constitution of butter-fat 
and attempting to perfect methods whereby the 
various fats entering into the butter-fat molecule can 
be determined quantitatively. Considerable progress 
has been made, but further work will have to be done 
before reasonable success is attained. The fertilizer 
division is at present engaged in studying the com- 
position of soils taken from cranberry bogs in the 
southeastern part of the state. This work Is carried 
on in cooperation with experiments conducted by the 
agricultural division of the station in studying fertilizer 
requirements of the cranberry. 



& 






120 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i a i 



— ~~~ Z ~ At > I i<.„ e trustees M F. Dickinson. George H. Ellis and 

m. i amM Howard has taken the position made lege trustees m. r. 

Mr. James Howara nas * William H. Bowker. 

vacant by the resignation of W. tx. t-tepouni * 
va 7 . -.- i.: ♦!,<» u/int^r Others D 



at present canvassing the state, making the winter 
collection of concentrated feed stuffs. These feeds 
are being examined as rapidly as circumstances will 

permit. 

Builentin 138 on the inspection of cattle feeds is 
now being distributed. A large number ot applica- 
tions have lately been received for the testing of cows. 
Considerable difficulty has been experienced in secur- 
ing men for this purpose. The station has tempor- 
arily in its employ three graduates of the Short Course 
of New Hampshire Agricultural College. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Whereas. It hath pleased God in His infinite wisdom to take 
unto Himself the father of our beloved classmate. Robert D. 

LU LoW. That we. the members of the class of Nineteen 
Hundred and Nine do extend to him and his family our heart- 
felt sympathy in thistheir hour of sorrow ; and be H further 
LaW.Thataco'pyof these relations be sent to our 
bereaved classmate, that a copy be filed in the records of the 
class and that a copy be published in the College S.gnal. 
Myron W. Thompson. \ 
Henry W. Turner, V For the Class. 
George M. Brown. J 
Whereas. It hath pleased God in His infinite wisdom to take 
unto himself the father of our beloved friend and brother 
Robert D. Lull ; be it 

Resolved. That we,the members of Phi S.gma Kappa do 
extend to him and his family our sincere sympathy in this, 
their hour of sorrow ; and be it further 

Resold. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to he 
bereaved family, that a copy be filed in the records of the 
fraternity and that a copy be published in the College S.gnal. 
E. Farnham Damon. ) 
Park W. Allen. > For tne Fraternity. 

Dwioht Cabot. i 



Alumni. 



Others present were: Madison Bunker. '75 ; C. W. 
McConnell, ex-76; Atherton Clark. 77; Austin 
Peters, '81; W.A.Morse. F. G. May, 82 ; E. S. 
Jones, H. A. Putnam, N. N.Jones, ex- 82; S. M. 
Holman, '83 ; C. S. Cutter. ex-'85; R. B Macin- 
tosh '86- E. F. Richardson, F. H. Fowler. 87; 
R P Sellew. '89; M. A. Carpenter. W. A. Brown, 
-91 • F G Baldus, G. B. Willard. E. Rogers. '92; 
F C. Smith, '93; A. H. Cutter, J. E. Gilford, L. 
Manley '94; N. Shultis, E. W. Poole. '96; H. 
W. Dana. B. H. Smith, '99; R. D. Gilbert. '00. 
E. B. Saunders, '02 ; B. Tupper, A. N. Swain, 05 ; 
R W Peakes. '06; J. F. Eastman. C. King, 07; 
J. Daniels, C. L. Flint, S. L. Davenport, T. F. 

Waugh. '08. 

At the election of officers Franklin W. Dav.s, 89. 
was re-elected president and William A. Morse, *82. 
treasurer, while H. W. Dana. '99, was elected sec- 
retary in the place of N. Shultis. F. G. May, 82, 
R. B. Mackintosh. '86. and B. Tupper, '05. were 

made directors. 

President Davis urged upon the alumni the need 
of enthusiastically standing by the college and of turn- 
ing out well at alumni gatherings, saying at the same 
time that the ones who really needed the urging were 
not there to hear his plea. 

In introducing President Butterfield who was the 
chief speaker of the evening, Mr. Davis commented 
on President Roosevelt's methods of solving prob- 
lems He could pick up a big stick against the Till- 
man pitchfork or hurl a message at Congress, but 
when he came to the rural problems, the conditions 
could best be met by a Commission on Country Life 
and MAC. was honored in that its president had 
been selected as one member of this commission. 
Some rural problems had been well settled by the 
people themselves. This was especially true of the 
proper training of automobilists. Some rural com- 
munities had done marvellously in this respect. Of 
one such town it had been said that its coat of arms 
should be "an autoist rampant; a sheriff couchant 
and a justice expectant." 

-The Commission on Country Life," 



BOSTON ALUMNI DINNER. 

Among those present at the Boston alumni dinner 

were: ... _ 

At the head table: President Franklin W. Davis, 
'89 of the club; President Kenyon L. Butterfield of 
the' college; Secretary J.Lewis Ellsworth of the. ". « - ~- ~— — - ■ rampant 

Board of Agriculture; *^— /" £ ™ fe^JTln n»i cases couchant. while 
of Amherst; Representative Josephs. Gates, coi |iww g 



President Roosevelt has been expectant. And in the 
end, by the aid of the commission and the agricul- 
tural colleges the country life shall be triumphant." 

The speaker then presented President Butterfield 
as a member of President Roosevelt's Commission 
on Country Life. 

President Butterfield said he had much rather be 
introduced as the president of the college, and after 
the alumni gave a round of cheers — the old 
"A-g-g-i-e," and the "Mass-Mass-Mass-chusetts" 
of today — he told interestingly of his experiences with 
the commission on the trip of "Roosevelt's night- 
riders." 

Wherever they went, he said, their real purpose 
once understood, the commission received a hearty 
welcome, and nowhere more so than in the south. 
Here the country had just returned to the economic 
position it had held before the civil war. Many of 
the farmers were so poor that they had constantly to 
mortgage their crops in advance to obtain the money 
for their common wants of life, and thus, when the 
crop matured they were obliged to sell it for whatever 
it would bring. 

It was a bad sign, he thought, that in the west 
many farmers, after succeeding on good farms, 
moved away to spend their money or to make more 
elsewhere. What was wanted was a farming popu- 
lation that would stay and work their farms. The 
two wants, then, were first a scheme of agriculture 
that was fairly profitable and then a kind of society 
that was satisfactory and permanent. The thing that 
all agreed on was that more and better education 
must be had ; the country schools must be made dif- 
ferent and more practical, and if the farmer did not 
come to the schools the schools must be taken to 
the farmer. 

The President outlined the now well known plans 
for the athletic field. 

Then the alumni made suggestions and finally 
adopted resolutions urging upon the members of the 
legislature the needs of the college and of the athletic 
field. 

Secretary Ellis was the next speaker and was fol- 
lowed by Representatives Hosmer and Gates who 
were both enthusiastic for the college. 

Other speakers called on were Dr. Peters, '81; 
E. F. Richardson, '87, Norfolk county commissioner ; 



and John E. Gifford, '95. overseer ot the state 
grange. G.A.Parker. '76, of the Hartford. Conn, park 
department had been delayed in his journey but said 
he was bound to come in any way and arrived in time 
to be welcomed and say a word in return. 



ALUMNI MEET IN WASHINGTON. 

Sixteen members of the M. A. C. Club of Wash- 
ington spent a very enjoyable evening in the banquet 
hall of the Y. M. C. A. building on Feb. 13, on the 
occasion of the annual dinner and reunion of the Club. 
They are particularly favored in having with them, as 
a representative of the faculty, Dr. H. T. Fernald 
whose account of what is going on in the College was 
not only interesting, but conducive to a greater pride 
and loyalty for their Alma Mater. The custom 
recently inaugurated of sending faculty representatives 
to the meetings of the alumni, is resulting in a greater 
enthusiasm for their success, and this is particularly 
true in the case of the Washington Club wnich is still 
small in numbers, and where considerable effort is 
always necessary to secure a representative attend- 
ance. Both Dr. Allen, to whose efforts the Club 
owes its existence, and the President for 1908, C. S. 
Crocker of Philadelphia, were forced to absent them- 
selves from the meeting this year because of illness, 
and they were greatly missed. For the first time 
since its organization, but a single out-of-town alum- 
nus was present. It is hoped that this state of 
affairs will not be repeated. The Washington Ciub 
from its organization, has expected to recruit itself 
from the entire eastern section of the country south of 
New York. Alumni living in Baltimore, Richmond, 
Philadelphia, and other near-by cities may attend 
these meetings at little expense, and with the loss of 
little time. For their benefit, it is always planned to 
hold the meetings on Saturday evenings. A glance 
at the list of those in attendance will show that grad- 
uates of recent classes are in a great majority. 

The list of speakers and their subjects was as fol- 
lows: Dr. H. T. Fernald, "News from Home"; W. 
H. Beal, "The M. A. C. Man by Adoption" ; G. A. 
Billings, '95, "The M. A. C. Man in Agriculture" ; 
C. B. Lane, '95, "The M. A. C. Man in Dairying"; 
A. F. Burgess, '95, "The M. A. C. Man in Ento- 
mology"; J. W. Keilogg, '00, "The M. A. C. 
Man in Chemistry"; H. M. White, '04. "The M. 



1 i 






• 












122 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



A C Man in Horticulture"; J. A. Hyslop, '08, 
-Our Freshmen Alumni". H. L. Knight, '02. 
acted as Toastmaster in the absence of the President 
of the Club. Besides those already mentioned there 
were present, W. A. Hooker, '99; E. W. Morse, 
ex '87- F D. Couden, C. H. Griffin and F. F. Hen- 
shaw, ''04; C. E. Hood, '06; H. P.Wood, '07; 
and Carleton Bates, '08. 

For the ensuing year, the following officers were 
elected: President, A. F. Burgess; Vlce-Pres.dents 
G A. Billings and J. W. Kellogg; Secretary and 
Treasurer, F. D. Couden; Choragus, C. H. Gnff.n. 
It was suggested that at the next meeting, the 
wives of members be invited to participate. After 
some discussion the matter was referred to the Exec- 
utive Committee and an exciting debate may be pre- 
dicted on the occasion of the next session of that 
body. The time and place of the next meeting will 
also be announced by that Committee. 

A meeting of the executive committee of the Asso- 
ciate Alumni was held last Thursday evening, and 
plans for commencement were discussed. 

'81 — Dr Austin Peters was in Amherst last week 
for the purpose of attending the alumni committee 

meeting. 

. 83 __S M. Holman of Attleboro is serving his 
third term in the Massachusetts House of Represen- 
tatives. 

-85 —E W. Allen was taken very sick with rheu- 
matic' fever after his return from the journey of the 
Country Life Commission. He has been confined to 
his home in Washington and is convalescing slowly. 

'90 — H D. Haskins spoke on the evening of Feb. 
9 before the Men's Club at Southwick. Mr. Has- 
kins has been seriously ill for several days. 

.97 _p H Smith will lecture before the Milk 
Consumers'' League in Springfield. Feb 26, on the 
Food Value of Milk, and before the Milk Inspectors 
Association in Boston, March 10. en a sim.lar 

subject. 

'06— L H Moseley was at college recently. 

'06-Born, Jan. 15, to Mr. and Mrs. William W. 
Colton of Dalton. a daughter. Thelma Colton. 

>07. _F. A. Cutter attended the Jnnior Prom. 
Feb. 12. 



'08.— Among the new seed catalogues are several 
very attractive editions from the firm of J. C. Vaughn 
& Co. , Chicago & New York. The work was largely 
done by D. P. Miller. 

•08.— J. W. Wellington has been doing some hor- 
ticultural work in the experiment station at Geneva. 
N Y., and has now been appointed assistant horticul- 
turist 'of the Vermont Experiment Station, and will 
enter upon his new work at once. 

♦08 — S. J. Wright has taken a position as man- 
ager of a farm, belonging to C. S. Houghton In 

Sherborn. 

•08.- R. H. Verbeck. W. S. Regan and W. J. 
Coleman attended the Junior Prom. 

'08.— A number of the Albany Express gives 
an account of the tree-doctoring in Capitol Park. 
In part it says; -"The work in this city is in 
charge of P. M. Eastman, a graduate of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College and six assistants, all of 
whom are well versed in their calling. The force is 
now engaged trimming and scraping the trees on the 
State street lawn. There are in all about seventy- 
five trees to be treated. Nearly twenty have already 
been examined. The work consists in trimming the 
limbs, painting the affected parts with a preparat.on 
of paint and cement where the cocoons of the elm 
beetle are to be found. In some instances great por- 
tions of the trunks of trees are gouged out and filled 
in with cement. In conversation with a Press- 
Knickerbocker- Express reporter yesterday. Mr. East- 
man said that the heart of a tree could be removed 
without any detriment to the tree. 'When filled in 
with cement the support is as good as though the tree 
had not been damaged. The trees which we have 
finished treating should last at least seventy-five 
years to come.' Mr. Eastman and his assistants 
receive $5 per day for their work. They are work- 
ing by the day and not under contract. It was im- 
possible to obtain a contract price owing to the ina- 
bility of the State to determine just how much work 
was to be done. Most of the trees which have been 
examined prove to be affected. 

'08 -Married. June 16, 1908, W. A. Cummings 
and Miss Lillian M. Ives of Bondsville, address 353 
Webster Ave.. Chicago, HI. 

'08.— Married, Dec. 24, Leroy E. Cutting and 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'23 



Bertha May Harlow. At home after Feb. 1, 7 Bea- 
con Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

'08. — C. C. Gowdey has accepted a position as 
Government Entomologist at Northern Nigeria, his 
first contract running for three years. In addition to 
his salary, accommodations are supplied and three 
months vacation at the end of each year is given 
together with free transportation to and from England 
during that time. Mr. Gowdey sailed from England 
Dec. 2, and probably left England for Africa on the 
14th or 15th. His address is Government Entomol- 
ogist, Uganda, British East Africa. 

'08.— E. D. Philbrick has gone to Chicago as 
western manager for Munson, Whitaker Co. Address 
1001 Monadnock Building, Chicago, III. 

'08. — The Springfield Republican of Jan. 3, gives a 
detailed account of the new Agricultural High School 
at Montague. The following extract is made : 

"The new school is under the management of the 
state industrial commission. The present enrollment 
of pupils is forty-three, of which twenty-five are tak- 
ing the agricultural course. Thomas Allen is princi- 
pal and teaches mathematics and science. John R. 



Parker teaches agriculture and science. Instruction 
is also given in Latin, French, Sewing. English, Ger- 
man and History. The adjoining towns send a num- 
ber of pupils. Mr. Parker is teaching text-book 
work and experimental agriculture, giving attention to 
the composition of soils, drainage and tillage. Fer- 
tilizers and animal husbandry will come in later. 
Plots of land are to be assigned to pupils in the spring 
for them to work. Manual training is also in charge 
of Mr. Parker." 

Among the visitors since Christmas : K.E.Gillett.J. 
R. Parker, Park W. Farrar, C. S. Gillett. A. L. 
Whiting, '08; E. H. Brown, W. W. Hayward, 
Ex- '09. 

Ex- '08. — A. D. Farrar, who has been connected 
with the Derby and Shelton Y. M. C. A. in Connec- 
ticut since December, 1907, has taken the position 
of general secretary of the Athol Y. M. C. A. 

Ex- '08. — Marcus M. Browne, manager of the 
Marlboro Stock Farms, Marlboro, visited the Stock 
and Dairy Show held in Chicago last December. 

Ex-' 11.— H. F. Hyatt and R. E. Wheeler are in 
Kent, 0., taking a course in the Davy School of 
Forestry. 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



r>E>UJKIv*S DRUG STORE 






124 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







FOR MEN 




A Year in College 



$250 cash or a year in College can be easily earned by 
one young man or lady in each county by September 
1909. Plan does not interfere with other employment 
and student can select the school. 

State name of institution you wish to attend. No 
money required. 

For Particulars address, 

MOBTOM II. l'KMISKKTON, 

Columbia, Missouri. 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
PROM LONDON. 



Rabar's Jim, 



SOUTHAMPTON, MAS- 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



ol.l South Street, off Main, 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Hi ■ami fill Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " H»mp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IX THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



IKTKR-COLLBOIATI BUREAU OF Academic Costumk 

Collet Ca ps and 601011$. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



It's Your Next at the 



Meisi House Barter Slop 



Four First Class Barbers 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy- 
Underwear, Hoisery. Oloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 



Fancy Crackers, 



Confectionery and Fruit, 







Open Mondays from 


■J A. M. tO 8 P. M 


Tuesdays 


r « 6 * 


Wednesdays, ; 


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For over Fifty Years the Standard of Fxcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO i 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 95^ Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

1 hir Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE HOBTiER COPIPflKY. 



a-4-26 Stone Street, 



NKW YORK. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It Is generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRKiHT A 1)11 SON 
have the best looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The WRKiHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
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Nothing like one of our 
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Chicago Providence, K. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




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USE 



BOWKER'S 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL REPAIR DEPARTMENT-. 

*£• A- THOMI'XOX, 

Rear First National Hank, a mm 



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Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and I foods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth Av<- , Nkw York. 






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\f> 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GonnscUGut valley Street Railway Go. 

AMHKHHT DIVISION. 

Car» will leave Au.heistaml Northampton on the h"" »«"} 
hHlhourlroni6.WA.li.tin 10.80P.M. Sundays the first car 

Will ^""^foriCE, GREENFIELD. MASS. 

John A . Tagtfart, supt. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To itaio your Bole. Come tome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall. 



DENTAli ROOMS, 



CUTLER'S BLOCK. 



AMHERST, MA88 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 

"Central lemont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. TJ. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ■ AMHERST. MASS. 

OFFICE HOURS: 
9 TO 12 A~ *&., 1-30 TO O v. ft*. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when dealred 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1908. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m., 
express, and 5.38 p. m. The 5.38 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 

6.20 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



BUY 

GOOD 

CLOTHES 

Don't be a "ready-made" nor a "cheap- 
tailored" man. Pay a fair price for your 
clothes and have the satisfaction of being 
dressed as well as the next man. 

The new SPRING and SUMMER 
patterns have arrived and invite attention. 
I guarantee a perfect fit. Also the best 
trimmings and workmanship. 

Order your Spring Suit now. 

Full Dress Suits to rent. 

Pressing and Altering neatly done. 



I. M. LABROVITZ 

TAIl-OR STORE 

ii Amity St. :: Amherst 

Telephone, 54-4 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH 



27 Main St., 



Northampton. 



Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted for ita excellent 

Oyater Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from U.h.uxa. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MAHCFACTUBEB OF 

SODA WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountain* charged to order 



Rives Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR, 

Has received the latent fabrics for the spring and summer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladles' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Preying promptly done. 

Kf-Mllitary Work a Specialty...^ 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhkrst, Mass. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD COBNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



AMHERST HOUSE, 

Everything New andUp-to-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



M.A.C.Aa't, 



C. R. WEBB, »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

*• Thursday delivered Saturday. 

rar8ATI8FAOTION OUARANTEEDJW' 
it. A. UTMT, Manager. 

Office : 
E eca r t Pleasant Street. 



Your Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATCH MAKER 

ii Amity St., Amhkrst, Mass. 

Mainsprings, i year «, — 

Cleaning, j I-00 

Prompt reliable work at Lowest Prices. 



The Children are Happy. 

Because ttielr clothes are made on the Raw Home sewino 

Machine, which fact, azures them of no "rips " Mothers 

should get one at once as it will do for their children In vein 

to come. Dealers Everywhere. /«■•» 



•J 



■ 1 







1 







THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without lending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 




DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, IB. A. C. 

Telephone. 



PHOTOGKAPHEK, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



A^iTeTd^rT L. H. Tourtklottk. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WIIOI.EHA1.K PKAI.KK8 AND .IOIIIIKK8 IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PNOTOGRAPNIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AMHERST. MASS 



J. H.TROTT 



Uniforms 
for all 
Athletic 
Sport* 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



Official 

Implements 

for all 

Track and 

Field Sports 

Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue of 
"all sports contains numerous suggestions 
Mailed free anywhere 

A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. 
73 Federal St., - " Boston. 



PLUmBEB, STEBm k MS FITTER, 

lug DEALER III STOVES HMD URGES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Plhasant St. 



Telephone 3 6 " 12 - 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Raceive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 

FDRNITDREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLETE LINK OK GOODS 
SUITED TO THE 8TUDENT8' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



KSTAHI.ISHKI) 1851. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NKW YORK. 

[KIMUTKKN ANI> MANITKAI'TIIKKKN M 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and Scientific Apparatus, 

-A.SS-A.Y aOODS. 



We handle the hest Of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest J'rices. 



EL. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Rath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



LEW 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for Ji.jo. 

GERARD. N. LEW. 

'i PLEASANT ST. REAR HENKV FISH'S STORE. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MAS8. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFF: OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 






AMHttSf , flA$$. 



i 



i 




■t> I TH E l-^<\ + 

flfoassacbusetts 
HGricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Cocrsb in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2 j^ POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modem Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



Mat 

-As: rixl 

C i ge. 



THE COLLEGE SMAL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 11 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH lO, 1909 






I 






We wou.d like a share of your patronage, we are retook and well know. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
Have Custom and Ready-made C.othing, Sweaters, Gloves, Chi Cloth.ng. and .n 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO 



page's Sboe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARG 



K 




Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VIOIilH, BAHJO, WWiDOIilH, GUITflH STR1HGS. 

OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 

~ tmSTTiribe: r* s 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 

best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 

branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

, 9 o Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W, R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 



10. 1909 



NO. II 



*-. , PUbHahed F ° rtni ' ht,y by S,udenU ot the Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Student* and Ahimnl are requested to contribute. Communication, should h. *m~.~a r-~ 
.en. to .11 tub-criber. until It. - ™ '- - ', '™ ^i* *?"* C* "— —-* Amh.kst. Mam Th« S.ohal wili be 

notify theBuIn— Manager. *"•*" m *"■ S"*""*™ who do not receive their paper regularly are requeted to 



R. C. POTTER. 1909. College Note.. 

M. F. CEER. 1909, Alumni Note.. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Y. M. C. A. Note. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 
O. B. BRICGS. 1 909. Bu.tneu Manager. 
W. R. CLARKE, 1910. Awlstant Editor 
E. F. DAMON. l9IO.AtefrtantBu.ineM Manager. 

L. C. BROWN. 1910, Athletic Note.. 
H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Department Note$ . 
„ ^ »« A. H. SHARPE, 1911. 

E. M. BROWN. 1911. 



J^-.^l.OO per ^r ,0 .<c«ce. S.„ 9 ,. Cop,-. ,Oc. Po.U 8 . o.teld. o, United ^ „< C B .<U. ..c. .Ktm. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot-Ball AMociation. 
Baaket-Ball Asaociation. 
: Ball AMOc«at ion. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 
H. W. Turner, Pre.. College Senate. 

Prof. S. F. Howard, iec. 
R. H. Allen, Manager. 
R. C. Llndblad. Manager 
E. J. Burke. Manager. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index 
Y. M. C A. 

Musical Asaociation. 



Enured aa .econd-claM matter. Poet Office at Amher*. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Llndblad. Pre*. 
F. T. Haynea. Manager . 
C. H. White. Pre.. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 



Cditbri^ls. 



Informal, March 20. 



Competition for positions on the Sicnal Board 
closed Sunday, Feb. 28. As grades on the latest 
reports have not been returned, the names of suc- 
cessful candidates cannot be announced officially. 



have the next chance at the bill. The prospect is 
they will cut it but the favorable passage of the appro- 
priation by the committee on agriculture, it would 
seem, will bear some weight. 



The rare treat of being able to listen to talented 
musicians at the college was afforded on the occa- 
sion of the celebration of the centenary of Mendel- 
ssohn and Chopin at Assemby, Wednesday, Feb. 24. 
Mr. Ashley is due thanks from the undergraduates 
for providing such an excellent concert. 



The appropriation of $165,105 carrying with it 
everything, except the $6,000 for the house for the 
head of the division of horticulture, was reported last 
Friday afternoon by the committee on agriculture in 
the House. The ways and means committee will 



The annual number of College and Alumni News 
has just been published. It is a pamphlet of eighty 
pages with maroon covers. After briefly giving the 
status of the college, the 1908 commencement is 
taken up; the addresses of President Butterfield and 
Dr. Jordan of the New York Experiment Station are 
printed in full. Sketches of the chief events of the 
year follow, with accounts of alumni dinners. Fif- 
teen pages of alumni notes conclude the list. The 
"Reunion Scheme" officially adopted by the Asso- 
ciate Alumni at their June meeting in 1906 and later 
published in detail in the Signal is called to the 
attention of the alumni. The schedule is printed. 
The scheme is admirable in its conception and should 
be met with favor and by an awakened enthusiasm 
and co-operation. The picture of Prof. C. H. Fer- 






1 



ia6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



12J 




i 









nald appears as frontispiece to the News while four 
views of the ruins of the barn, a portrait of the late 
W. W. Rawson of Arlington, and a perspective ren- 
dering of French Hall are published. 



By the death of Carroll Davidson Wright, Satur- 
day Feb. 20, the college loses one of its best friends 
and'workers. Although allied with the college as a 
trustee only since 1905 he was always actively inter- 
ested in the work of the college. In the hearts of 
the trustees, the faculty and especially President 
Butterfield he held a warm place. The undergradu- 
ates may recall his hopeful and forceful talk at the 
college supper last fall, in which he prophesied a 
bright future for M. A. C. Indeed his was a 11 e o 
lofty ideals and service. No better can Colonel 
Wright's life be summed up than In Dr. Samuel A. 
Eliot's eulogy: "He was a man who took life In a 
large way. unvexed by disappointment, unspoilt by 
successes, giving a wholesome energy to many enter- 
prises " And Colonel Wright's ideal of manhood is 
brought out in his favorite poem, read at the funeral 
services by Rev. Austin S. Garver : 

"I like the man who faces what he must. 
With step triumphant and a heart of cheer ; 
Who fights the daily battle without fear ; 
Sees his hopes fail, yet keeps unfaltering trust 
That God is God j that somehow, true and just 
His plans work out for mortals ; not a tear 
Is shed when fortune, which the world holds dear, 
Falls from his grasp ; better, with love, a crust 
Than living in dishonor ; envies not. 
Nor loses faith in man ; but does his best. 
Nor ever murmurs at his humbler lot. 
But with a smile and words of hope, gives zest 
To every toiler; he alone is great. 
Who by a life heroic conquers fate." 



have been covered very creditably by Mr. Brown 
Thanks are due those alumni who have contributed 
to the news columns of the Signal or by their sub- 
scriptions have made possible its publication. And 
to all who have in any way assisted In the task the 
editor expresses his appreciation of their goodwill. 
With these few words the retiring Board submits 
to the new the pleasure of publishing the college 
newspaper. May the new Board continue to advance 
its standard. 



Athletic N°**S- 



HOCKEY. 

Trinity, 1; M. A. C, 0. 
The hockey season ended Feb. 27 with a defeat at 
the hands of Trinity. The game is not worthy of 
description, for the soft condition of the ice made 
skating impossible, and It soon degenerated into a 
men pushing contest. The puck was in Trinity s 
territory most of the time, and Breed was lucky in 
pushing It by Adams and Hathaway for the only goal 
of the game just as the first half closed. 
The line-up: 



TRINITY. 

Roberts (capt ). 

Breed. 

Rankin, 

Haight. 

Buck. 

Eaton. 

Brainard. 

Goal— Breed. 



rover, 
right wing, 
left wing, 
center, 
cover point, 
point, 
goal, 
Referee— Dr. Reynolds. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Peckham 

Sanctuary 

N orris 

Brandt, (capt.) 

Adams 

Hathaway 

Ackerman 

Timers— Regan 



f M A. C. and Bourne of Dartmouth. Goal umpire-Mr. 
McKimmie of M. A. C. Time-10-minute periods. 
// REVIEW OF THE HOCKEY SEASON. 

The first hockey team that ever represented M. A. 
Of the editorial columns of this, the ast ssue to season Altnough it WO n but 

be published by the retiring board, the editor- n-ch.ef CJ^° P those at the very beginning of its 
ventures to take a few inches for a personal word. 




The work of editing the Signal for the past year has 
been pleasurable despite drawbacks imposed by lack 
of time and space. To the board of associates no 
small credit Is due for the readiness with which they 
have responded to calls for news. Particular men- 
tion must be made of the faithful work of the alumni 
notes editor, Mr. Geer. in maintaining a just balance 
of alumni news. The athletic games of the year 



schedule, the team can be credited with a successfu 
season, for its defeats were by very small scores, and 
at the hands of veteran teams. 

Dr Reynolds was the prime mover in the organiz- 
ation of the new sport. He talked It up among the 
students and got them so interested that a good bunch 
of candidates reported when the first call came. A 
rink was procured on the college pond, and arrange- 



ments made to keep It clear of snow. The team 
organized, chose R. C. Potter, '09. manager, Louis 
Brandt, '10, captain, and started on a good schedule. 
Springfield Training School was defeated 2-0 on our 
rink, and Northampton Y. M. C. A. 6-0. These 
victories aroused considerable enthusiasm, but the 
team experienced a decided slump, and could not get 
back into winning form. S. T. S. defeated us by 
one point in our return game, Amherst scored three 
to our nothing. M. I. T. scored a victory by one 
point, and Trinity did the same. The condition of 
the ice was poor in the last two games, and trips to 
Cornell, Williams and Wesleyan were cancelled 
because of lack of good ice. 

The team received no appropriation from the Ath- 
letic Association and Manager Potter deserves credit 
for running a successful season under such circum- 
stances. Next year, with an appropriation, a long 
schedule will be possible, with plenty of home games. 
With one exception the entire hockey team will be 
back again next fall, and a successful season is looked 
forward to. By graduation we lose Hathaway who 
has proven very strong on the defense, holding the 
position of point. The hockey squad was as follows: 
Louis Brandt *10 (captain), E. F. Hathaway '09. J. 
F. Adams '11. C. Peckham '12. E. J. Norrls '12, 
W. Sanctuary '12, A. G. Bentley '11, A. J. Acker- 
man '12, T. Hemenway '12 and S. P. Puffer '12. 

At a meeting of the hockey team after the Trinity 
game Lyman Gibbs Schermerhorn '10, was elected 
manager. Louis Brandt '10, was re-elected captain. 
George Nickerson '11, has been elected assistant 
manager. 

The Athletic Board has voted to recognize the 
hockey team as a part of the Athletic Association and 
to award a suitable recognition to those men playing 
in a certain number of games, this number yet to be 
decided upon. Either an M with crossed sticks or 
an h M t will be awarded. 



ending 29- 1 9 on our floor. Manager Lindblad was 
forced to place a team composed almost entirely of 
substitutes on the floor, and to this fact the size of 
Springfield's score is due. The game was fast and 
clean, both sides guarding closely. Training School's 
team work was better than ours, Winters. Messer, 
and McCulloch being especially clever. All of our 
scoring was done in the first half, at the end of which 
the score was 14-7. In the second half, Springfield 
got very busy, and made 17 more points, placing the 
score at 31-7. 
The line-up: 

TRAININO SCHOOL. MASSACHUSETTS. 

McCulloch. I.f.. rg . wm , s 

Messer. Schnurr. r.f.. |. fi , Schermerhorn 

Winters. c -> c. Oppel 

Wright. I.g.. r .f., Moreau, Covill 

Anderson. Messer. r g„ |.f. # Regan 

Score— Training School 31, M. A. C. 7. Goals from 
floor— Messer 6. McCulloch 6. Schnurr 2. Regan. Oppel 2. 
Point awarded Training School. Goals from fouls— Messer 
2. Schermerhorn. Referee — C. W. Hardy. Time— 20 and 
15-minute halves. Attendance— 200. 



BASKETBALL. 

S. T. S., 31; M. A. C, 7. 

Our basketball team was decisively defeated by 
Springfield Training School, Feb. 20, on the latter's 
floor. It was the second time this season that we 
have been defeated by this team, the first game 



M. A. C, 25; U. of M., 24. 

In one of the fastest and by far the roughest game 
of the year on the drill hall floor, Wednesday. Feb. 
24, our basketball team just managed to overcome 
Maine's lead and win out. The score at the end of the 
first half was 13- 16 In favor of Maine. In the second 
half M. A. C. got her team-work into operation, and 
she overtook Maine just a minute before the end of 
the game. Then Burke threw a foul, and that last 
minute was a strenuous one, with the visitors trying 
in vain to land the one basket needed for victory. 

The only characteristic of the game worthy of 
mention was the roughness, there being thirty fouls 
called, twenty of them on our side. Hosmer and 
Oppel were the worst offenders, with eight and six. 
The former was forced to retire after repeated warn- 
ings from the referee. Turner, '12, replaced him, 
and showed up well for a new man. 

Burke was one of the stars of the game, being 
responsible for eleven of our points. He, however, 
allowed his opponent to shoot four baskets. Scales 
also did well for Maine, getting two baskets and eight 
on fouls. 

The line-up : 



128 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE. 
MASSACHUSETTS. 

*•*■•'■«» f.g.. Stewart 

PearS °eK' k - c. Black 

Oppel. Schermerhorn. c. 

H««n.r Turner. Kg.. , f .. Wadsworth 

Neale. Moreau. r.g., «- 

Score-M.A.C.25,U.ofM.,24. Baskets by Burke 4. 
Pearson. Oppel 3, Hosmer 2. Scales 2. Marshall 4. Black. 
Fouls thrown by Burke 3. Hosmer 2. Scales 8. Referee- 
Keough of Amherst. Time— 20-minute halves. 



M. A. C 23; W. P. I., 21. 
Feb. 27 in another of those fast games which 
seem to be all the style this year at the drill hall, 
our basketball team just managed to pull out victori- 
ous, this time by a margin of two points. The game 
had none of the poor features of the previous game, 
there being only a few fouls on each side. The play 
was fast, good team work being shown most of the 
time on 'both sides. Occasionally a long spectacular 
shot was successfully made. Burke and Fitzpatrick 
especially shining in this department. 

Fitzpatrick was high man for Worcester with six 
baskets. His throwing of fouls was weak, however, 
one out of a possible eight being the best he could do. 
James at center found time to drop four into the ring. 
For Massachusetts Hosmer played his usual vigor- 
ous game, wearing out two of the visitors, and mak- 
ing a good start on the third. He too put four bas- 
kets to his credit. Pearson got a goal in each half, 
but it was Burke who led the home team in scoring. 
He let the ball drop through the ring five times and 
shot one free basket. 
The line-up: 

W. P. I. 

r.g.. Smith. Fitzpatrick 

l.g.. Curley 

c. James 

r.f.. Atherton. Wells. Treadwell 

l.f., Fitzpatrick. Smith 

CAW. P. 1.21. Goals-Fitzpatrick 6. 

Burke 5, James 4. Hosmer 4. Pearson 2. Fouls thrown- 

Burke. Fitzpatrick. Referee-Keough of Amherst. Time— 

20-minute periods. 

BASEBALL. 

With the return of warm weather and longer days, 
baseball has begun to occupy the attention of the 
public, both in college and out. The conditions at 
M. A. C. are apparently good. Manager E. J. 



Burke, MO, says: -Captain O'Grady will issue his 
first call for candidates for the baseball team this 
week The prospects for a good season. If not the 
best in recent years, are very bright, and with the 
co-operation of the student body a creditable showing 
will surely be made. The outfield will probably be 
composed of the same players, at least in center and 
left, as last year, for O'Grady. '09, and F. C. 
Warner '09. are still in college. Hubbard. 09. 
who covered the initial sack so creditably last year, 
will be seen at his old position. French, '10, will 
be a candidate for catcher where he has played for 
two seasons. There are a number of Infield posi- 
tions open, and every candidate Is assured an even 
chance, so it is up to every fellow who has ever 
played baseball to show up and do his best for the 

position." 

Manager Burke has prepared one of the best 
schedules ever olayed by our teams, especially with 
respect to home games. With six home games 
besides Amherst and S. T. S., the student body will 
be able to follow the team better than in previous 
years, when only a few home games appeared on the 
schedule. This should result In more hearty support 
of the team by the students, and improvement along 
all lines. 



129 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Burke, l.f.. 
Pearson, r.f.. 
Schermerhorn, c. 
Hosmer, l.g., 
Neale. Turner, r.g., 



FOOTBALL REPORT. 

I hereby submit the following report of the 
ball season for 1908. 

RECEIPTS. 

$800 00 
198 00 

1,532 37 

56 25 

137 00 



Foot- 



Apportionment , 
Alumni. 
Guarantees, 
Gate receipts, 
Subscriptions, 



$2,723 62 



Coaching, 

Cost of trips and games, 

Equipment and sweaters, 

Medical attendance. 

Medical supplies. 

Printing, 

Cost of officials, 

Dining Hall, 

Special expenses, 



EXPENDITURES. 

$656 50 



1.121 52 
414 85 

46 00 
32 61 
17 75 

162 60 
15 20 

47 62 



Telephones and telegrams, 

Express, 

Stationery, 

Total Receipts, 
Total Expenditures, 
Balance on Hand, 



1 1 
7 
6 



06 
85 
50 



$2,723 62 
2,540 06 



$2,540 06 



$183 56 



SlCNED, 

Myron W. Thompson, Mcr. 
Approved, 

John N. Summers, Auditor. 



Collet flottS- 



Born, Tuesday, Feb. 23, a son to Mr. and Mrs. C. 
R. Duncan. 

F. T. Haynes.' 10, spent last Saturday and Sunday 
at his home in Sturbridge. 

M. S. Hazen, '10 has been entertaining his two 
younger brothers the end of last week. 

R. H. Patch, '11, entertained a friend from his 



home town over Washington's birthday. 
H. C. Walker, '12, shot a large fox Feb. 20, while Ion the affirmative; Dodge and McLaine defendeTthe 



At a recent meeting of the Rifle Club. L. 0. 
Stevenson, 'II, was elected executive officer. The 
members of the club are rapidly getting In condition 
for the Indoor Shoot to be held this month in com- 
petition for the Intercollegiate Rifle Trophy. 

The Junior class has elected the following officers 
for the ensuing semester ■ President, R. S. Eddy of 
Boston; vice-president, R. P. Armstrong of Ruther- 
ford. N. J.; secretary and treasurer, F. L. Thomas 
of Athol; class captain, R. A. Waldron of Hyde 
Park; S. at A.. H. T. Cowles of Worcester. 

The Stockbridge Club was addressed Tuesday 
evening, March 2. by Dr. Sanborn of Holden, who 
discussed his methods of raising poultry. Following 
the talk, officers for the remainder of the semester 
were elected: President, O. B. Brlggs. '09, vice- 
president, H. W. French, '10; secretary-treasurer, 
J. C. Bailey, '10. 

The topic for debate at the meeting of the Debating 

Club last Thursday evening was : ' ' Resolved : That 

free trade should be established between the United 
States and the Philippines." Ide and Sharpe spoke 



hunting in the brush behind Mt. Pleasant 

A telephone booth has been installed in the west 
entry of North College, thus making possible use of 
the telephone without interference from outside noises. 
The Junior class will give a play at Commencement 
to raise money to pay off the deficit of the Junior 
Prom. The books have arrived and rehearsals are 
being held. 

H. G. Noble, '09, L. C. Brown, '10, and Q. S. 
Lowry ' 1 2 attended the conclave and banquet of the 
first district of Kappa Sigma in Cambridge and Boston 
on Monday, Feb. 22. 

President Kenyon L. Butterfield has been tendered 
an invitation by the directors of the "Carew lectures" 
of Hartford seminary to lecture next autumn on some 
°f the relations of the country church to the rural 
problem. 

The largest audience of the season attended the 
Union entertainment, Saturday evening, Feb. 27, in 
Chapel. Mr. Pitt Parker, "Crayon Wizard", was the 
entertainer. His "lightning" crayon sketches and 
landscapes and bright witticisms revealed deep truths 
vlthal. 



negative. The judges were >, Potter. Hubbard and 
Patch. The decision was awarded to the negative. 

Hon. Frederick H. Jackson, ex-lieutenant-governor 
of Rhode Island, spoke at Assembly, Wednesday, 
March 3. After sketching briefly the exercises at- 
tending the inauguration of a president of the United 
States, he discussed the administration just brought to 
a close and predicted that the great factor in the 
coming administration will be the work for the con- 
servation of our national resources. 

The third annual meeting of the New England Con- 
ference on Rural Progress was held Thursday and 
Friday, March 4 and 5, at the office of the Massa- 
chusetts State Board of Agriculture. President 
Butterfield, Professors Sears, Hart and Foord and H. 
W. French, '10 attended. Thursday was devoted to 
section meetings. The general topic for discussion 
Friday was "The value of an agricultural survey of 
New England." 

President Butterfield addressed the meeting of the 
Massachusetts School- masters' Club, in Hotel Bruns- 
wick, Boston. He presented the stand taken by the 
Country Life Commission in emphasizing the Im- 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•3' 




»3° 

He also pointed out the need of a survey of the rura 
section of Massachusetts, explaining the Captation of 
the state to apple growing. The proposed Massa- 
chusetts College was the principal topic of the evening. 

kindly return the book 10 G. A. Felcn. s. K. 
Library. 



MEBDELSSOHB-CHOPIH COMCERT. 

Assembly, Wednesday, Feb. 24. was devoted to a 
concert .n commemoration o. the centenaries of the 
composers, Felix Mendelssohn-BarthoK, and If ^ 
Francois Chopin. Mr. E. L. Ashley wn 
charge of the concert, secured for the occasion Bos- 
ton Ulent. namely, Mlss Edith Allda Bollard, soprano 
Hist at Kings Chapel, Raymond Robinson pianist, 
Lang Studios, and Mrs. Pulslv.r, «« m P anl *'- 

The program was divided Into two parts, the first 
being Sevoted entirely to Mendelssohn while the 
second consisted of the compositions of Chopin. At 
^beginning of each part Mr. Ashley gave a sketch 
" , he composer to whom that part was devo ed. and 
Hid some of the leading characteristics of his com- 

^Assembly hour was changed from LIS to 
4 .£an^ck««swereonsal..ome public, a large 

number of whom attended. 

PROGRAM. 
I. 

Mendelssohn— Mr. Ashley. 

Songs—The First Violets, 

On Wings of Music, 

O for thf Wings of a Dove, Miss Bullard 
Songs without Words-(a) Hunting Song. 

(b) Spring Song, 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Mar ll-Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 

Debating Club, 7-45 p. m. In Chapel. 
Mar 13-Union Entertainment, 6-30 p. m. in Chapel. 
Speaker, Prof. David Todd of Amherst. 

Mar. 14— Bible Study, 4 p.m. 

Vespers, 5 p. m. in Chapel. Speaker, A. 
H. Evans, Northampton. 
Mar 16-Stockbrldge Club, 7 p. m. in Agriculture 
Room. Speaker, Dr. J. B. Lindsey. 
Mar. 17-Assembly, 1-15 P. M. in Chapel. 
Speaker. J. Horace McFarland, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Mar 18 _ Y . M. C. A.. 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
Speaker, N. S. Shultis, '96. 
Debating Club. 7-45 p. m. In Chapel. 
Mar. 21— Bible Study, 4 p. m. 

Vespers, 5 p. m. In Chapel. Speaker. 
Rev. L. P. Powell. Northampton. 
Mar. 23-Stockbrldge Club, 7 p. m. in Agriculture 

Room. 
Mar 24— Assembly. 1-15 p. m. in Chapel. 
Concert by the Glee Club. 



Rondo Caprlccloso, 
Aria, Hear Ye, O Israel. 

II. 
Chopin— Mr. Ashley. 

Nocturne G, 

Vabe Ab, 
Song—Maiden's Wish, 

Ballade F, 

Nocturne Eb, 

Grande Polonaise Brllllante, 



Mr. Robinson 
Miss Bullard 



Mr. Robinson 
Miss Bullard 



Mr. Robinson 



COLLEGE NIGHT. 

The second College Night of the year was held 
Friday evening, Feb. 26, when the trustees faculty 
alumni and students got together at supper at Drape 
Hall While supper was being served the orchestra 
played. After supper there were speeches interspersed 
with selections by the college quartet. The college 
veil was given each speaker. 

President Butterfleld opened the remarks by reading 
Carroll D. Wright's favorite poem. He spoke of Col. 
Wright's sympathy with young men ; he was a young 
man's man. Then In honor to his memory all stood 
for a moment in silence. 

Prof C H. Femald was the first speaker, pro- 
fessor Fernald has been the director of the graduate 
school ever since It started. He spoke on the J £ 
eral subject of co-operation and especially co-oper a 
tion by encouragement. He thought the facu y 
should encourage the students and that we > should e 
courage the trustees who put so much of the.r time in 



for us and do not receive any pay for it. It is easy 
enough to find fault but praise is not given often 
enough. He spoke of the graduate school. The 
professors do not have time to give the graduate 
students the attention they should have. There 
should be new Instructors appointed to take some of 
the undergraduate work and thus give more time to the 
professors for the graduate work. He called atten- 
tion to the fact that In every instance men who have 
done postgraduate work have made good. He said 
that the typical college president was very erect, 
arbitrary, dignified and somewhat overbearing, but 
our president is not a typical president. We must 
co-operate to make the best college. 

R. H. Verbeck, '08. was the next speaker. He 
said that his first impression of college co-operation 
was in the old college rush out on the campus when 
he was cheered on by the knowledge that all the 
others in the class was having just as hard a time as 
he was. His last impression was at graduation when 
the binding ties seemed stronger than ever before. 
He spoke of the number of new enterprises being 
started around college which showed co-operation. 

0. C. Bartlett. '09. spoke on co-operation in col- 
lege life. He said that the man who spent the most 
time for his college was looked up to most. There 
should be more co-operation. Finally we want more 
college spirit to help to make this college the best of 
its kind in the country. 

Professor Foord brought out the fact that co-opera- 
tion without continuity does not amount to much. In 
order to succeed we must have continuity. He said 
that one of the dangers of the broader elective system 
that Is going to be adopted is the lack of continuity 
on the part of tne students. Professor Sears said 
that we could co-operate from looking at things from 
the other fellow's standpoint. We are too liable to 
condemn another man's opinions or action because it 
is not like our own when, if we would put ourselves in 
his place we would appreciate his action. 

The trustees were represented at the supper by Mr. 
Bowker. He said that co-operation is the foundation 
of society. Our whole government rests upon It. 
But society and government rest on the individual and 
are no stronger than the average individual. Some 
People co-operate but do not do their part. Mr. 
Bowker turned to the practical side of co-operation 



and expressed himself of the opinion that farmers 
took hold of co-operation at the wrong end. Instead 
of co-operation buying there should be co-operation 
selling. In other business there was very little co- 
operative buying but the co-operation came in produc- 
ing, grading, holding and selling. 

It was a great disappointment that Representative 
Hosmer could not be at the supper. President But- 
terfleld said "We can hardly realize what he does 
for us. His whole heart is with us and he is one of 
our best friends. He is always welcomed here with 
enthusiasm." At the close of the exercises the stu- 
dents sent the following tribute to Frank A. Hosmer \ 
"The student body assembled at Draper Hall send 
greeting to its loyal friend, the Hon. Frank A. Hos- 
mer, and sincerely regret that he was not able to be 
present to aid in celebrating the midwinter college 
night." 



CARROLL D. WRIGHT— STATISTICIAN, 
SOCIOLOGIST AND EDUCATOR 

[The Springfield Republican'] 
Carroll D. Wright, president of Clark college of 
Worcester, whose death has occurred In his 69th 
year,— was a citizen of high distinction and service, 
and indeed one of the invaluable men of the country. 
He had a clear brain, a fine conscience, indefatigable 
industry, and was altogether the greatest statistician of 
the day, besides being a wise student and teacher of 
social economics, — incapable, moreover, of being 
swayed by partisan prejudice or personal partiality. 
So well were his independent and unbiased judgment 
and his extraordinary ability recognized that political 
changes left him in the undisturbed confidence and 
trust of republican and democrat, capitalist and work- 
ingman alike. He was the real organizer and first 
chief of the Massachusetts bureau of statistics of 
labor, which was the first such bureau in the world and 
the model for those that have followed it ; he was the 
first federal commissioner of labor, and held that post 
for ten years ; he had charge of the federal census of 
Massachusetts in 1880, and the state census five 
year later, and was director of the 1 Ith census of the 
United States. These have been his chief official 
government positions, but an important service besides 
was that of making the report on the situation In the 
anthracite coal fields at the time of the great strike, 






•3* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



l 33 



and his constant counsel in the subsequent negotia- 
tions between President Roosevelt and the miners. 

Col. Wright's work has been so steady, his appoint- 
ments so obviously fit, his performance of duty so 
simply done, without a single flourish, that to the 
people at large his importance may not have been en- 
tirely understood. There remain a great many 
writings to show it ; 15 yearly volumes of reports of 
the Massachusetts bureau of statistics of labor; several 
special reports of the United States commission of 
labor; and a number of independent pamphlets. 
Among the subjects he in one form or another dis- 
cussed are i — 

"Industrial depressions." "Convict labor." 
"Strikes and lockouts." "The relation of political 
economy to the labor question." "The factory sys- 
tem as an element in civilization. " " Scientific basis 
of tariff legislation. " "The present actual condition 
of the workingman." "The study of statistics in 
colleges." "Problems of the census." "Hand 
labor in prisons." "Historical sketch of the Knights 
of Labor." The growth and purposes of bureaus of 
statistics of labor." "Working women in large 
cities." "Railroad labor." "Marriage and di- 
vorce." "Cost of production of iron and steel." 
"Cost of production of textiles and glass." "In- 
dustrial evolution of the United States." 

The most striking feature of Col. Wright's life, it 
seems to us, has been his constant insistence on the 
essentiality of religion, even specifically the Christian 
religion, as the one that is most vital,— for the sound 
solution of the problems of our complex social order. 
He was no dogmatist,— the son of a Universalist min- 
ister, and himself a Unitarian in his church relation, 
—he deeply honored the Roman church for Its care 
for the wage-earning classes, and was an active teach- 
er in the university of that church in Washington. He 
declared in closing his "Outlines of Practical Soci- 
ology" that there must come a true religious revival 
which shall affect profoundly and for the better modify 
the conflicts of the present, whose study had been his 
pursuit so long, and In which he had himself a very 
helpful hand. He was a noble and elevated spirit, 
and whether as federal commissioner of labor or as 
president of the American Unitarian association, he 
was consciously in the service of the enduring decrees 
of the divine nature. 



Y- M.C- A. N<>*es. 



SUNDAY SERVICES. 

Sunday vespers, Feb. 28, were addressed by Mr. 
Carl Hamilton of Andover who spoke on, "The Man- 
liness of Jesus Christ" or. "The Manly Character of 
Christianity." He based his talk upon the latter 
part of Jesus' sermon on the Mount of Olives, where 
he tells of a wise man who built his house on a rock 
and of a foolish man who built his house on the sand. 
Mr. Hamilton said in part: 

"I wish to speak to you this afternoon on the man- 
liness of Christ or in other words of the manly char- 
acter of Christianity. All through the Bible this Idea 
of manliness is impressed upon us. Even the old 
testament characters were ever making manly appeals 
to their people. Think of the appeal of Moses to the 
people shortly before he left them, think how Joshua 
his successor said, 'Choose ye whom ye will serve, 
as for myself and my household we will serve the 
Lord. 1 think of what David said to Solomon his son 
'Be strong and show thyself a man.' and coming 
nearer to the new testament, think of what Isaiah 
said to the people 'Come, let us reason together 
saith the Lord.' Are these not all manly appeals? 
And we find them also all through the new testament. 
In the words which I read of the wise man and the 
foolish man Jesus contrasts the reasonableness of 
righteousness and the foolishness of sin." 

"He most lives, who thinks most, feels noblest, 
and acts best. The intellectuality of Christ leads 
the ages and always will. If you would have noble 
feelings you should have the companionship of 
Him Would you do inspiring acts; then you 
should have His inspiration. To be a Christian 
is not to submit to a petty ritual, as many think, 
but it is to enter into companionship with Christ. 

Who is this Christ? He is the noblest man 
that ever lived. In Him manhood was at its 
maximum. No improvement can ever be made 

on Him. 

"Everyone knows he ought to be a Christian, but 
there are two reasons out of the great multitude 
which I wish to present to you. First, because it h 
the manly thing to do; second, because the service 



of Christ calls for real heroism. It is not the solder's 
courage but moral courage. Many men have the 
former and not the latter. 

"It used to be thought that a Christian was a 
sort of milk and water sort of an individual, but 
they have at last come to realize that it takes 
the best kind of manhood. Gladstone was a Chris- 
tian. Do we think any the less of him because 
he went and prayed with a poor man in the 
depths of sin? Lincoln was a Christian. Do we 
think less of him or does he lose any of his 
manhood because he went to the home of Mr. 
Beecher and prayed God to save his country? 

"Early in creation God made man to earn his 
bread by the sweat of his brow. If we earn an edu- 
cation it is by the sweat of the mind and if we ever 
develop souls it will be by the sweat of the soul. 
Every man must have some sort of relation to Christ. 
It is one thing or another and you must answer some 
day." 

The meeting Feb. 25 was in charge oi A. W. 
Holland. 1910, who gave a short talk on "The 
Place of the Young Man in Society. ' ' He based 
his remarks upon the description of the miracle 
which Jesus performed at the wedding feast. 

Secretary Bardweli of the Northampton Y. M. C. 
A. addressed the Association March 4. He spoke 
on "The Martyr Stephen." He said "Stephen in 
his defense recounted the history of the Jewish 
nation. He showed how, time after time, they had 
rejected their deliverers and prophets just as they 
had rejected Christ. Stephen's hearers at last 
became so Infuriated that they stopped their ears and 
stoned him to death. In this same way we some- 
times shut God out of our lives. To have God's 
faculties we must give ourselves up to the guidance 
of the Holy Spirit." 



Dfpartmfivlr ftot?s. 



HORTICULTURE. 
W. J- Stewart of Boston, editor of Horticulture 
addressed the members of the Senior class in flori- 
culture and the floriculture class of the Short Course 
« Wilder Hall last week. His address was on 



"Wholesale marketing of cut flowers." This is the 
last of a series of outside speakers for the winter 

months who have addressed the classes. 

The Summer School of Agriculture established 
two years ago at college will be continued this year. 
In fact, it is now regarded as a permanent institution, 
having proved decidedly popular and successful during 
the last two summers. The attendance comes from 
all parts of New England, but most largely from Mas- 
sachusetts, a surprisingly large proportion being from 
the cities. School teachers predominate, but a good 
many land and lot owners go for the sake of the short 
practical courses in Agriculture and Horticulture. 
The school this year will run for six weeks in July and 
August, with the courses in field crops, gardening, 
dairying, fruit growing, live stock, chemistry, plant 
life, bird life, insect life, etc. Some of these courses 
are specially designed for grade teachers, some for 
high school teachers, others for practical people who 
do not teach, others for the clergy, so that everyone 
who has a week or more to spare can find something 
useful and interesting to do. 

PROGRAM FOR FARMERS' WEEK. 
To-day the short winter course in dairying and flori- 
culture comes to a close in connection with Farmers' 
Week, the following program being carried out: — 

Wednesday, the 1 0th, "Livestock and Dairying," 
— 10-10-30 a. m., "The Grain Problem," P. H. 
Smith; 10-30 II, "Cost of Cream and Milk Pro- 
duction," Dr. J. B. Lindsey; 11-15 12-15. "Care 
and Handling of Market Milk," Prof. W. P. B. Lock- 
wood; 2 3-30 p. m., "Judging Dairy Cattle," R. L. 
Gribben; 3-30-5-30, Demonstration, Babcock Test 
and Centrifugal Cream Separators, ( Dairy Rooms. 
South College), Prof. Lockwood and Messrs Hunt- 
ing and Coons ; 7-30-8, address, President Kenyon 
L. Butterfield; 8-9, "Poultry on Massachusetts 
Farms," John H. Robinson of Boston. 

Thursday, the 1 1th, Field Crops— 8-15-9-15 a. m., 
"Grasses, Clovers, Alfalfa," S. B. Haskell; 9- 
30 10-30, "Corn Growing in New England," N. H. 
Brewer of Hockanum, Conn.; 1 1-12, "Fertilization 
of Com and Grass," Prof. W. P. Brooks; 2-3-30 
p. m., Corn Judging, with explanation and examina- 
tion of samples, Prof. J. A. Foord and Mr. Brewer; 
3-30-5-30, inspection of feeding stuff and fertilizer 



•34 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'35 






laboratories, West Experiment Station ; botanical 
laboratories (fungus diseases, etc.), Clark Hall; 
entomological laboratory, insectary ; 7-30, "Some 
Reasons for Teaching Agriculture in the Schools," 
Prof. W. R. Hart; illustrations of actual work in 
school agriculture, Prof. F. B. Jenks. 

Friday, the 12th, Horticulture and Floriculture, 8- 
15-9-15 a. m., "The Farmer's Garden," H. F. 
Tompson; 9-30-10-30, "Strawberries as a Paying 
Farm Crop." Wilfrid Wheeler of Concord ; 11-12, 
Apple Packing Demonstration, Prof. F. C. Sears; 
2-4 p. M., Dedication of French Hall, address by J. 
K. M. L. Farquhar of Boston; 4-5-30, flower show 
and inspection of new greenhouses and the division 
of horticulture ; 7-30, "The Improvement of Farm 
Grounds," Prof. F. A. Waugh. The dedication ex- 
ercises are as follows :— Address of welcome, Presi- 
dent K. L. Butterfield; acceptance of buildings. M. 
F. Dickinson, chairman of the building committee ; 
William H. Bowker will speak of Henry S. French 
and the Durfee plant house ; Prof. E. A. White will 
speak on "The Development of the Glass House Pro- 
ject." This will be followed by an address on "What 
the Green House has done for Horticulture." given 
by J. K. M. L. Farquhar of Boston. There will 
also be a flower exhibit. 



Alumni. 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY ALUMNI REUNION. 

The eighth annual reunion of the Connecticut Valley 
Alumni Association was held at the Allyn House. 
Hartford. Conn, on Friday evening, Feb. 19. 

Present were President Kenyon L. Butterfield, 
Prof W P. Brooks, Edwin B. Smead '71. J. B. 
Minor "73, G. A. Parker 76, Dr. J. E. Root '76. 
George P. Smith '79, C. E. Beach '82, J. S. Wil- 
liams '82. C. M. Hubbard '92, Dr. C. A. Goodrich 
'93 J H. Putnam '94, A. S. Kinney, A. B. Cook 
'96 J S. Eaton '98. J. B. Henry '01 , W. B. 
Hatch '05, L. H. Moseley '06. F. A. Cutter '07. 
C F Allen '08, F. T. Hutchings '08. 

Dr. Charles A. Goodrich "93. president, gave a 
brief history of the organization. He then called on 
President Butterfield who told the alumni of the prog- 
ress made by the college in recent years and what 
was needed for its further advancement. He said 



that it is hoped to establish during the year or in the 
near future a forestry department, add an up-to-date 
poultry plant and give a course in rural sociology ; 
also to Increase the scope of the graduate school. 
Great stress was laid on the need of an athletic field. 
The members present expressed themselves as 
strongly in favor and willing to bring to bear any 
power which they might have towards securing and 
fitting out an athletic field. 

Other speakers were Prof. W. P. Brooks, J. S. 
Williams '82, J. S. Eaton '98, J. B. Minor '73. F. 

A. Cutter '07, G. A. Parker, J. E. Root '76 and J. 

B. Henry '01. 

It was unanimously voted to send a copy of the fol- 
lowing motion, made by Dr. Root, to the legislative 
committee having the appropriation for the college 
under discussion : 

"■Mooed, that we, graduates of Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, assembled at the annual meet- 
ing of the Connecticut Valley Alumni Association, 
and representing the several classes from the enter- 
ing '71 to the last class'08, most earnestly and sin- 
cerely request that sufficient appropriation be 
granted to enable the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege to provide for its different needs, the want of 
which has handicapped many of its graduates in after 

life." 

The officers elected for the ensuing year are as 
follows: President, G. A. Parker '76; Vice-presi- 
dents, J. S. Eaton '98,andC. M. Hubbard '92; Sec- 
retary, W. B. Hatch '05 ; Treasurer, A. S. Kinney 
'96. 

At a meeting of the Society of Chemical Industry 
in Boston on Feb. 5, addresses were made by 
W. H. Bowker. Professor Wellington, and Director 
Wheeler of the Rhode Island Experiment Station. 
Mr. H. D. Haskins was also present. 

'72.— The will of the late Dr. John C. Cutter of 
Worcester specifies a bequest of $1000 to the Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College for the purchase of 
books on Hygiene. Part of his estate is left to the 
town of Warren for the development of a children's 
playground The remainder goes to Harvard College. 

'76.— The park men of New England met at Hart- 
ford, Conn., Feb. 26, and formed the eastern branch 
of the National Park Superintendents' Association. 
Sixteen were present at the meeting held in Hue- 



bleln's hotel, being the guests of George A. Parker 
superintendent of the Hartford parks. John A. Pet- 
tigrew of Boston was elected president and Mr. 
Parker of Hartford, secretary. 

'83. — S. M. Holman visited collage recently in 
company with the committee on Agriculture. 

'97.— In a bulletin entitled "The Cold Waves of 
South-Central Wisconsin." recently issued by the 
Wisconsin Academy of Science, Arts and Letters, 
James L. Bartlett gives a well-written discussion of 
this subject, and clearly illustrates his points with 
charts. 

'02.— Better Fruit, the leading horticultural maga- 
zine of the Pacific coast, publishes an excellent por- 
trait of Prof. C. I. Lewis, and speaks of him as "one 
of the ablest horticulturists of the Northwest, who 
is doing a work of Inestimable value for the fruit 
Industry of Oregon." 

'03.— H. J. Franklin is the author of an article on 
cranberry insects in a recent number of the Journal 
of Economic Entomology. 

'04.— In a pamphlet catalogue, recently received 
of the Baron De Hirsch Agricultural School at 



Woodbine. N. J., j. William Gregg, Professor of 
Horticulture, outlines the work of his department. 

'06. — H. M. Russell, who has been at Miami, 
Fla.. since the first of the year, is now at Orlando, 
but will probably be sent to California in a month or 
two. 

'07.— Some of tne class who have sent In their 
second class letters would like to know if all have 
done so and If not ask to make a special effort to do 
so in order that the plan may not fail so soon after 
graduation. Why not keep together even if we are 
out of college? [Signed] Clinton King. 

'07.— A very attractive advertising pamphlet 
entitled "Preserving Trees" has been issued by F. 
A. Cutter & Co. of Orange, N. J. Mr. Cutter is 
soliciting all lines of landscape gardening and tree- 
work. 

'08.— B. W. Bangs of New Jersey spent Wash- 
ington's birthday with his parents. Mr. and Mrs. E. I. 
Bangs of Amherst. 

Ex- '09.— Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Stuart visited col- 
lege, Saturday, Feb. 13. He is managing his father's 
farm In Athol. 



M. A. C. BANNERS. 
3 ft. by 6 ft., - . . $4.00 

Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DBUEVS DRUO ®TO»JH> 



I 







I 



■36 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOR MEN 




A Year in College 



I250 cash or a year in College can be easily earned by 
one young man or lady in each county by September 
1909. Flan does not interfere with other employment 
and student can select the school. 

State name of institution you wish to attend. No 
money required. 

For Farticulars address, 

Morton H. Femberton, 

Columbia, Missouri. 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

AIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Ralw's 3n«t 

ON South Street, off Main, • NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 
Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 FEH DAT. 

When in " H»mp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAH AR. 



INTER-COLLEGIATE BUREAU OF ACADEMIC COSTUME 

C ollese Caps and Gowns. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 



Hmneist Rouse Mm Si 



Four First Class Barbers 



QROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, Confectionery and Fruit, 



Open Mondays from 


J A. M. 


to 8 P. M 


Tuesdays ; 


. M 


6 " 


Wednesdays, ; 


r " 


8 " 


Thursdays, 5 


M 


6 " 


Fridays, ; 


r " 


8 " 


Saturdays, ; 


. M 


11 " 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Kxcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. %% Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our PartOtoar Literature |g sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



" For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER 



IK COE-mORTrHIER HOTIir. 



34-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

lUnnfadrntn and Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It la generally conceded 
that the cluba equipped 
by WRIGHT & DrfsSoN 
have the beat looking, 
beat fitting and moat 
durable aulta. 

The WRIGHT A DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
eaaily the fine.tt. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweater*. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIOHT «Ss DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON -ST., BOSTON 
18 WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 
Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

^- A. THOMPSON. 

Rear First National Bank. AMHERST 




CapsandGoir>ns 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Av , New York. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Coanectiatttvallca Street Baiiwau Co. 

AMBMMBT DIVISION. 

will >«ve*8J0A.« VHci(i Gul! ,, 1IlI) MAM . 
John A.TaKgart.Supt. 

^on^Twalko^your Heels 

To sav» your >olt. Come to me lor your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

OrrosiTB Town Hall. 

/ShersuTswidfirlanrstreet Railway Go. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.80 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 



DENTAL* ROOMS. 



CUTLBR'S BLOCK. 



AMHERST, MASS 



£. B. DICKINBDN, D. D. B. 

DENTAL B.00MS. 

„„ ^ •— AMHKRST, MASS 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - • *"" ' 

OFFICE HOCB8: 

e to la a.. **., l-ao to e. v. M- 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide G» administered when desired 



BUY 

GOOD 

CLOTHES 



"Central Vtmont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, WW. 

SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Spriugfleld, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.18 p. m, 
express, and 5.38 p. m. The 5 88 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 



Order your Suit or Flannel Trousers of 
Labrovitz, Tailor. Pay a fair price for 
your clothes and have the satisfaction of 
being dressed as well as the next man. 

The new SPRING and SUMMER 
patterns have arrived and invite attention. 
I guarantee a perfect fit. Also the best 
trimmings and workmanship. 

Order your Spring Suit now. 

Full Dress Suits to rent. 

Dyeing, Pressing and Altering neatly 
done. 



NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 

6.20 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J J. W. HANLEY, 

General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



I. M. LABROVITZ 

TAILOR STORE 

i, Amity St. :: Amherst 

Telephone, 54-4 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

5f7 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigara Noted for ita excellent 

Oyeter Stew and clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



V. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ulnerer 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



Kiraa Street, 



NORTHARFTON, MAIS. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



POWERS, 
THE TAILOR. 

Has received the latest fabrics for the spring and summer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladles' 
Garments In a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

Kf-Mllitary Work a Specialty.^! 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhekst, Mass. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



M. A. C. '82, 



FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



AMHEKST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 

Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICE8. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpel RenovatJn£ Establishment 



JVI.A..O. Afcf't, 



O. **. YVKltls, •<>» 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

««r3ATI»PAOTION OUAJtANTBBD.C^ 

JT. A. VTLMY, Sr«tMsw. 

OFFICE ! 

FleaaMfcxxt Street. 



Your Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATGH MAKER 



1 1 Amity St., 



Amherst, Mass. 



Mainsprings, i year 
Clean.ng;, J,^ 

Prompt reliable work at Lowest Prices. 



The Children are Happy. 

Because their clothes are made on the New Hone i)t«n<i 

Machihe, which fact, assure* them of i.o "rli.*" Mothers 

ahould ret one at once at It will do for their children In rear. 

to come. Dealers Everywhere. ln y * ,r * 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 




OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



I^m^T L- H- ToUBT«Lorr«. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DBALEKS AMD JOBBER* IH 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Clans and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE 



142 Main Street, 



Northampton , Mass 




Tel. 332-2. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Lareest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



Uniform* 
for all 
Athletic 
Sports 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



Official 
Implements 

for ell 
Track and 
Field Sportt 

Spalding's handsomely Illustrated catalogue of 

all sport, contains numerous suggestions 

Mailed free anywhere 

A. Q. SPALDINO & BROS. 
73 Federal St., - ■ Boston. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, A MHERST, MASS 

PLUHBE1. STEW & BBS FITTER, 

IH DEALER II STOVES III MIMES. 



Shop 15 i-* North Plbasant St. 



Telephone 36-1*. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Left at Amherst House Will Raceive Prompt Attention 



Orders 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLBTK LINK OK GOODS 
Sl'ITKI) TO THE STUDENTS* WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1861. 

EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPOBTKK8 ANI> MAKUKACTUBKBR OK 

O. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and Sclentlfle Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 

We handle the beat of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 

E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - . Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



LEW 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for J1.50. 

GERARD. N. LEW 

'9 PLEASANT ST. REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 

A FULL LINE OF 

Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MAS8. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 






AflHa$f , Ma«, 




THE 



flfoassacbueette 
HQricultural 

Golleae 



■ AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



— ♦ 



1 SHOUT COURSES as follows i 

f.1 A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both ^sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish ~rt*«f * *»? 
claractr. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Sf it Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two /eeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
hth schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
wfth heTarger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for al persons 
desiring to Lprove the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agncul- 
ture and horticulture. 

o A T-OTJB YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
Admission granted on ce.... • ate from approved high schools and academies. Reqmred 
ftu^s during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, studen* 
.tudies a™"* h . work< Courseg are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 

™^%227X^ Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening Botany, Veterin- 
^M^^^^ «*"»»• Cm E ^ eeri ^ Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary exp- uses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



M 



' 



aol 



Cou, 



'*«?e. 



THE COLLE&E SIGNAL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 12 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 




COLLEGE 




AMHERST, MASS.. MARCH 24. 1909 



I 



— 




We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



Page's SDoc Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARG 



STOCK 



Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




E. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VIOLIN, BANJO, IKlRKlDOlilN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 
best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 
branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

190 Pearl St., - Hartford, Conn. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 24. 1909 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Students anc I Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collio. S.ohal. Amhust Mass Th. S.oiial will b. 

ZX b2S ^ " d " con,inu4nce '• ordered and — - ■"* ■*— ••»*■»- — . ™£ZJZZZ2L 5 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. Editor-in-Chief. 
E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager. 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911, Assistant Business Manaeer 
HENRY A. BROOKS, 1910, College Notes. LOUIS C BROWN loin 

JOS1AH C. FOLSOM. 1910, Alumni Notes. PARK w ALLFN ioi i 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911, College Notes. HERBERT W BLANEY 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. Circulation Department. 
ALBERT W. DODCE. 1912. Circulation Department. 



Athletic Notes. 
Department Notes. 
1911, Special. 



Terms, tl.OO per near In adcenc. Single Co plee, Toe l Portage oof la, p j United Statae and 



Canada, S»c. extra. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-Bail Association, 
Base- Bali Association. 
Track Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate, 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
■ R. H. Allen, Manager. 

R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke. Manager. 
R. S. Eddy, Manager. 
Hockey Association. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 
Tennis Association. 
L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad, Pres. 
H. W. Blaney. Manager. 
F. T. Haynes. Pnsa. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 
F. L. Thomas, Manager. 



Entered aa second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Editor. &ls. 



This issue of the Signal Is the first attempt of the 
new board of editors. The absence of our editor-in- 
chief adds to the difficulty in its publication. Over- 
look what errors there are and watch for the improve- 
ments in later editions. You will find them. 

It is the custom tor the new board of editors to 
give the retiring board a "pat on the back." We 
are sticking to the same custom, for we can do it 
conscientiously and with the knowledge that it is the 
true opinion of the thousands who have read the Sig- 
nals during the past year. Most of this credit is due 
to the untiring efforts of our ex-editor-in-chief, Her- 
bert L. White, who has given much time and hard 
work to its publication and followed closely the senti- 
ment of the college pertaining to all matters. He 
has set a high mark for it and has kept it well up to 
this mark. All changes made during the past year 
have been so many steps toward the further better- 



ment of our paper ; more will be made from time to 
time. Watch for them and tell us what you think of 
them. We will not stint ourselves in the least to 
keep the College Signal the representative organ 
of our college. 

Theories as to its true object are varied. The fol- 
lowing clipping was taken from one of our monthly 
exchanges: "Will not some kind friend present the 
College Signal with a story?" All such as will be 
received will be promptly and "regretfully" returned, 
or kept for publication in the M. A. C. monthly 
which is yet to appear. Here is a chance for some- 
one. Our work is to present to the reader in just as 
fresh a form as possible all facts pertaining to and of 
interest to the college. If you have any ideas or any 
criticisms to m?ke, come around to the office and 
present them to us. We are always ready to talk 
business and will promise you all possible attention. 
In this way the editors will know the true sentiment 
of the college; and that is what this paper must 
express. 



I 



138 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*39 




The Summer School is generally considered to 
have been a success in the past two years. Those 
who have been on the ground have unanimously 
understood it to be a good thing and valuable to the 
college in many ways. Everyone now regards it as a 
permanent institution at M. A. C. and capable both 
of doing good throughout the country and of bringing 
credit on the institution. It is also a first class 
means of advertising the college; and the school 
teachers who come here in the summer are already 
sending in a number of men for the four year course. 
In the future they are certain to send many more. 

Under these circumstances, it would seem that the 
Summer School is worthy of the support of all loyal 
M. A. C. men, — faculty, students and alumni. It Is 
well worth while to talk this scheme up amongst our 
friends and to bring as many people, of the right kind, 
here for the summer session as possible. 

Furthermore, it seems to me that the Summer 
School is worth the personal attention of a number 
of the regular four year students. Certain courses 
are well worth taking. A student who has any 
expectation of teaching after graduation, and who 
does not find it convenient to take the courses given 
by Professor Hart and Professor Jenks during the 
college year, would certainly find it worth while to 
take the summer work given by these gentlemen. A 
few of our graduates have stayed over to these 
courses in the past, and all claim to be well satisfied 
with their work. There will be a number of other 
courses this year which it will be worth while for any 
college man to take, and any one who has no other 
pressing engagement for the summer can well afford 
to register for the Summer School and stay through 
July. [Signed] F. A. Wauch, 

Dean of the Summer Session. 



tee on agriculture. This co-operation itself is sig- 
nificant and constituted a powerful argument for our 
our cause. Another noticeable fact was the enthusi- 
asm shown not only for the bills which we are urging, 
but for the college and its work. Whatever the 
results are, we have the satisfaction of having made 
a strong case and of having had the loyal and earnest 
support of all the different college interests. 

I want particularly to thank the alumni who came, 
some from a considerable distance and at some sac- 
rifice of time and money, for their enthusiastic sup- 
port and their splendid evidence of college loyalty. 

Kenyon L. Butterfield. 



/Ithletic No-US- 



BASEBALL. 

The baseball season started at M. A. C. two weeks 
ago, and so far most of the practise has been indoors, 
consisting of limbering up by the whole squad. The 
pitching staff are getting their arms Into shape, and 
are already showing lots of speed. It is impossible to 
judge accurately of the progress of the other men, 
owing to the restricted nature of the practise. The 
freshmen are numerous on the squad, and some are 
very promising. The following men comprise the 
squad at present : Capt. O'Grady, Hubbard. Webb, 
Warner, French, Hosmer, Brown '10, Rockwood, 
Piper, Robinson '11, Hill, Bean, Stevenson, Bar- 
rows, Damon MI, Smith, Norris, Durling, E. Wil- 
liams, McGarr, Covill, Peckham, Oppel, Curran, 
Muller, Carpenter. Ackerman, Finnegan, Brown '12, 
Dee, Hickey, O'Flynn, Fowler. Tower, Lloyd, 
Hemenway, Merrill and Lamson. 



A WORD OF APPRECIATION 

Men who have been members of the board of 
trustees for more than a score of years say that the 
hearing before the ways and means committee 
March 18th was the best the college has ever had. 
The secret of it, I am sure, lies in the spirit of co- 
operation manifested by the large attendance, repre- 
senting students, alumni, faculty, trustees, and the 
general public, and including the legislative commit- 



BASKETBALL REVIEW 

The basketball season came to an end earlier than 
was expected, owing to the fact that our last game 
was cancelled by St. Lawrence university, on account 
of an Injury to their captain. 

Our term, of whom only two were veterans, were 
slow in striking their gait, and the first games were 
lost for lack of team work. Toward the close of the 
season, however, the men got together, and played 
fast ball. Captain Burke, '10, at forward, was the 
mainstay of the team and shone in every game. 



Neale, '09, the other veteran, played consistently 
in the backfield. His running mate, Hosmer, '10, 
did excellent guarding, and also found time to do a 
little scoring occasionally. It was a difficult matter 
to find a partner for Burke; Moreau, '12, Turner, 
'12, and Pearson, '12, all trying it. The two first 
named played in four games each, and Pearson in 
enough to make his letter. Schermerhorn, '10, and 
Oppel '12, were evenly matched at center, and both 
played in at least five games. 

No little credit is due the scrub team which did much 
for the success of the regulars. Their hard and earn- 
est endeavor is appreciated by the varsity, for without 
their aid the season would have been a dismal failure. 
The following are this year's B M B men: E. J. 
Burke, '10, of Holyoke; H. J. Neale, '09, of Wor- 
cester; L. G. Schermerhorn, MO, of Kingston, R. I. ; 
C. I. Hosmer, '10, of Turners Fails ; C. C. Pearson, 
'12, of Arlington; E. I. Oppel, '12, of Little Falls, 
N. Y. ; Manager R. C. Lindblad, *09, of Grafton. 



ATHLETIC FIELD FAVORED. 

The officers, alumni, and friends of the college 
stand back of her in good shape as was shown by the 
manner in which they presented her needs to the 
Ways and Means Committee of the Legislature last 
Thursday at Boston. The hearing was a successful 
one, full of enthusiasm and words of commendation 
for the college, its president and its students. 

The hearing was in charge of Ex-Senator Charles 
A. Gleason of Springfield, acting president of the 
State Board of Agriculture. The Athletic Field was 
the chief topic of discussion. Charts showing the 
plans of the proposed field were displayed and those 
from the college, who were present? were kept busy 
explaining matters. 

Among those speaking in favor of the appropriation 
were Chairman Gates of the Committee on Agricul- 
ture, and Representatives Avery, Walker, Kinney, 
Prouty, Gardner and Holeman of the same commit- 
tee ; also Representative Hosmer of the Ways and 
Means Committee. Bartlett and Alger, '09, pre- 
sented the views of the student body. President 
Butterfield was repeatedly on his feet answering the 
queries, and the investigation into the case was most 
thorough. In addition to the speakers named above, 



the Committee heard also Mr. Bosworth of Spring- 
field, Ex -Senator Hall of Revere (a graduate of the 
college), Dr. Fernald of the college. Secretary Ells- 
worth of the State Board of Agriculture, Mr. Bliss of 
Attleboro (a graduate), Mr. Frost, who spoke partic- 
ularly of fruit forestry and water-power, Prof. W. T. 
Sedgwick of the Institute of Technology, Professor 
Brooks of the college, Atherton Clark of R. H. 
Stearns &. Co., (a son of the late president William 
S. Clark), Representative Blanchard of Somerville, 
(who wanted to be recorded for the bill), Trustee and 
Alumnus W. H. Bowker of Boston, George H. 
Ellis of Newton, (another trustee), Mr. Thomas, head 
of the Connecticut Poultry association, who spoke 
for the stock-judging pavilion, Ex-representative 
Preston of Danvers (who is a trustee), Mr. Fells, for 
poultry culture, Marquis F. Dickinson, a trustee, and 
many more. As President Butterfield says, "what- 
ever the results are we have the satisfaction of hav- 
ing made a strong case and of having had the loyal 
and earnest support of all the different college 
interests.'' 



Colleg? NotfS- 



Prof. C. H. Fernald celebrated his 71st birthday, 
March 16. 

The Q. T. V. Fraternity held an informal smoker 
in their rooms March 15. 

Albert R. Jenks 'II, has been called home by the 
serious illness of his mother. 

Walter R. Clark '10, has recovered from a pro- 
longed attack of pneumonia and is convalescing at his 
home at Milton-on-the-Hudson, New York. 

The Senior Class has appointed a committee of 
three to present recommendations of methods of in- 
ducing more athletes to come to this college. 

Davis R. Dewey has been appointed by Governor 
Draper as trustee of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College in place of the late Carroll D. Wright. 

The Vesper service on Sunday March 14, was ad- 
dressed by the Rev. J. Rolfe Stevenson of New York 
City who spoke very Interestingly upon the subject of 
"Be ye ready also." A solo was rendered by W. 
D. Barlow '09. 




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141 







The Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity held a Smoker 
in its rooms Monday evening March 15, in commem- 
oration of the 36th anniversity of its foundation. 

Owing to the illness of Mr. McFarland, he was un- 
able to address the assembly of March 17. The 
hour was given over to a mass meeting of the students. 

Several students of the college attended the illus- 
trated lecture given by Charles J. Glidden at College 
Hall on the evening of March 15. Mr. Glidden lec- 
tured upon "An Automobile Trip Around the World. " 

E.C.Worman, Yale '08, College Y.M.C.A. Secre- 
tary ot Massachusetts and Rhode Island, was at College 
for two days last week conferring with the officers 
and committees of the Association. He led the 
Thursday evening prayer meeting. The association 
is planning great things for the coming year. Come 
out and give them your hearty support. 

Prof. William T. Sedgwick addressed the Assembly 
March 10. speaking on "Charles Darwin." Profes- 
sor Sedgwick mentioned as the theory on which 
Darwin began his work "that there were more crea- 
tures born into the world than can possibly survive," 
which is the natural way of accounting for the multi- 
tudinous fossil remains and living forms. Among the 
traits of the great scientist, Professor Sedgwick 
mentioned great patience, perseverance, courteous- 
ness and his great kindness. 

At a meeting of the Y. M. C. A. on Thursday 

evening. March 11, the following officers for the 

ensuing year were elected : President, Frank T. 

Haynes; vice-president. Henry A. Brooks; treasurer. 

Arthur W. Holland ; corresponding secretary. Alden 

C. Brett; recording secretary, Frank B. Hills; 

auditor, Ralph J. Watts, '07. Following are the 

newly appointed chairmen of the various committees: 

Advisory, President K. L. Butterfield. Bible Study, 

Arthur W. Holland; Prayer-meeting, J. C. Bailey; 

Membership, H. A. Brooks; Handbook, E. F. 

Damon; Reception, H. W. French ; Musical, R. A. 

Waldron. 



The Rifle Club has entered a team in the Intercol- 
legiate Championship Match held under the auspices 
of the National Rifle Association of America during 
the week of March 19-26. The rules governing the 
match are as follows : 



Target: N. R. A. target with a one-inch bull's- 
eye. 

Number of Shots: Twenty for record ; two sight- 
ing shots and ten shots for record at the standing and 
prone position. To be shot in strings of five. The 
entire team must shoot at the same time. 

Positions : Standing, off hand, body free from all 
support; Prone, head toward target. Shot without 

use of strap. 

Rifle: Any 22 caliber with the sight in front of the 

hammer. 

Ammunition \ 22 caliber shot. 

Eligibility: Competitors shall be in full academic 
standing in the undergraduate years of the institution 
represented. Certificates to be furnished by some 
duly authorized authority. 

Prizes : The Championship trophy presented by the 
Forest, Fish and Game Society of America, to be 
held by the college or university represented by the 
winning team for one year, when it will again be put 
in competition by the National Rifle Association of 
America; and medals to the individual members of 

the team. 

The trophy will become the property of the college 
or university winning it three years, not necessarily in 
succession. 

Over fifty men have been out for the team and, 
during the past month, daily practice has been carried 
on. March 13 the fifteen men having the highest 
averages composed a team which shot against a team 
from the faculty, and the ten highest scores on the 
the club team averaged 41.4. 

George W. Paulsen '10 of New York City, has 
been elected captain and having had considerable ex- 
perience in rifle practics with the New York National 
Guard is fast perfecting the organization of the team. 
Lieut. Bardwell of Amherst, holder of the World's 
Record at 200 yards in 1895, has kindly given his 
services as coach and under his direction the work is 
showing great improvement. 

The Club has had the best of support from the 
students and also from the faculty, many of whom 
have already joined the club and also have shown a 
great interest in the shooting. 

Captain Martin is especially enthusiastic over the 
showing the men are making and predicts a victory 
for the team. 



The men who are now working under the coach are 
Paulsen '10, Noble '09, MacGown '09, Holland '10, 
Everson '10, Beeman '10. Haywood '10. McLaugh- 
lin '11, Sharpe '11, Baker ' 1 1 , Stevenson Ml, 
Racicot 'II, Brett '12, Eisenhaure '12, Sanctuary 
'12, Floyd '12. 



FARMERS' INSTITUTE. 

The farmers' institute was a success. The total 
registration numbered 1 65 up to Friday noon and 
many more came after that time. Wednesday was 
taken up by lectures on " Livestock and Dairying, " 
Mr. P. H. Smith of the experiment station gave an 
address on "The Grain Problem." "The Cost of 
Cream and Milk Production," was taken up by Dr. 
J. B. Lindsey. Professor W. P. B. Lockwood 
talked on "Care and Handling of Market Milk." In 
the afternoon R. L. Gribben spoke on "Judging 
Dairy Cattle." going over some of the animals at the 
barn and showing what to look for and what to avoid. 
After this there was a demonstation of Babcock test 
and Centrifugal cream separators by Professor Lock- 
wood and Messrs. Huntington and Coons. In the 
evening thtre was an address by President Butterfield 
at 7-30 and at 8 John H. Robinson of Boston lect- 
ured on the subject "Poultry on Massachusetts 
Farms. In the evening the college orchestra gave a 
few selections. 

Thursday was devoted to field crops. The attend- 
ance was larger than on Wednesday on account of 
the change in weather. The first speaker was Sidney 
B. Haskell whose subject was "Grasses, Clovers and 
Alfalfa." He said that these crops yield only about 
25 per cent of what might be obtained. The various 
varieties were discussed and at the end of his dis- 
course he touched upon the growing of alfalfa on Mas- 
sachusetts farms. 

Mr. N. H. Brewer of Hockanum, Ct. was next 
introduced. Mr. Brewer won the first prize for the 
'argest yield of corn per acre and he called forth much 
interest. He made it evident that New England can 
grow better corn than is grown in the great corn states 
of the middle west. He spent much time in answer- 
ing practical questions. His subject was "Corn 
Growing in New England." He told of his expen- 
se, his methods of planting, methods of cultivation 
and of fertilization. His prize yield was 133 1-3 



bushels from an acre sown on May 22 and harvested 
Sept. 10th. 

Prof. William P. Brooks, Director of the Experi- 
ment Station, was the next speaker. His subject was 
"Fertilization of Corn and Grass." He gave special 
attention to grass and clover. He touched on 
methods for eliminating weeds. At the close of the 
talk the subject was discussed by members present. 
The first part of the afternoon was given to corn 
judging. Growers from the surrounding towns 
exhibited samples. Prof. J. A. Foord judged the 
Dent corn and N. H. Brewer the Flint varieties. 
Ribbons were awarded as follows : — 

Yellow Dent— 1st, Frank T. Potter of South 
Deerfield; 2nd. T. E. Brigham of Amherst; 3rd, 
Geo. P. Smith of Sunderland. 

White Dent— 1st, Wm. P. Brooks of Amherst; 
2nd. Henry T. Whitcomb of Amherst; 2rd, no entry 
Flint— 1st. G. S. Goodrich of West Newbury; 
2nd, M. P. Marsh of Amherst; 3rd, D. B. Russell 
of Montague. 

The evening exercises were in Clark Hall. Pro- 
fessor Hart gave an address on "Some Reasons for 
Teaching Agriculture in Schools. " Mr. Floyd B.Jenks 
gave an illustrated lecture on "Actual Work In 
School Agriculture." The college quartet rendered 
a few selections. 

Friday, the last day of the institute and the last 
day of the short course, was given up to the Horticul- 
tural department. Elmer D. Howe, one of the 
trustees presided at all meetings. Mr. H. F. 
Thompson spoke on "The Farmer's Garden." 
After this Wilfred Wheeler of Concord gave a talk on 
"Strawberries as as a Paying Farm Crop." He 
estimated that a profit of $300 could be made on an 
acre, Prof. F. C. Sears gave a demonstration of apple 
packing. He discussed the different methods of 
packing and grading and the different materials used. 
The afternoon was given over to the dedication of 
French Hall and the Durfee greenhouses. President 
Butterfield gave the address of welcome and spoke 
of the erection of these buildings as being a great 
advance in the college. 

Mr. Dickinson, the chairman of the building com- 
mittee of the trustees, was then introduced. He told 
some reminiscences from his boyhoood of the land 
now occupied by the college. He said he believed 



142 



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•43 



■ * 



II 






that now no other college in the country is so well 
equipped along Horticultural lines. Mr. Bowker, the 
next speaker gave a short sketch of the lives of Henry 
F. French and Nathan Durfee in whose honor the 
new buildings were named. Mr. French was presi- 
dent of the college from Nov. 29, 1863 to Sept. 
29, 1866. 

Prof. E. A. White then gave a talk on "The 
Development of the Greenhouse Project." The pre- 
sent building is but a part of the building planned. 
J. K. M. L. Farquhar gave an interesting, illus- 
trated talk on "What the Greenhouse has done for 
Horticulture." He gave views of greenhouses in 
foreign countries. 

In connection with the dedication exercises there 
was a flower show. Flowers were received from 
many Massachusetts growers. Besides a large col- 
lection of roses, carnations, violets and sweet peas, 
there were several signs made by the members of the 
senior class in floriculture. 

The concluding address was one by Prof. F. A. 
Waugh on "The Improvement of Farm Grounds. " 
He showed a large number of slides which have been 
prepared for this work and explained how to improve 

the appearance of the farm grounds. 

>•> — 

INFORMAL 

The informals, the best element in the social life 
of the college, are becoming more popular than ever 
in M. A. C. During the past month, two of the best 
informals in the history of the college have been held. 

On Saturday, March 20 about sixty couples gath- 
ered in the prettily decorated Drill Hall and enjoyed 
themselves to the highest degree. The hall was fes- 
tooned with red and white streamers of bunting with 
many college banners decorating the walls. The 
floor was well banked about the corners and doorways 
with palms and potted plants furnished by the depart- 
ment of Horticulture. The patronesses' corner was 
prettily set off by a large American flag and potted 

plants. 

The patronesses were : Mrs. A. V. Osmun, Mrs. 
C. E. Gordon, Miss Joslin of Smith College and 
Miss Goddard from Mt. Holyoke College. 

Derrick's Westfield Orchestra funished the musical 
program and dance music. The dancing was pre- 
ceded by an informal reception and concert by the 
orchestra. 



Those who attended were: 1909— W. D. Barlow, 
G. M. Codding. L. S. Corbett. H. P. Crosby, S. S. 
Crossman, G. R. Fulton, W. L. Ide, W. W. Hay- 
ward, R. C. Lindblad, H. G. Noble, J. Noyes, 
H. D. Phelps, R. C. Potter, C. R. Webb; 1910— 
R. H. Allen, R. P. Armstrong, J. C. Bailey, J. P. 
Blaney, L. Brandt, H. A. Brooks, L. C. Brown, 
W. A. Cloues, H. T. Cowles, L. S. Dickinson, E. 
F. Damon. S. C. Brooks. R. S. Eddy, J.N. Ever- 
son, F. T. Haynes, M. S. Hazen, W. E. Leonard. 
L. S. McLaine, F. P. Nickless, F. L. Thomas, E. 

H. Turner. R. A. Waldron ; 191 1-H. W. Blaney, 

N. H. Hill, H. H. Howe. L. M. Johnson, E. A. 

Larrabee. C. A. Lodge. Jr., G. P. Nickerson. A. H. 

Sharpe.L. O. Stevenson. R. L. Whitney, E. L. 

Winn . 1912— W. J. Blrdsell, J. W. Covill, E. B. 

Eastman. Jr., J. M. Heald, F. B. Hills, M. C. 

Pratt. 0. V. Lowry, S. P. Puffer. A. N. Raymond, 

B. G. Southwick. H. C. Walker, E. I. Wilde; W. 

S. Regan. R. D. Whitmarsh, P. V. Goldsmith. 



April 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

March 25— Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m. in Chapel. 

Debating Club. 7-45 p. m., in Chapel. 
26—6-00 p. m. to April 5, 1-00 p. m., Spring 
Recess. 
6— Stockbridge Club, 7 p. m.. in Agricul- 
ture Room. 
7— Assembly, 1-15 p. m. in Chapel. 
8_Y. M. C. A.. 645 p. m. In Chapel. 

Debating Club, 7-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
10— Baseball. Rhode Island State vs. M. A. C. 

on Campus. 
11 —Bible Study, 4 p. m. 

Vespers, 5 p. m.. in Chapel. 
13— Stockbridge Club, 7 p. m., in Agriculture 
Room. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

13. Faculty Changes. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '87. 

It was stated in the eighth sketch that Clark, Stock- 
bridge, Snell and Goodell constituted the origtna. 
faculty. Professor Snell, being connected with Am- 
herst College, was engaged to teach mathematics 
only during the first year. His successor, Samuel 



Miller, of Chicago, entered upon his duties in the fall 
of 1868. Professor Miller was a graduate of Amherst 
College, and had had many years of experience as a 
civil engineer, engaged In locating and building rail- 
roads in the West. He died in October, 1870, of a 
cancerous affection of the bowels. The eighth annual 
report of the trustees said of him, — That he was very 
industrious and found time, besides performing his 
duties as Instructor with rare fidelity and success, to 
engage in many other affairs of importance; that he 
surveyed the line of the Massachusetts Central Rail- 
road from Belchertown to Northampton ; that he 
assisted in locating and grading numerous walk's and 
roads in Amherst; that he prepared a plan for the In- 
troduction of water from Pelham ; that he wrote a 
prize essay on the highways of the State and the best 
method of constructing and repairing them ; that he 
originated the idea of establishing true meridian lines 
in different parts of the Commonwealth, and requiring 
all surveys to be made with reference to them ; and 
that to lose a man of his noble character, large ex- 
perience, and intellectual ability, was a great calamity 
to both the college and the Commonwealth. 

Professor Miller was succeeded by two gentlemen 
who served temporarily as instructors: Martin H. 
Fisk and John K. Richardson. In July, 1871, the 
trustees having secured Prof. Selim H. Peabody,of 
Chicago, as professor of physics and civil engineering, 
arranged that he begin his duties the first of Sep- 
tember. Professor Peabody was a graduate of the 
University of Vermont, had had much experience in 
teaching, and was well known In the West as an 
author of repute. In July. 1874, the trustees accepted 
the resignation of Prof. Peabody, and passed a vote 
placing on record their high appreciation of his faithful 
and efficient services and their deep regret that cir- 
cumstances rendered his withdrawal from the college 
faculty a necessity. At this meeting Prof. William 
B. Graves, of Marietta College. Ohio, was appointed 
his successor. 

In May, 1868, the trustees elected Professor 
Charles A. Goessmann, of Syracuse, N. Y., pro- 
fessor of chemistry, his term of service to begin the 
first of January following. Professor Goessmann was 
graduated from the University of Gottingen, Germany, 
where he taught analytical and organic chemistry for 
five years after his graduation. For six years prior to 



his coming to Amherst he had the superintendence of 
the manufacture of salt at the works of the Onondaga 
Salt Company, near Syracuse, N. Y., and by the Im- 
provements there Introduced, as well as by his pub- 
lished memoirs upon the salines and salt deposits of 
the country, he won a wide reputation as a practical 
and scientific chemist. Dr. Goessmann's life work in 
Amherst is too well-known to require any comment at 
this time. 

Early in 1 869 the positions of professorship of agri- 
culture and of farm superintendent were established 
and the duties of each defined. Professor Stock- 
bridge continued in the former position, and the latter 
position was filled temporarily by Capt. A. J. Marks, 
and then for several years by John C. Dillon. John 
Griffin served as gardener in 1869-71, when he was 
succeeded by Willard C. Ware of the Class of '71. 
In April, 1873, Samuel T. Maynard of the Class of 
72 succeeded Mr. Ware as gardener, and in Janu- 
ary following was promoted assistant professor of horti- 
culture. 

Our late President Goodell was the pioneer in 
charge of the department of gymnastics and military 
tactics. His successor was Capt. Henry E. Alvord, 
U. S. A., later very prominent in agricultural circles, 
who served two years and then resigned from the 
army. He was succeeded by First Lieut. A. H. 
Merrill, 1st Art., U. S. A. His detail of three years 
having expired, President Grant appointed First Lieut. 
C. A. L. Totten, U. S. A., as his successor. 

The trustees in August, 1870, elected Professor 
Henry W. Parker, who had achieved a most enviable 
record in Iowa College, professor of "mental, moral and 
social science. He was given charge of the moral 
and religious instruction of the college, and the special 
training of the senior class in mental philosophy and 
original declamation. 

In July, 1871, President Clark was instructed to 
secure a professor of veterinary science, who should be 
competent to teach physiology, zoology and com- 
parative anatomy, the principles of breeding domestic 
animals together with the various branches of veter- 
inary medicine and surgery, and who should be skilful 
in the use of the compound microscope. An un- 
successful attempt was made to get Prof. John 
Gamgee of England to fill this chair. The following 
February (1872) Prof. Henry James Clark, of Lex- 



144 



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"45 



ington, Ky., was elected and began his duties at the 
opening of the next college year. Professor Clark 
died July 1st, 1873, in the 48th year of his age. The 
eleventh annual report of the trustees said of him, — 
That the public at large could with difficulty appre- 
ciate the loss to the college and to the world, resulting 
from the death of so accomplished a scientist in the 
very prime of life j that in 1865 he published " Mind 
in Nature," or "The Origin of Life, and Mode of 
Development of Animals," which was, perhaps, his 
most important work, and which at once established 
his reputation throughout the scientific world ; and that 
he was pronounced by Professor Agassiz to be the 
most skilful and reliable microscopist in the country. 
Professor Noah Cressy, M. D.,of Middletown, Conn., 
was elected successor to Professor Clark. He was 
an enthusiastic student, with a valuable library and a 
cabinet of choice specimens of comparative anatomy, 
and was ambitious to excell in his chosen profession. 

Other instructors who served during the period 
covered by this sketch, 1868-1876, were: H. S. 
Barlow, Elihu Root and Robert M. Woods, in rheto- 
ric and elocution; and George Montague, in book- 
keeping. George F. Miller and Prof. George S. 
Cheney taught vocal music. Non-resident lecturers 
during this period were : Dr. John S. Stickney, and 
Prof. James Law on diseases of domestic animals; 
Charles L. Flint, on dairy farming; Dr. Calvin Cutter, 
on hygiene; Dr. Jabez Fisher, on market gardening; 
Dr. Edward Hitchcock, on comparative anatomy ; 
Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, on the culture of fruits and 
flowers, and the art of producing new and valuable 
varieties; Hon. Joseph White, on civil polity; Dr. A- 
S. Packard, Jr., on useful and injurious insects; 
Prof. E. S. Snell, on physics; Dr. George B. Loring, 
on stock farming; Prof. L. Clark Seelye, on English 
literature; George B. Emerson, on arboriculture; 
Alonzo Bradley, on the honey bee; Marquis F. 
Dickinson, Jr.. on rural law; Prof. Wm. R. Ware, 
on architecture and its application to rural affairs ; Dr. 
Samuel J. Parker, on fruit culture; and Prof. Rich- 
ard H. Mather, on sculpture and German literature. 

In January, 1876, the trustees granted President 
Clark leave of absence from May 15th to the begin- 
ning of the college year in 1877, to enable him to 
visit Japan. To reduce expenses they vacated the 
chair of veterinary science and made no provision for 
instruction in music or elocution after July 1st. 



SOME "MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES" WHOM 
I KNOW. 

I am a grandson of Yale and a great grandson of 
Harvard ; while fitting for the latter institution, Pres- 
ident Clark's earnest advertising of M. A. C. in the 
summer of 1878 led my Yale progenitor to decide on 
a different line of education to fit me for the study of 
medicine ; as founder and many years officer of the 
M. A. C. Club of New York and as a grand officer 
for nineteen years of my fraternity which is one of 
nearly thirty national bodies doing "social service," 
1 have become acquainted with many M. A. C. men; 
further, the state of "freedom" that obtains in the 
childless widower fast approaching the age of fifty 
years, puts upon me the obligation of letting others 
know of the men whose life work I am so fortunate 
as to be well acquainted with ; the sketches will fol- 
low as the spirit moves and opportunity serves; class 
and fraternity distinctions have nothing to do with 
their order ; that the majority of the men sketched 
may have other occupations than pure agriculture 
will be due to the fact that my profession has drawn 
me away from the "most ancient and noble of call- 
ings" ; it is desired to demonstrate that the educa- 
tional foundation laid by Wilder, Hitchcock, French, 
Chadbourne, Clark and Stockbridge was good and the 
structure built by Clark, Stockbridge, Goessmann, 
Goodell, Snell, Miller, Peabody, Parker, Totten and 
others is permanent, for In the lifework of the alumni 
must the proof be found. 

I. Winfield Ayres, B. Sc, M. D., was born at 
Oakham, in 1864; fitted for college at Phillips 
Andover and entered class of 1886 in its sophomore 
year; D. G. K. ; captain football and baseball teams 
and of Co. A. Was graduated from Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College in 1893; house surgeon Bell- 
evue Hospital. 1894; chief of clinic in genito-urinary 
diseases and demonstrator of anatomy for seven years 
at Bellevue Hospital Medical College; adjunct pro- 
fessor of genito-urinary diseases since 1901 at the 
New York Postgraduate Medical School. Dr. Ayres 
came into prominence some five years ago by advocat- 
ing the local treatment of certain cases of Bright 's 
disease by direct medication applied through a cathe- 
ter per urinary bladder and ureter to the pelvis of the 
kidney; some of this prominence was abusive, as first 
class new medical and surgical work must always 



expect ; the judgment of his associates was such as 
to elect him twice president of the New York Society 
of the American Urological Association. President 
M. A. C. Club of New York, 1907 ; member Grad- 
uates' Club of New York City, the New York County, 
State and American Medical Associations as well of 
many local societies. Married 1896, Lucie Leveque 
Prudhomme; one daughter. Address, 616 Madison 
Avenue, New York; country residence, Shippan 
Point, Conn. 

II. Henry Edcerton Chapin, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
D. Sc, was born at Wilbraham. in 1859; fitted for 
M. A. C. at the Springfield High School and the 
Springfield Collegiate Institute and entered with the 
class of '82 in January. 1879; was known as a quiet, 
persistent student attending to his own business; one 
of the founders of C. S. C. ; was graduated with the 
class of '81 ; taught in secondary schools and engaged 
in agricultural journalism for five years; studied chem- 
istry under Remsen and biology under Martin and 
Brooks in Johns Hopkins; again teaching in secon- 
dary schools and Pennsylvania State Normal School ; 
1891 appointed professor of biology in Ohio Univer- 
sity, building up a department from a very small 
beginning and in connection with which established a 
preparatory medical course— this latter earned one 
year's credit for the student in the University of 
Pennsylvania and Jefferson medical schools; while 
at Ohio University also engaged in original work in 
biology publishing his researches on "persistent mam- 
malian cardiac vitality ;" an organizer and charter 
member of the Ohio Academy of Science ; commis- 
sioned by President McKinley, captain Co. B. 17th 
regiment Ohio National Guards. Since 1 890 instruc- 
tor in biology and physiography in the high school 
system of New York City , president of the depart- 
ment of botany of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and 
Sciences which has several thousand members ; mem- 
ber of the Council of the same. Writer on biology; 
joint author Chapin's and Rettger's Elementary 
Zoology and Guide; special work in Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College in physiological chemistry and at 
the Cold Spring Harbor marine laboratory in biology. 
Fellow of Society of Biological Chemistry, London' 
Member American Society of Naturalists and Univer- 
sity Club of Brooklyn. Married in 1893, Eudora M. 
Hoffman of Athens, O ; one son and two daughters • 



the son deceased. Address 49 Lefferts Ave., 
Richmond Hill, New York City. 

III. John Bacon Minor. B. Sc, was born at 
Bridgeport, Conn., in 1853 ; fitted for college at New 
Britain High School; Q. T. V. ; Phi Kappa Phi ; 
graduated with class of 73; post-graduate work one 
year with Dr. Goessmann ; book-beeper, order clerk, 
export clerk. 1874-85; since member of the firms 
Minor. Nichols & Co. and Minor & Corbin Mfg, Co. 
and actively connected with other going concerns ; 
national bank director ; member of local and country 
clubs, Graduates Club of New York City, New Brit- 
ain Scientific Association; vice-president Associate 
Alumoi M. A. C.. 1883; President M. A. C. Club 
of New York, 1905. Married 1877 at Worcester, 
Jennie L. Eldred. One daughter and three sons 
living; one grandchild; oldest son, in junior year at 
Columbia University preparing for the practice of law. 
Address, New Britain, Conn. Tne foregoing is the 
apparently uneventful record of a business man highly 
respected in his own community and beloved by all 
M. A. C. men that have the honor of knowing him. 

Dr. John A. Cutter. '82. 



D?p&rtm?nHr fJot?s. 



AGRICULTURE. 

James H. Ritchie has been selected as architect 
for the new barns and plans have already been begun. 

The prizes offered to the short course students by 
the Bowker Fertilizer Company and the German 
Kali Works were both awarded to Edward F. Bel- 
chers of South Framingham. 

HORTICULTURE. 

The finishing, furnishing and dedication of French 
Hall and the moving of the Floriculture and Market 
Gardening departments have kept the Division of Hor- 
ticulture pretty busy during the last two weeks. Pro- 
fessor White and Mr. Thompson are now fully settled 
in their new quarters and this leaves more room In 
the crowded regions of Wilder Hall. 

The annual exhibition of landscape photographs is 
now on view at Wilder Hall. It contains 83 pictures 
by several different artists, many of them of the most 
beautiful and artistic character. The show has been 
open to all the public, but it has been arranged espec- 






I 



146 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



>47 




ially for the beneft of the senior class in landscape 
gardening. These men have been working over the 
pictures trying to answer a long list of direct questions 
asked by Professor Waugh. 

Professor Waugh lectured before a farmers' insti- 
tute in Uxbridge the 9th and attended the annual 
meeting of the Massachusetts Fruit Growers in Wor- 
cester on the 10th. Professor Sears attended the 
same meeting on the 1 1th. 

The Commission on Grounds, composed of a few 
trustees and members of the faculty, has been mak- 
ing an extended study of the college grounds with a 
view to their further development. Warren H. Man- 
ning of Boston has been drawing the plans, which will 
soon be ready for public inspection. It is the inten- 
tion to arrange for a public exhibition of the designs at 
the College sometime before commencement at which 
time a day or more will be devoted to a general expla- 
nation and discussion of the proposed improvements. 
Mr. Gracey has been very busy of late drafting 
plans for fruit storage houses, athletic fields and 
other projects coming before the legislature. 

The Woman's Home Companion for April has an 

illustrated article by Professor Waugh entitled "The 

Foundation of Good Gardening." 

LIBRARY. 

Work has been started to properly arrange and care 

for the accumulation of college memorabilia. A large 

number of newspaper clippings have been sorted and 

arranged and will now be pasted Into scrap book form ; 

announcements, programs, photographs, etc., will be 

properly labeled and arranged, and a system of caring 

for the writings of M. A. C. men and items of special 

importance will be inaugurated. Miss Turner, '08, 

has been engaged to assist in this work. 

A set of Brockhaws' ••Conservation-Lexicon," 1883- 
87, has been added to the reading room equipment. 
Ninety-two volumes of "Everyman's Library" have 
also been added. 

Professor and Mrs. Fernald have recently given to 
the library several volumes of Aggie Life and Col- 
lege Signal. Mrs. F. A. Waugh, Mrs. George 
Henry of Pleasant St. and Mrs. H. M. Warner of 
Sunderland have given a large number of very desir- 
able magazines and also some agricultural reports. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 



•'That Pill Grimm" Tech Show 1909, which will 
be presented here on the nineteenth of April, is being 
rapidly put into shape under the able direction of 
Coach Francis, who was so successful with last 
year's show "Over the Garden Wall." The princi- 
pals and chorus have been rehearsing their parts for 
over a month, and the six Spanish dancers will intro- 
duce some clever figures and fancy dances which are 
worthy of professionals. 

Last year the Tech Show was quite markedly dif- 
ferent from the general college production, both in 
the olot and in the presentation of the characters 
themselves. There was an absence of the general 
run of college songs and scenes and the play was 
more on the lines of the regular musical comedy. 
This was tried as an experiment, as it presents more 
difficulties to the amateur than the regular college 
theatricals. It proved such a success, however, that 
this year the competition for the book was open only 
to true musical comedies, and the result has been a 
play that might well be produced by a professional 
company. The plot is concerned with the landing of 
the Pilgrims, and with their subsequent adventures 
in Plymouth town. 

The Tech Show as an organization is managed 
entirely by students with the one exception of the 
coach. The book, music, lyrics and the poster are 
all student products, and of course the cast and 
chorus is made up entirely of undergraduates. The 
management this year is as follows: G. A. Joslin, 
1909, general manager; R. F. Goodwin, 1910, stage 
manager; C. J. Sittinger, 1910, business manager; 
D, Clapp, 1910. advertising manager, and seven 
assistants. 



Alumni. 



Among recent visitors to the college, many of 
whom attended the Farmers' Institute, March 10-12, 
have been:— H. L. Cowles, 71 ; J. W. Clark, 72; 
A. H. Montague 74; G. P. Smith, '79; W. A. 
Parsons, '88; J.R.Blair, '89; H. M. Thomson, 
'92; H. B. Read, "95; A. S. Kinney, '96; C. G. 
Clark, '98; G. C. Hubbard, '99; R. W. Morse, 
'02; A W. Higgins, '07; F. A. Watklns, '07; 
Miss Bartholomew, C. Dolan, J. R. Parker, '08. 

The recent meeting of the Massachusetts Fruit 
Growers' Association held in Worcester was some- 
thing of an M. A. C. affair. The list of officers 
shows J. W. Clark, '72, North Hadley, president; 
S. T. Maynard, '72, Northboro. vice-president; 



Charles A. Whitney, '89, of Upton, secretary and 
treasurer; J. L. Ellsworth, Worcester, auditor. 
The last named is a member of our board of trustees. 
Out of six names on the program, two were gradu- 
ates, viz : Dr. E. Porter Felt, '91, of Albany, N. Y., 
and H. L. Frost, '85, of Arlington. 

'86.— Prof. G. E. Stone attended a fraternity 
banquet on the 13th in New York city, where he met 
a number of our alumni. 

'95.— Orange Judd Co. of New York has issued a 
new book, "The Business of Dairying." by Clarence 
B. Lane, Assistant Chief, Dairy Division, U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture. 

'00.— James W. Kellogg has been appointed chief 
chemist, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, 
Division Agricultural Chemistry, succeeding Mr. Ful- 
ler, who has accepted a position at Washington. 
Mr. Kellogg attended President Taft's inauguration. 

'02. — J. M. Dellea has been appointed manager 
of a firm in Great Barrington, Mass. 

'03.— S. C. Bacon was a guest of the engineers 
of the Hudson and Manhattan R. R. Co. at their 
dinner in New York on March 13. 



'04— '08.— Maurice A. Blake, the station horti- 
culturist, is author of Bulletin No. 219, "First 
Season with the Peach," issued last month by the 
New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Stations. A. 
J. Farley. '08, is his assistant. 

Ex-'05.— In the Lowell Courier- Citizen for March 
II appeared an article on Justus C. Richardson's 
Beaver Brook Farm in Dracut. Fifty acres are under 
cultivation for market produce and fruit. The rais- 
ing of crops under glass, especially lettuce and 
cucumbers, constitutes an Important part of his work. 

'06. — Richard Wellington's name appears as 
assistant author on the title-page of "The Grapes of 
New York," one of the most beautiful and sumptuous 
volumes on pomology ever printed in America. 

'08.— A letter from Frank F. Hutchings, science 
Instructor at the South Manchester, Conn. High 
School says that the courses under his charge, espec- 
ially chemistry, are being greatly amplifed and 
extended. A large number of students have enrolled, 
a very gratifying thing to him. 

'08.— J. A. Anderson, City Horticulturalist, 39 
Orchard St., Newark, N. J. 



Be sure you see the new TECH SHOW 

THAT PILL GRIMM 

A Musical Comedy in two acts written and played by the students of the 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Tli© Best College Show Ever Given 

GET YOUR TICKETS EARLY 



Academy of Music, Northampton. 

MONDAY EVE., APRIL 19 



REMEMBER THE DATE 



r 



148 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 










GOODS FOR MEN 



' - 






C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



My Woolens Are Now on the Market 

A great selection of imported and domestic goods. 
A big line of flannel trousers from $5.50-$! 2.00, 
and they are genuine and up to date in style. 
Guaranteed for first class fit and workmanship. 

Pressing, cleaning, dyeing and altering neatly 
done. 

FULL DRESS SUITS TO RENT 

I. JV1. LABROVITZ 

Amherst, Mass. 
1 1 Amity Street, phone 54-4 

RabaFslmi, 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 



Ol.l South Street, off Main, 



SOUTHAMPTON, MASS 



CAMPION, 

AIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



INTER-COLLEGIATK BUREAU OK ACADEMIC COSTUME 

College Caps and Gowns. 

COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Brnntiful Grounds Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB. DAY. 

When in " H»mp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 



Mersi House Baft 



Four First Class Barbers 




Open Mondays from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



Tuesdays 


7 ' 


6 


H 


Wednesdays, 


7 ' 


8 


M 


Thursdays, 


7 ' 


6 


11 


Fridays, 


7 " 


8 


« 


Saturdays, 


7 " 


11 


«( 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Kxcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 9b% Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE UORTIjlB GOUlPflHY. 



a4-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



_ 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

Minufacturro and Dtalm in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It is generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRKirlT & On SON 
have the best looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The WWIOHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the fine.it. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIGHT dto Ol*r«02V 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

18 WEST ;,oth ST.. NEW VORK 
Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 





" For the 



Land's Sake 

USE 

BOWKER'S 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 




SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

Telephone connections direct to our 
UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

K. A. THOMPSON, 

rst National Bank. A wT. 



Rear First Na 




AMHKRST 



Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, *07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avp , Nkw York. 







II 















THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CouDBCticut valley street Railway Go. 

AMHKRHT DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Ainheratand Northampton on the hour ana 
half hour from 6 30 a.m. till 10.80 F. M. Sundays the first car 
will leave at 8.80 a.m. 

Maim office, Qbeknfibld, Mass. 

John A. Taffgart, Supt. 

Northampton office, 102 Maim St. 

C. W. Clapp, Aaat. 8upt. Telephone, Northampt on, 126-12 . 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To itfb your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Ofpositb Towm Hall. 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1808. 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 

Care leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Care at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.13 p. m., 
express, and 5.38 p. m. The 5.88 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 
6.20 p. M. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DE^UE^'S X>RUO »TORE> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic lllock, near Depot, Open every day. 
Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted for Its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYIVTOIV, 

MANUFACTURES OF 

SODA WATERS, 

1'ineapple, Lemon and German Tonic. Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



C S. GATES, 13.13. 

DENTAL SOOMS, 



I ITI.EB'8 BLOCK AMII 



KR8T, MASS 



KIVEK STREET, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

HE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. U. B. 
DENTAL BOOMS. 

WILLIAM* BLOCK, amhkrst, mash. 

Office Hours: 

S TO 13 A.. M., l-ao TO 6 J»_ M. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Oas admlnl«tered when desired 



OUR ICE GREA]W SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



TRY OUR 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BE8T SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICE8. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



JVI. A..C. A-jc't , 



banana splits 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



M. A. C. '82, 



C R.WBBB, •<>» 



Qet Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered ThurHday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

!^e3ATISFAOTION CIUAIIANTBED.I^ 
H. A. UTLMT, Mmnmfr. 

Omcm : 
East Pleasant Street. 



FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Your Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATCH MAKER 

ii Amity St., Amhkkst, Mass. 

Mainsprings, i year .. ^ 

Uean.n K , » f ^ 

Prompt reliable work at Lowest Prices. 



The Children are Happy. 



Becaunc vneir clothe* are made on the New Homf 8ewh»« 
Ma. hire, which fact, shhuh-h them of no "rln.. •• wf.thi^ 
f^!2 J re V£. e . Bt °w. ce M "u win "° for the,r children In yea™ 



to come. Dealers Everywhere 



rs 
years 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 
















CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No businesslike fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some Mowers. Better than candy for results. 



OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



Telephone. 



Arthur E. Dorr. L- B. Tourtklottk: 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AND JOBBEH8 IM 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 



102 Main St., 



Corner North and Union St*., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, ' - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STARLES 

CHASES' BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE, 



Telephone Connection, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Uniform* 
for all 
Athletic 
Sport* 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



Official 
Implement* 
for all 
Track and 
Field Sports 

Spalding'* handsomely Illustrated catalogue of 

all *port* contain* numerous suggestions 

Mailed free anywhere 

A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. 

73 Federal St., - - Boston. 



J. H.TROTT 

PLDPEB, STEBiD & MS FITTER. 

AKD DE0LE1 IK STOVES SID BUSES. 



Shop 15 i-a North Plhasant St. 



Telephone 36.U. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ESTABLISH hl> k-,| 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMI'LKTK LINK OK UOODS 
8UITKD TO THK STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 



EIMER & AMEND, 

106-211 Third Av«., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPOKTKKM AMI MAM I u rem lot ni 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
(hem leal and Scientific Apparatus, 

-A.SSAY QOODS. 

Wo handle the hot of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LAHOKATORT. 



10 Phoenix Row, 



Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



LEW 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, 83.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Hath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 

5P£CIAL ATTENTION' GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

GERARD. N. LEW. 

•9 PLEASANT ST. REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

BOLTOKB, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FIH1 CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

(HBO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



A FULL LINK OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 






ArtHftST , flA$$, 



■.'-,:• ;- f , 













HE 



flfoaseacbusetts 
Hgricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2 ^ POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of «c ; ence. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



IV 



Affrlc Llltl ti LXi 

Collect 



THE COLIE&E SffiHTAI 



VOL. 19 



NO. 13 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 









AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 14, 1909 







■■:' 



f 






it 







We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



Page's SDoe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




E. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VlOhlH, BRHJO, IBRlBDOlilH, GUITAR STRINGS. 

0CCULI8T8 PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 
best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 
branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 
THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 
190 Pearl St., - - Hartford, Conn. 



HU RBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLA6E HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 



1909 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collbob Siomal, Amherst. Mass. Thb Sional will be 
tent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



BOASD OF EDITORS 

WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. Editor-in-Chief. 
E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager. 
EDCAR M. BROWN, 1911, Assistant Business Manager. 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. College Notes. LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910. Athletic Notes. 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, Alumni Notes. PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1, Department Notes. 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. College Notes. HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911. Special. 

ALDEN C BRETT, 1912. Circulation Department. 
ALBERT W. DODCE, 1912. Circulation Department. 



Terms, $1.00 per nea r in sdcanca. Single Copies, 10c. PoeUge outside ol United States and Canada, Sfc. extra. 



The Union. 

Ath'etic Board. 

Foot- Ball Association. 

Basket-Bail Association, 

Base- Ball Association, 

Track Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate, 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 
R. H. Allen. Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 
R. S. Eddy, Manager. 
Hockey Association. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Indei. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 
Tennis Association, 
L. C. Schermerhorn, Manager. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad, Pres. 
H. W. Blaney. Manager. 
F. T. Haynes. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 
F. L. Thomas, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 
•BSSMrail * utiwu, Manas*. 



Edi-tbrials. 



Informal April 17. 



Owing to Illness, Walter R. Clarke will not return 
to college until next September. H. A. Brooks has 
been elected acting editor-in-chief for the remainder 
of the college year. 



According to the constitution of the College 
Sicnal. competition for the board opened on April 1 . 
This competition is opened to members of the classes 
of 1911 and 1912. All matter pertaining to this 
work canbe found on the bulletin board. Show some 
interest, men, in your college publication and work for 
a position on its board of editors. Hand in your 
names to the office and get assignments. Start now. 
and keep at it. 

The following ia taken from the Signal constitution 
and by-laws : 



Article II. 

Section 2. Applicants may become candidates by 
registering their names at the Signal office. Candi- 
dates may compete In either the news or business 
departments, or in both, according to a predetermined 
scale of credits, * * * 

Sec. 3. Competition shall be open between April 
1 and March 1 . 

Sec. 4. On March 1 , that candidate from the 
Junior class who shall have obtained the greatest 
number of credits shall become a member of the 
Board ; the two candidates each from the Sophomore 
and Freshman classes who shall have obtained the 
greatest number of credits shall become members of 
the Board. 

By-law 4. Reports of candidates shall be sub- 
mitted to the English department of the college and 
shall receive a grade. Papers below passing shall be 
rejected. Grades above passing shall be averaged 
with the (space) credit awarded. 








. 



15° 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•5« 






Scale of Credits. 

One credit shall be given for : 

Each five hours' work to be given at the direction 
of the editor-in-chief. 

Each ten inches of original copy. This shall com- 
prise athletic games and college notes. 

For each fifteen inches of reprint or other material 
such as speeches, department notes, and alumni notes 
or material gotten by interview. 

New ads. to the value of ten dollars ($10) at the 
regular rates. 



/Uhletic No-Us- 



BASEBALL. 



M. A. C, 7; R. I. C, 3. 
Our baseball team has started its season with even 
greater speed than was expected. Eleven hits, two 
of them doubles and two triples, is fast work. The 
fielding was also very good, only three errors, one of 
them excusable, being made. The pitching of Wil- 
liams was speedy and accurate. He allowed seven 
hits for a total of eight, and struck out three. In the 
second inning he fanned two men on six pitched balls. 
The work of Warner on the bases was daring, and 
Bean stole second twice. The latter also contributed 
two nice catches of high flies back of third, and Smith 
at second made the star play of the game with a one 
handed stab of a high fly in the fourth. For Rhode 
Island. E. F. Smith and Tully did the hitting, with 
two and three, respectively. The fielding of the 
visitors was weak, seven errors being made, mostly 
by the three basemen. In detail the game was as 
follows : E. F. Smith started with a hit to right on 
the first ball pitched, stole second, but was left. 
O'Grady reached first on a fumble by Doll, was 
sacrificed to second by Thayer. Hubbard hit to 
right, and 0' Grady was caught at the plate on the 
throw-in. Williams sent an easy roller through 
Butterworth. Doll made his second error on Smith's 
grounder, Hubbard scoring but Smith was caught off 

his base. 

Only nine batters in the next three innings for R. 
I. For M. A. C, Warner reached second when 



Knowles dropped his fly. French sacrificed him to 
third. Bean tried a sacrifice, but his bunt was fielded 
home in time to catch Warner. Bean stole, scored 
on Ackerman's drive over short. O'Grady's grounder 
was too hot for Doll. Tully recovered the ball and 
threw to the plate, getting Ackerman. 

Third inning : Thayer beat out an infield hit, but 
was forced by Hubbard. Next two men out, Smith 
to Butterworth. 

Fourth inning : with two down Bean drew the first 
pass of the game, stole, and was left. 

Fifth : Tully doubled with two men gone, and 
scored when Ackerman threw Moyer's grounder wild 
to first. Goodale fanned. Thayer tripled to the drill 
hall after O' Grady had popped up an easy one to 
pitcher Warner. Doll hit the ball, and caught 
Thayer off third. Hubbard popped out to Moyer. 
Sixth: E. F. Smith lined to Ackerman. Bean 
foozled Sullivan's bounder, Sullivan stole, Butter- 
worth flew out to center, Doll hit to right, scoring 
Sullivan. Doll stole, but could not advance. 

With a tie score, Williams lined a hot one to 
center, Smith tried to sacrifice him to second, but 
Warner's throw to second was dropped by E. F. 
Smith. Both men safe, F. C. Warner was passed, 
French fanned, Bean's roller was fielded wild to the 
plate by Butterworth, Williams tallying. Ackerman 
drove a short one to left, Smith coming home. 
O'Grady grounded to third, who threw home, nailing 
Warner. Thayer out to left. Score, 4-2. 

Seventh: with one out, Tully hit to left, stole, 
went to the third bag on a passed ball, scored on 
Ackerman's fumble of Moyer's hard grounder. 
Moyer died stealing, and Goodale went out, second 
to first. One out. Williams hit past short. H. E. 
Smith hit to E. F. Smith, who touched Williams 
out, and threw out H. E. Smith at first. 

Eighth: E. F. Smith hit over second base, but 
was forced when O'Grady threw Sullivan's drive to 
Ackerman. Next two were easy outs. F. G. 
Warner hit to right, and fast foot-work on his part 
made it good for three bags. French's grounder let 
him in. Bean reached the first station on an error, 
and Ackerman's drive into the pines in left advanced 
both two bases, according to ground rules. 
O'Grady's double in the same place scored two 



more. Thayer's fly to right was fielded to second, 
catching O'Grady. 

In the ninth, pitcher Warner hit to left. Knowles 
forced him. Tully hit to left, Thayer threw Knowles 
out on a relay, Williams to French. Moyer died 
easily, second to first. 

The score : 



M. A. I . 



A.B. 



O'Grady. c.f., 
Thayer. I.f . 
Hubbard, lb.. 
Williams, p.. 
H. E. Smith, 
F. C Warner, r.f 
French, c. 
Bean, 3b., 
Ackermann, s.a., 



2b 



5 
4 
4 
4 
3 
J 
3 
3 
4 






1 
I 
1 
I 


2 
I 



2 
2 
1 

2 

1 



3 








I 



1 






P.O. 

1 



1 1 
I 

3 


6 

2 
3 



33 



R. I. c. 



A.B. 



II 



2 27 II 



S.H. P.O. 



E. F. Smith, 2b., 


4 





2 





3 


4 


2 


Sullivan, s.s., 


4 


1 








2 








Butterworth, lb.. 


4 











8 





? 


Doll. 3b.. 


4 





1 





2 


2 


2 


Warner, p.. 


4 





I 





2 


3 





Knowles, r.f., 


4 











1 


7 


1 


Tully. I.f., 


4 


2 


3 





1 


1 





Moyer, c. 


4 











4 


3 





Goodale, c.f.. 


3 











1 









35 



24 15 



Score— M. A. C 7. R. I. C. 3. Two base hits— O'Grady, Ackerman. 
Tully. Three base hits— F. C. Warner. Thayer. Struck out— by Williams 
4, by Warner I. Stolen bases— Bean 2. E. F. Smith. Sullivan. Doll, 
Tulley. Double play— E. F. Smith to Butterworth, Knowles to E. F 
Smith. Pasaed ball— French, Time— 1-45. Umpire— Foley. 



BASKETBALL. 

Freshmen, 18; Sophomores, 9. 

The freshman basketball team defeated the sopho- 
more team by a score that does not do justice to the 
game. The final count -up shows that the freshmen 
had just twice the number of points their ooponents 
had. This would seem to indicate that the victors 
had an easy time winning the game. As a matter of 
fact, the score was within two points of being a tie 
during the greater part of the game. Toward the 
end of it, however, Pearson gave his man the slip, 
and made three baskets, winning the game for the 
freshmen. The guarding on both sides was extremely 
close, making shots at the basket very rare, and 
inaccurate. Fouls were not especially numerous, 
considering the strenuous nature of the game. 
Smith, '11, threw three of his seven chances, and 
Covill four out of six. 



Morse lead the way to the basket after a minute of 
play. Covill came back with three points soon after, 
then Moreau brought it to five, Smith, '11. shot a 
foul, making the score 5-3. Pearson got one basket 
in this half, and Morse let the ball fall through the ring 
just as the whistle blew. Score 7-5 In favor of 1912. 

Barrows drew first blood for 1911 In the second 
half. Tie score, 7 7. Then the freshmen began to 
draw away from 1911, Pearson's three baskets, 
Gray's one, and Covill's three fouls making Smith's 
two fouls of no real value. 

Pearson, the freshman left forward, was the star of 
the game. His three baskets in the second half were 
superb. The highly, satisfactory way Regan, '08, 
refereed such a turbulent class affair is worthy of 
note. 

The line-up: 

1912. 

McGarr, Smith. 1. 1 b. 
Moreau, Carpenter, r. 1 b. 
Covill, c. 
Muller. Cray, I. f. 
Pearson, Brett, r. f. 
Score— 1912. 18; 1911.9. 



1911. 
r. f.. Morse. Larrabee 
i. U, Smith 
c, Barrows. Bursley 
r. b.. Johnson. Armstrong 
I. b.. Nickerson. Stevenson. 
Baskets— Pearson 4. Morse 2. 
Barrows. Moreau. Covill. Gray. Fouls thrown— Smith. 'II. 
3. Covill 4. Referee — Regan. '18. Timekeeper — Johnson. 
'08. Two 15-minute periods. 



Colleg? JMo*?S- 



R. D. Lull. Ex '09, visited College this week. 

Dean Mills addressed the Y. M. C. A. Thursday 
evening, April 8. 

L. K. Liang '08, visited college lately. He is 
taking graduate work in soils at Cornell. 

The college quartet sang at two no-license rallies at 
West Springfield on March 27 and April 4. 

L. G. Schermerhorn ' 10 is substituting as instructor 
in agriculture at the Mt. Hermon School at Northfield. 

A young doe was seen crossing the campus on 
Wednesday, April 7. This is rather an unusual 
sight. 

On Tuesday evening, April 13, A. T. 
the American Coal Products Co. of 
addressed the Stockbridge Club on the 
of Ammonium Sulphate." 



Atwater of 

New York, 

' ' Production 




*5* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i Si 



F. T. Haynes attended the President's conference 
of the Y. M. C. A. at Harvard College, April 9, 10, 
and 11. 

Prof. C. H. Fernald, Dean of the Graduate School, 
spoke at the assembly, April 7, on "A Trip to Eu- 
rope." He spoke very interestingly of his personal 
experiences while on such a trip in 1878. 

At a meeting of the Stockbridge Club, April 6, the 
following officers for the year were elected : Presi- 
dent, H. W. French MO; Vice-President, F. T. 
Haynes *10; Secretary and Treasurer, J. C. Bailey; 
Executive Committee, H. W. French, Prof. F. A. 
Waugh, Prof. J. A. Foord, A. W. Holland '10, and 
W. H. Hill Ml. 



The speaker at Vespers Sunday, March 21 was 
President William C. Huntington of Boston Univer- 
sity. President Huntington gave an interesting and 
effective address, using as his text the words "Be- 
hold 1 have set before you an open door." Educa- 
tion, religion and the proper use of money were given 
as the three open doors of every man into a fuller and 
nobler life. 



The Senior Class has elected the following class- 
day speakers: Ivy poet, Myron E. Greer of Spring- 
field; class odist, George M. Brown of Cambridge; 
class song, Waldo D. Barlow of Amherst; campus 
orator, Lamert S. Corbett of Jamaica Plain; class 
orator, Charles H. White of Providence, R. !. j pipe 
orator, Paul E. Alger of Somerville ; hatchet orator, 
Oscar C. Bartlett of Westhampton. 

At a meeting of the Athletic Board it was voted 
to award an H. M. T. to those members of the 
hockey team playing in five intercollegiate games in 
one season. Accordingly, by this ruling, the follow- 
men are the first men entitled to wear an H. M. T. 
at M. A. C. :— Manager R. C. Potter, "09, Captain 
Louis Brandt, MO, Elmer E. Hathaway, '09, Peck- 
ham, 12. Norris, M2, and Sanctuary, '12. 

The results of the Intercollegiate Championship 
Gallery Match, in which a team representing this 
college shot on the twenty fourth of March have been 
announced by the National Rifle Association and are 
as follows : 



The Flint Prize speakers have been chosen as 
follows :— Roger S. Eddy of Dorchester, Myron S. 
Hazen of Springfield, William C. Johnson of South 
Framingham, William E. Leonard of Belmont, 
Willard M. S. Titus of New Braintree, Arthur W, 
Holland of Shrewsbury: Alternates; Lawrence 
S. Dickinson of Amherst, Charles A. Oertel of 
South Hadley Falls. 



The high wind of Thursday, April 8, did consider- 
able damage around college. The cement wall which 
formed the south side of the barn and was left standing 
after the fire of last August, blew down, carrying with 
it the north end of the cow-barn. In addition to the 
damage done to the barn, which was considerable, 
two cows were injured and one of the farm help was 
cut on the head by a piece of falling slate. 

The chimney on the west side of the tower on 
South College blew down about ten o'clock on the 
same day. Owing to the fact that all the men were 
at recitation, no one was injured as there otherwise 
might have been. Several windows were blown from 
the plant house connected with Clark Hall. 



Name of team. 
State College of Washington, 
Columbia University, 
University of Wisconsin. 
George Washington University. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
University of California. 
State University of Iowa. 
University of Maine, 
Agricultural College of Utah. 
University of Pennsylvania. 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Cornell University, 

University of Nevada. 

Michigan Agricultural College. 

Louisiana State University. 

Delaware College, 

Rhode Island College. 

The highest individual score was made by A. A. 

Leach, Jr., Columbia University; standing 49, prone 

49, total 98. 

Winning team shot with government 22 Cal. rifle. 



Score. 




Standing. 


Prone, 


Total. 


459 


470 


929 


452 


471 


923 


437 


481 


918 


430 


488 


918 


448 


466 


914 


432 


476 


908 


427 


474 


901 


435 


462 


897 


427 


467 


896 


426 


463 


889 


429 


443 


870 


417 


450 


867 


430 


431 


861 


410 


436 


846 


388 


437 


825 


402 


416 


818 


385 


431 


816 



'91, j, b. Hull was defeated by four votes in the 

contest for selectmen at Great Barrington. There 
were six candidates and the contest was the most 
interesting the town has had in twenty years. 



April 15. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m., in Chapel. 



16. 



Debating Club, 7-45 p. m., in Chapel. 

—Teachers' Conference in Chapel. 
Baseball Game, Tuft's College, on Cam- 
pus. 

17. — Mass Meeting, 9-00 a. m., in Chapel. 
Teachers' Conference, in Chapel. 
Baseball Game, W. P. I., on Campus. 
Informal, 4-00 p. m., in Drill Hall. 

18. — Vespers, 5-00 p. m., in chapel. 

19.— Patriot's Day: Tech Show at North- 
ampton. 

20.— Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p. m. , in Agri- 
culture Room. 
21. — Assembly, 1-15 p. m., in Chapel. 
22.— Y. M. C. A.. 6-45 p. m., in Chapel. 

Debating Club, 7-45 p. m., In Chapel. 
25, — Vespers, 5-00 p. m., in Chapel. 

27.— Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p.m., in Agri- 
culture Room. 

28. — Assembly, 1-15 p. m., In Chapel. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '87 
14, Scientific Work. 

The Act of Congress granting land for the endow- 
ment of colleges required that an annual report should 
be made regarding the progress of each college, 
recording any improvements and experiments made, 
with their cost and results, and such other matters 
including state industrial and economical statistics, as 
might be supposed useful. 

The first recorded scientific work at the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural college appears to have been regis- 
ters of meteorological observations in 1867 and suc- 
ceeding years, taken by Prof. E. S. Snell, professor 
of mathematics, and Miss Sabra C. Snell. The 
registers for 1867 and 1868 were particularly com- 
plete and occupied over 50 pages in the fifth and sixth 
annual reports of the trustees. 



Prof. C. A. Goessmann, being intensely Interested 
in the cultivation of the sugar-beet and the production 
of beet sugar as an agricultural enterprise In Massa- 
chusetts, conceived and carried on a notable series of 
experiments during the years 1870-73, which were 
quite fully detailed in the annual reports of the 
trustees. In 1870 he sent to Germany and procured 
seeds of the thirteen best sorts of sugar beets culti- 
vated in Saxony and Prussia. These were sown on 
the ground which happened to be In the best condi- 
tion for them and a fair crop was obtained, notwith- 
standing the unpropitious season. The juice of these 
different kinds of beet was expressed by means of a 
portable cider-mill, and subjected to careful examina- 
tion to determine the per cent of sugar. The results 
were quite variable, but very satisfactory. In 1871, 
five acres of beets were cultivated on the college 
farm, and seed distributed to various localities in the 
stated with a view of testing the adaptation of the crop 
to our soil and climate. The results were exceed- 
ingly gratifying. In 1872 the most important experi- 
ment was the growing of seed from carefully selected 
beets of the best sorts, which were to be tested the 
following year. The most approved labor-saving 
machinery for sowing, cultivating and harvesting the 
best crop was imported from Germany for the purpose 
of demonstrating the lowest cost of raising beets In 
Massachusetts. Professor Goessmann's conclusion 
appears to have been that the real success of the 
beet-sugar industry in its, at that time, high state of 
development, depended with us far more on an Intelli- 
gent and close attention to the details of Its various 
operations in the field and in the factory than on any 
other requirement. 

The want of sufficient data for a satisfactory deter- 
mination of the manner in which plants absorb and 
distribute through their various parts the nutrient 
materials by the assimilation of which they grow, led 
to an extensive series of investigations in the spring 
of 1873 upon the circulation of sap in the sugar-maple 
and some 60 other species of trees and shrubs. Pro- 
fessor Peabody had the task of making, adjusting and 
repairing six mercurial gauges, used In determining 
the pressure exerted by the sap of different trees, and 
of recording most of the observations. It Is said that 
he visited tne guages under his charge several times 
daily for many weeks, one of them being reached by 









j 

I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'55 






a perpendicular ladder 42 feet in height. Professor 
Stockbridge recorded the fluctuations of the mercury 
in the guage upon the sugar-maple during a period of 
90 days Professor Goessmann took the specific 
gravity of a large number of specimens of sap from 
many species of trees, and from the same trees at 



house. Here, under the fostering care of Pro- 
fessor Maynard, the seeds germinated, the vine grew 
vigorously, and the squash lifted in a most satisfactory 
manner and was the wonder of the neighborhood and 
beyond. The weight of iron lifted by it in the course 
of its devopment ranged from 60 pounds on August 



many species of trees, and from tne sam e we « ^ r ^ ^ 

different times, and applied chemica It s for the 21st,o^ j ^ ^ ^ 



determination "of sugar and other ingredients. Mr 
Albert T Wakefield of the senior class assisted 
greatly in these investigations, a summary of which 
was prepared by President Clark and published in the 
eleventh annual report of the trustees (January, 

1874). 

President Clark delivered alecture upon "Observa- 
tions upon the Phenomena of Plant-Life" on the 
occasion of the meeting of the State Board of Agn- 
culture in Westfield, in December, 1874, In which 
he referred to the observations concerning "The Cir- 
culation of Sap in Plants", and called attention to 
five lines of enquiry to which special attention had 
been directed during the year. Briefly stated, these 
had to do with the structure, composition and arrange- 
ment of the winter-buds of hardy trees and shrubs; 
the percentage of water to be found in the branches 
and roots of trees; the phenomena and causes of the 
flow of sap from wounds in trees ; the structure and 
functions of the bark of exogenous trees ; and the 
expansive force of growing vegetable tissue. He 
stated that the investigations were instituted by him- 
self- but in carrying them out, he had enjoyed the 
valuable, and, in many cases, indispensable, ass.st- 
ance of gentlemen connected with the Agricultural 
college, either as officers or students. He mentioned 
the names of Professors Stockbridge, Maynard and 
Peabody, and Messrs. D. P. Penhallow. Charles 
Wellington, Walter H. Knapp, Atherton Clark, Wil- 
liam P. Brooks, Henry Hague and George R. Dodge 
of the student body. 

In order to ascertain the expansive force of grow- 
ing vegetable tissue, the squash, growing on the 
ground with great rapidity and to an enormous size, 
seemed, on the whole, to be the best fruit for the 
experiment. Accordingly seeds of the mammoth 
yellow Ghili squash were obtained from J. J. H. 
Gregory, of Marblehead, and were planted on the first 
of July in one of the propagating pits of the Durfee 



Another interesting series of experiments was that 
of feeding crops with special fertilizers in a purely 
chemical form. Such experiments were begun by 
Professor Stockbridge in 1867 and were continued 
for a series of years, both with fertilizers bought in 
the market and those which were sent to the the col- 
lege for the purpose by manufacturers. Professor 
Stockbridge said in the thirteenth annual report of the 
trustees (January 1876) that the success of the early 
experiments, which led to the final result, was largely 
due to the assistance and co-operation of Professor 
Goessmann. in testing the materials obtained, giving 
his opinion of the form in which they should be used, 
and in ascertaining the composition of the varieties of 
plants to be experimented with. He further said that 
the chemical compounds used in these experiments 
were not in common use, and were but little known in 
agricultural communities, and that as a necessary 
measure to prevent imposition In the manufacture 
and sale of these fertilizers, and to secure to the 
farmer the materials in suitable form and purity and 
correctly compounded according to the principles 
given, he had applied for and received a Unitsd States 
patent, covering the right to manufacture and sell 
fertilizers according to these formulas. This, then, 
was the origin of the well-known "Stockbridge 
Manures. " M uch credit is due Professors Goessmann 
and Stockbridge for the rational development and con- 
trol of the fertilizer problem in this Commonwealth. 



SOME 



<< 



MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES" WHOM 
I KNOW. 

[To be Continmd.} 

IV. William Delano Russell, B. Sc. , was born 
at Sunderland in 1851; entered college with pioneer 
class; a founding member of D. G. K. ; treasurer of 
the Rowing Association that managed the famous 
Ingleside crew; intimately connected with a protrac- 
ted interview of '71 and '72 near the old Amherst 



House, the exciting cause of said interview being the 
carrying of a cane by a member of '72; it is al- 
leged that the cane finally went to 71 ; Phi Kappa 
Phi ; did post-graduate work with Dr. Goessmann for 
one year; then went with Montague Paper Co. ; its 
vice-president and manager since 1885; director of 
Crocker National Bank, 1886; on the formation of 
the International Paper Company, organized its audi- 
ting department, an hurculean task ; now a member of 
the firm of Bulkely, Dunton and Company, besides 
connection with manufacturing paper concerns. Mar- 
ried 1882 Miss Kate M. Shumway of Webster: one 
daughter, an alumna of Bryn Mawr. President M. 
A. C. Club of New York, 1902. Address 329 West 
Eighty-third street. New York. 

V. James Henry Webb, B. Sc, LL. B., was 
born in 1854 at Santa Fe, New Mexico; fitted for 
college at Winchester Institute (Ct.,) and Hudson 
River Institute (New York); entered college with 
class of 74; graduated with 73; D. G. K. ; Phi 
Kappa Phi; LL. B. Yale, 1877; in practice of law 
since said date and to-day is a leader of the Connec- 
ticut Bar. Member of the bar of the Supreme Court 
of the U. S. Instructor in Yale Law School In 
criminal law and procedure and lecturer on medical 
jurisprudence ; director of various manufacturing and 
insurance companies, general counsel for Connecti- 
cut of the Aetna Indemnity Co. ; democratic candi- 
date, 2d congressional district, 1898; delegate Con- 
necticut constitutional convention, 1902. Member 
Amer. Bar Association, Graduates Club (New Haven) 
Catholic Club, (New York). Delegate Universal 
Congress of Lawyers and Jurists, St. Louis, 1904: 
Contributor "Criminal Law and Practice" in Two 
Centuries of Growth of American Law and Practice, 
Yale bi centennial publication. Editor American 
edition of Young's Outlines of Criminal Law. Mar- 
ried 1880, Miss Helen M. Ives; ten children; oper- 
ates successfully large dairy farm. President Asso- 
ciate Alumni 1879-1883 and of M. A. C. Club of 
New York, 1895 and 1904. Made presentation 
speech 1897 in matter of Loving Cup from Alumni 
to President Goodell and also historical address at 
the famous "Kommers." Is always missed when not 
in attendance at New York alumni dinners. Ad- 
dress, 42 Church street, New Haven, Conn. 



VI. Joseph Franklin Barrett, B. Sc, was 
born In 1854 at Barre ; fitted for college at Barre 
High School and Leicester Academy ; entered with 
class of 76, graduating with second honors with 75; 
Phi Kappa Phi ; founding member of Phi Sigma 
Kappa; index editor ; class toast-master; 1st lieut. 
Co. D. ; gratuity Grinnell agricultural prize. In the 
fertilizer business since 1877; to-day president or 
secretary of several corporations ; according to Dr. 
Paige, ('82) he and Mr. Bowker are ranked with the 
best educators of farmers; president Associate 
Alumni, 1885 \ presided at the "Kommers" of 1897, 
the first reunion of alumni and students around the 
festive board and one of the most significant events 
in our Alma Mater's history as the address of Levi 
Stockbridge with the concomitants of able presiding 
and other able speaking brought vital but somewhat 
warring forces together for the good and ultimate 
glory of the institution. In Phi Sigma Kappa, Mr. 
Barrett has been a tower of strength during the years 
it was extending itself successfully into the strongest 
institutions in the country ; all honors possible have 
been given him ; he is affectionally known as the Big 
Chief ; is a close student of the problems affecting 
our own and other colleges and universities; any fra- 
ternity at M. A. C. to-day, that wants advice on broad 
questions can wisely go to him and get of his rich ex- 
perience, for in helping other organizations he is also 
benefiting his own child, his Alma Mater and the 
people at large. President of M. A. C. Club of New 
York, 1887. Married 1879 Miss Mary F. Hlllman 
who died in 1907 ; married secondly December 1908, 
Mrs. Alice M. Fenner. Address, 60 Trinity place, 
New York. 

Dr. John A. Cutter, '82. 



Dfp&rtmfivf ftlot?s. 



Prof. W. R. Hart of the Department of Agri- 
cultural Education has announced the program for a 
high school teachers' institute and educational con- 
ference, under the direction of the State Board of 
Education in conjunction with the Agricultural Col- 
lege and the Head Masters' Club of Western Massa- 
chuaetts. It will be held April 16 and 17 at Amherst. 



w 



156 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The opening session will be held at 9-45 o'clock, 
Friday, in the College Chapel, when President K. L. 
Butterfield will make an address. Section meetings 
will be held in the morning. The speakers will be 



$1000 a year at the beginning with good chances of 
promotion. We can easily place a considerable 
number of men in such positions if they were suita- 
bly prepared. The necessary requirements in most 



win De neia in me murmng. 1 nc s^«rcij «■•• ~~ «v r-i 

Alfred M. Hitchcock of Hartford, Charles S. Thomas cases would be about as follows :— 



of Newton, Arthur C. Boyden of Bridgewater. Miss. 
Mabel Hill of Lowell, Arthur J. Meredith of Salem, 
Carlos P. Ellis of Springfield, William B. Hunter of 
Fitchburg, Wallace E. Mason of Andover, Howard 
C. Kelley of Springfield, Wallace E. Richmond of 
Great Barrington, Frederick L. Burnham, agent | 
for the Board of Promotion of Manual Arts, and 
Henry C. Morrison of Concord, N. H. At the gen- 
eral conference addresses will be given by Ralph L. 
Boldwin of Hartford, Conn., Charles I. Rice of 
Worcester, Earl Barnes of Philadelphia, George H. 
Martin, Secretary of Education, Boston. 

Saturday there will be a conference of agricultural 
teaching, at which the speakers will be Arthur C. 
Monahan of Turners Falls, R. H. Verbeck of Peters- 
ham, Paul A. Davis, John R. Parker and F. F. 
Hutchings of Amherst, Philip Emerson of Lynn, 
0. M. Clark of New York city, F. B. Jenks of Am- 
herst, George L. Aldrich of Brookline. 



1. Natural aptitude. Every man ought to have 
some taste either for teaching or for careful scien- 
tific work. He should have also the qualities of per- 
sonal character which are absolutely necessary in 
order to hold positions of this sort. 

2. He should specialize in horticulture to a con- 
siderable extent during his undergraduate course. 

3. He ought to do as much practical work as 
possible outside of the regular classroom studies. 

4. He ought to take at least one year of post- 
graduate work either here or at some other institution. 

This is not a difficult program to put before our 
men. A good many men to be able to fill these 
requirements every year, and there is no question 
about placing them in such positions as I have 

indicated. 

F. A. Wauch. 



ARBORICULTURE PRIZE. 
The J. D. W. French prize in arboriculture will be 
awarded at Commencement to that student, in any of 
the four college classes, who presents the best essay 
on "The Development of a Forest Nursery." All 
essays must be in the hands of Prof. E. A. White 
before June 1. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN HORTICULTURE. 

During the last six months there have been at least 
35 applications sent in to the Division of Horticulture 
for men in various lines of college and experiment 
station work. Some of these are wanted in lines of gen- 
eral horticulture, some in pomology, some in floricul- 
ture, some In market gardening, and some in landscape, 
gardening. In fact, every one of these lines has 
been asked for several times. There is a large and 
stable demand for men in these fields, and this de- 
mand seems to be increasing. 

While I have never strongly recommended this 
field of work to our students, I think it well worth 
considering. The positions usually pay from $600 to 



The fertilizer division of the plant and animal 
department of the Experiment Station has three men 
on the road collecting commercial fertilizers for the 
inspection of 1909. 

The field work of the Division of Horticulture is 
opening up earlier than usual this spring, and already 
begins to keep men busy. The annual spraying of 
lime- sulphur on the orchards has been given and 
plowing and planting are already under way. One of 
the most important plantings this spring will be a new 
dwarf fruit garden which will probably be located 
between Wilder Hall and the Stockbridge house. 

Professor Waugh spent his vacation in Washington. 
D. C, devoting the time chiefly to the study of land- 
scape gardening. 

The class In landscape gardening is taKing up the 
study of another set photographs. In this case the 
photographs are all of actual examples of landscape 
gardening. Thus while they have less purely artistic 
merit, they have more direct applications to the 
technical business in hand. As usual the study is 
directed by an extended syllabus of questions. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'57 



Professors Sears, White and Waugh, and Mr. 
Tompson have all arranged to give courses of lectures 
this spring at Smith Agricultural School at North- 
ampton. It appears that this interchange will be of 
mutual advantage to both institutions. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas. It nath pleased God in his infinite wisdom to take 
unto Himself the mother of our beloved friend and brother. 
Benjamin F. Barnes. Jr.. be it. 

Resolved, That we. the members of Theta Phi. do extend to 
him and to his family our heartfelt sympathy in this their 
hour of sorrow ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, that a copy be filed in the records of the 
fraternity, and that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

Charles S. Putnam, ) 

Fred P. Nickless, > For the Fraternity. 

Allyn P. Bursley. ) 

Whereas, it hath pleased God in his infinite wisdom to take 
unto Himself the mother of our beloved classmate. Benjamin 
F. Barnes, be it 

Resolved. That we. the members of the class of Nineteen 
Hundred and Nine do extend to him and his family our 
heartfelt sympathy in this their hour of sorrow : and be it 
further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to our 

bereaved classmate, that a copy be filed in the records of the 

class and that a copy be published in the College Signal. 

Arthur W. Hubbard, 
Wayne E. Geer, 
Warren L. Ide. 



Irvttrcollfgi&'te. 



THE "TECH" SHOW. 

"That Pill Grimm," The new musical comedy 
which the students of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology are now working on is the center of in- 
terest at the Institute. Three performances at the 
largest first-class theater :n Boston are not enough to 
satisfy the demand there, and it has been necessary to 
give another performance in Maiden. A large num- 
ber of men from the Institute are going to follow the 
show to Northampton to see Its first performance on 
Monday, the 19th, and it looks as if this would be the 
most successful of the eleven shows which have been 
given. 



The play is a light traversty on the landing of the 
Pilgrims, and contains much of the author's keen wit. 
The scene of the first act Is laid in Holland, while the 
Pilgrims are there, just before sailing for America. 
The burgomaster, short and stout, with his six foot 
five assistants make a contrast which is amusing in the 
extreme, while Grimm and his secretary, Flotsam, 
who has six feet four to his credit, make another pair 
of comedians who are sure to raise a laugh. The 
show this year boasts some real singers, and J. L. 
Champagne, a freshman, has a fine baritone voice 
such as is rarely heard on the amateur stage. The 
music this year is exceptional, and there are many 
lyrics, topical and otherwise, which will make hits. 

The "girls" in the show are by no means behind 
the rest of the cast, and "Cherub" Belden Is more 
captivating than ever. Jacobs, who was also one of 
the leading ladies last year is back this year, and 
Arthur Campbell makes up thfl trio of beauties. There 
is a dancing sextette this year which has a Dutch 
dance in the first act, and a Spanish dance in the 
second, which will be as popular as the jump-rope and 
dust-pan dances in last years's production "Over The 
Garden Wall." Under the supervision of Coach 
Francis they have been practicing a number of new 
steps. The dance with the wooden shoes in the 
first act is especially effective. 

The fifty members of the chorus have been working 
as hard as the rest to make the show a success, and 
the stern Puritan maids form a contrast with the 
flaxen-haired Dutch girls and Indian brunettes. The 
costumes of the men are rather pictutresque also, 
especially the Indian make-up of the second act. 
Sydney A. Malcom, who wrote the show, and is playing 
the lead in the part of Grimm, introduces new jokes 
every day, and has many local hits which he is bring- 
ing into the lyrics and lines. All who saw last year's 
show will remember him in the parts of the uncle, 
and he is showing this year the same ability which he 
then showed in his rather small part. 

As far as can be judged at present, the show will 
make a hit in Northampton, and the sale of seats up 
to date seems to indicate that it may be difficult to 
obtain tickets later in the week. Not only is Smith 
College turning out in force, but a large contingent 
from Mt. Holyoke is coming over, and the number 
of seats taken up by Technology students, themselves, 
is by no means inconsiderable. On the whole the 
Tech boys feel warranted in their claim that their 
show is as good if not better than any other college 
production. 



1 






•5* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»59 



Alumni. 



TO THE ALUMNI. 

During the last two weeks I have sent bills to all 
the alumni who have not paid their subscriptions and I 
take this opportunity to call your attention to them in 
case they have been laid aside. 1 will be very grate- 
ful if you will please forward your amount at once. 

E. Farnham Damon, 
Business Manager. 

There is to be a dinner of the local alumni associ- 
tlon at Draoer Hall, M. A. C. Friday, April 23 at 7 
p M at $1.50 per plate. There will be a soc.al 
hour from six to seven. The senior class will act as 
hosts President Butterfield and Dean Mills are to 
be guests and will speak. There will be other 
speeches. All alumni, members of the faculty, and 
former students arc cordially invited to attend whether 
or not they receive any other notice than this. This 
is the last alumni dinner before commencement. 
The association desires all to attend who can to help 
make this dinner the best. 

The Signal is pleased to call attention to the 
Reunion Scheme as accepted by the associate alumn. 
in 1906, and published in the last number of the 
College and Alumni News. It suggests a new schedule 
for the class reunions at commencement by which 
the classes which knew each other in college will be 
here together. According to this plan, the reunions 
this year would be 73, 74, '75, '76, '92. '93. '94, 
'95 '04 *06 '08. Under the old system they 
would be 74, '79, '84, '89, '99, '04, '06. The 
advantages of the new scheme will be readily seen. 
The local alumni are anxious to have it carried out. 
The associate alumni secretary says that a good num- 
ber of classes have accepted It, and that some reun- 
ions will be held according to it this year, 
strongly urges that the rest do so at once. The plan 
must have the support of all, or it fails. Alumn,! 
Cooperate! The sooner the better. 

•92 —A reunion will be held in June, 1909. This 
brings the class into line with the new reunion scheme. 

H. M. Thomson, Sec. 
Amherst, March 28, 1909. 

75 __U is announced that Mayor Hibbard of Bos- 
ton has increased the salary of Herbert S. Carruth, 



assistant penal commissioner, from $2500 to $3500. 
This increase was made on account of the quality 
and character of Mr. Carruth's work. 

•78.— Dr. A. A. Brigham is in charge of the 
School of Agriculture just opening at the South 
Dakota Agricultural College. The school endeavors 
to reach boys and girls from the farm who cannot 
spend the time to go to college and want to get prac- 
tical training. 

'78.— Dr. Charles S. Howe, president of the 
Cleveland Chamber of Commerce and of the Case 
School of Applied Science, spoke on the evening of 
March 17, to 400 members and guests of the Boston 
Merchants' Association in Hotel Somerset, on "In- 
dustrial Education." Before the address an informal 
reception was tendered President Howe. He was 
the guest at lunch on the same day of some Boston 
retail merchants at the Parker House, and spoke 
briefly on cooperation in the retail trade of the city of 
Cleveland. 

•90. _ H. D. Haskins attended the first annual 
breakfast of the American Chemical Society at the 
Exchange Club, Boston, Feb. 19. He also lectured 
before the Market Gardeners' Association at Hal- 
ifax, on March 20. 

•91.— H. E. Crane. President's Hill, Quincy. 
•92.— G. E. Taylor is president of the Connecticut 
Valley Live-stock Breeders' Association. 

'94 _A part of the article, "Sick Trees, and How 
to Make them Well," which appeared in iht Saturday 
Evening Post for March 13, describes briefly the 
work which Prof. R. E. Smith has done. Professor 
Smith went from M. A. C. to California in 1901 to 
aid in the fight against asparagus rust. Under his 
direction it was a complete success. 

'95 — H. D. Hemenway made a trip South in 
March giving his illustrated lectures. "Children's 
Garden's in the United States." "The Care of 
Trees," "How to Plan Home Grounds." "How to 
Know our Common Trees and their Care." In the 
February Recreation he had an article. "The Recre- 
ation House-tent," and began in the same number 
of the Progressive Teacher (Nashville, Tenn) a series 
of articles on elementary agriculture dealing with the 
soils. 



'97.— P. H. Smith spoke on "The Food Value 
of Milk" at the Milk Consumers' meeting at Myrick 
Hall, Springfield, March 19. The next evening he 
gave a talk on the Agricultural college to the Pocum- 
tuck Club at South Hadley Falls. On March 31 he 
addressed the Marlboro Grange on "Handling and 
Production of Market Milk." 

'99, '05, '08. — M. A. C has three alumni on the 
faculty of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute \ Dr. 
W. E. Hinds, Professor of Entomology, P. F. Wil- 
liams, assistant in Horticulture, W. F. Turner, assist- 
ant in Entomology. 

'03.— Dr. H.J. Franklin, Assistant Professor of 
Entomology at the University of Minnesota, recently 
addressed the Wisconsin Cranberry Growers' Associ- 
ation on the insect enemies of the cranberry. 

'03. — W. E. Tottingham writes that at the College 
of Agriculture at Madison, Wis., where he is, he 
lectured to the short-course students this winter. 
The two-weeks' courses were attended by 1350. 
He is carrying on his work in Chemistry with the four- 
year men, and is also engaged in research work in 
Feeding Stuffs, 



'04. — Born, March 30, to Mr. and Mrs. Erwin S. 
Fulton, a daughter, Verabel. 

Ex- '04.— Married March 31 at Manchester. N.H., 
H. T. Witt of Belchertown to Amy B. Crombie. 

'05. — The class letter has been issued. 

'05. — G. H. Allen has a fine illustrated story about 
the care of trees in the last number of the Delineator. 

'05. — J. J. Gardner has just gone to New Jersey 
to take up the work of assistant horticulturist in the 
Baron de Hlrsch school. 

'05. — J. F. Lyman has been in town visiting his 
parents. 

'06. — L. H. Mosely plans to return for special 
post-graduate work. 

'07. — Married March 27, George H. Chapman to 
Miss A. J. Dick of Thomaston, Conn. 

'08. — Southwick, April 5, father and son were 
opposing candidates for tree warden in the town elec- 
tion. Edward Gillett. the Republican nominee, won 
easily over his son, Kenneth Gillett, the Democratic 
candidate, who accepted the result with the utmost 
good humor. 



Be sure you see the new TECH SHOW 

THAT PILL GRIMM 

A Musical Comedy in two acts written and played by the students of the 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Time Best 



College Shovir Ever Qlven 

GET YOUR TICKETS EARLY 



Academy of Music, Northampton. 

MONDAY EVE., APRIL 19 









■ 



REMEMBER THE DATE 



i6o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




GOODS FOR MEN 




My Woolens Are Now on the Market 

A great selection of imported and domestic goods, 
A big line of flannel trousers from $5.50-$! 2.00, 
and they are genuine and up to date in style. 
Guaranteed for first class fit and workmanship. 

Pressing, cleaning, dyeing and altering neatly 

done. 

FULL DRE SS SUITS TO RENT 

I. M. J^ABROVITX 

Amhkkst, Mass. 
11 Amity Street, phone 54-4 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMFOETED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 



Ralw's 3«n t 



Old South Street, off Main, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS 



Inter-Collegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

Colleg e Caps an d Gouws. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



Modem Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hump." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 



Bmneist House earner Slop 



Four First Class Barbers 



grocery department, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



Open Mondays from 


7 A. M. 


to 8 P. M 


Tuesdays ; 


, << 


6 ■ 


Wednesdays, ; 


. M 


8 «« 


Thursdays, 1 


M 


6 " 


Fridays, ; 


r " 


8 " 


Saturdays, ; 


r " 


n " 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 ' Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our FertUlzer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE C0E-H10RTID1EB CQITIPflHY. 



a4-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT 6, DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dealers Id High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 




ATHLETIC uniforms 
A SPECIALTY. 

It Is generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRKiHT & l>ITSON 
have the best looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 



The WRIOHT A DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIGHT «Xs DITSOX 

344 WASHINGTON ST.. boston 

18 WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 



Everything 
"For The Land's Sake" 

-\n Application of iooo lbs. per 
aero of a fertilizer containing 4/ 
nitrogen, 6% phosphoric acid and i<>$ 
potash irives to each pound of soil 
only 7-10 of a grain of actual combin- 
ed plant food, and in the case of 
nitrogen only 40 lbs. to 2,000,000 lbs. 
of soil. 

The kind and condition of the 
plant food supplied are as therefore 
important as the quantity. 

Study the plant food problem. 



ROWkPP FERTILIZER CI). 

U\f T T It L, IV 43 Chatham Si. Boston. 



BASE BALL 
SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

Telephone connections direct to our 
UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

IS. A. THOBfPSOir f 

Rear Fir-,t National Hank, AMHKKST 



Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 




Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

262 Fourth Avp , Nkw York. 




i 



1 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GonnBGUcut valley street Railway Qo. 

AMHKK8T DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Au.herstand Northampton on the hour and 
half hour from 6.30 am. till 10.80p.m. Sundays the first car 

win '"veatH^ao^.M.^^ OBE1 „ |BLU> MA „. 

John A.Tajrgart, Supt. 

Southampton OrricK, 102 Main St. 

C. W. Clapp. A est. Sup t. Telephone, Northampton, 1M-H . 

iDon'tTwalk on your Heels 

To d»t< your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

opposite Town Hall. 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1908. 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 

Care leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. *., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Care at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amheret. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amheret for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m., 12.18 p. m., 
express, and 5.38 p. u. The 5.88 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 

6.20 p. M. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



M. A. C. BANNERS, 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DBUE^S ORUO STORE 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH 



27 Main St. 



Northampton. 



Masonic Hlock, near Depot, Open every clay. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted for Its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Cloned only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTUBEK OP 

SODA WATERS, 

I'lneapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ulng-er 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



Kiveb Stkket, 



Southampton, Mass 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



M. A. C. '82, 



FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



DENTAU ROOMS, 



< I'TI.KK'S BLOCK AMHEK8T, M 



A88 



E- B. DICKINSON, U. LI. S. 
DENTAL BOOMS. 

WILLIAMS- HLOCK. ... A M HKKST, M ASS. 

0MMUI Hoi kn 
O TO IS A.. M., 1-30 TO ft J>. M. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



M.A.C.AK't, 



C. H.WICltll, 'OS* 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S^SATISFAOTION OU ARANTBBD. ♦ W 
M. A. UTLBY, Mmnmgir. 

OmCK : 

East Flesuaazit Street. 



Your Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATCH MAKER 



ii Amity St., 



Amherst, Mass. 



Mainspring*, i year Si oo 

Cleaning, g,'^ 

Prompt reliable work at Lowest Price*. 



The Children are Happy. 
Because ttieir clothes ere made on the New Home Hewimo 
Machine, which fact, asftures them of no "rips " Mothers 
should fret one at once as it will do for their children In years 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 









I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some dowers. Better than candy for results. 




OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



L. H. ToURTKLOTTK. 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., - 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Arthur E. Dorr. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DB4LERS AKD JOBBBBB IK 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts. , Basement 3 Union St. , 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE 



142 Main Street, 



Northampton, Mahs. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Largest Manufacturers In the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



Tel. 332-2. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AMHERST, MASS 



Uniform! 
for all 
Athletic 
Sport! 



Official 
Implements 

for all 
Track and 
Field Sport* 

Spalding 1 ! handwmely Illustrated catalogue of 
all "port! contains numerous suggestion. 
^ Mailed free anywhere 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



A. Q. SPALDINQ & BROS. 



73 Federal St., 




Boston. 



J. H.TROTT 

PLUU1BER. STEflPI & fiflS FITTER. 

HMD DEALER II STOVES HDD BRUGES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36.12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

, Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 

FDRNITUREand CARPET STORE 

▲ COMPLETE LINK OF GOODS 
81'ITKI) TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1861. 



EIMER& AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPOKTEES AN1> M ANCPACTUREKS OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASS-A/ST OOODS. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET . . . . 



We handle the bent of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



LEW 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TKaDE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



GERARD. N. LENA/. 

19 PLEASANT ST. REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MA88. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER 6 CO. 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



HMTtt$, 



AttHft$f , /ty$$. 






I 






flfeassacbusetts 



Bgricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



1. SHOUT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairt Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No eutrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
hieh schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2 A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
ftuL during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
nSveect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture General Horti- 
Tlture Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
ary Science^ Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modem Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

8. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Maw. 



Mas 
Agricviltux 

College 



'HE COLLE&E SMAL 



f OL. 19 



NO. 14- 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 28, 1909 








We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



page's Sftoe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




E. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VlOIilH, BflHJO, IHAIHDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the worlds 
best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 
branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

190 Pearl St., - - Hartford, Conn. 



H URBEIR'S 

VARIETY STORE. 
M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 1 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 28, 1909 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collbob Siohal, Amhbbst. Mass. Thb Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOAKD OF EDITOS8. 

WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. Editor-ln-Chlef. 
E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager. 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911, Assistant Business Manager. 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. College Notes. LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM, 1910, Alumni Notes. PARK W. ALLEN, 191 1. Department Notes. 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911, College Notes. HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, Special. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation Department. 
ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation Department. 



Terms , $1.00 per gear in advance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outaide of United States and Canada, Mc. extra. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket-Bail Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 
Track Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate, 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
R. H. Allen, Manager. 
R. C. Lindblad. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 
R. S. Eddy, Manager. 
Hockey Association. 



Fraternity Conference, 
Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 
Tennis Association, 
L. G Schermerhorn. Manager. 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad, Pres. 
H. W. Blaney. Manager. 
F. T. Haynes. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 
F. L. Thomas, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 
wmiu v «%»t«««n % MSB/tut. 



Editorials 



Informal May 1 



unsteadiness of our men making the other four runs 
possible. Our hitting was weak, no hits in twenty 
times at bat. 



The next issue of the Signal will appear May 12. 



The sketches to be found in the series "Massa- 
chusetts Aggies" will be continued indefinitely; they 
prove to be of much interest to the readers and have 
received much favorable comment. 

/Athletic No-Us- 



BASEBALL. 

Brown, 6; M. A. C, 0, 
Our baseball team lost to Brown April 14 at Prov- 
idence. On account of rain Umpire Lamigan called 
trie game in the seventh inning. Brown earned but 
two of her runs, the wetness of the field and the 



The score 



Nash, a., 
Dennie, c. f., 
Raymond, c. 
Requier. r. f.. 
Orcutt. 3b.. 
Budiong, 2b., 
Giles, lb., 
Staff, lb.. 
Bates, 1. f.. 
Warner, p., 
Clark, p., 

Total, 



O Grady, c. f.. 
Smith, 2b,, 
Hubbard, lb.. 
Williams, p., r., 
Tilton. 3b., 
Warner, r. f., 
French, c. 
Ackerman, s„ 
Curran, r. f.. p.. 
Totai, 



BROWtf. 



A.B. 


H. 


P.O. 


A, 


B. 


3 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 











J 


1 


6 


4 





3 


1 











3 


1 








1 


1 





3 


1 





1 


1 


3 





1 


1 





4 








2 


1 


2 








2 








3 











1 








21 


7 


21 


10 


3 


A.B. 


H. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


3 














2 








1 





2 





1 1 








1 








4 





3 





2 


1 


1 


2 














3 





3 


3 





2 











2 


2 





2 









20 



18 



Runs— Budiong 2, Orcutt. Giles, Bates, P. Warner. Sacrifice hits- 
Smith, Giles, Raymond. Budiong. Two-base hit— Giles. Stolen bases — 
Wi'liams. Budiong 2. Base on balls— Williams 4, Clark 2. Warner 2, 
Curran. Struck out by Warner 4. Clark 2, Williams 2. Curran, Double 
play— Tilton to Hubbard. Time— Ih. 25 min. Umpire— Lannigan. 







t 



162 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



>63 



The ball game scheduled for April 15 at Boston 
with Boston University was cancelled due to wet 
grounds. 



Tufts. 3; M. A, C, 2. 
Our baseball team suffered its second defeat April 
16, after having secured a lead of two runs. Hub- 
bard was in the box, and could not be hit until the 
last part of the seventh inning. Then, with two out, 
Hooper sent a hot grounder to left center for two 
bases, Clifford made two bases on a long drive to right 
center, Atwood got three on a drive that rolled into 
the pit in right, and scored the winning run when 
Dustin hit through short. 

In the second inning Warner, for M. A. C, 
reached first on a fumble by Dustin ■ he stole second 
and advanced to third on a wild pitch. French struck 
out, but Hosmer got his base on balls and stole sec- 
ond. Warner scored on Ackerman's sacrifice. 
O'Grady struck out, leaving Hosmer on third base. 
In the sixth, Smith made the second run on a sacri- 
fice by Warner and an error bv the opposing catcher. 
With the exception of Tuft's rally in the seventh 
inning the hitting on both sides was very light, the 
pitchers doing most of the work, Hubbard having 
eleven strike outs to his credit and Atwood eight. 
The score: 



M. A. C, 3; W. P. I- 2. 
The score of the Tufts game was reversed in the 
game on the following day against Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute. The game was played on the 
campus, and although it was a fairly fast one, there 
were but few hits. The real feature of the game 
was the pitching of Williams. He struck out eleven 
men and after the first three innings not a Worces- 
ter man reached first base. 

W. P. 1. scored her two runs in the second 
inning on two hits by Brown and Martin, a sacrifice 
by Halligan, and a long hit into center field by 
McKenney. For M. A. C, O'Grady scored in the 
third inning on an error, a sacrifice by Smith and a 
hit by Ackerman. In the seventh Inning Tilton and 
French reached first base and scored on a sacrifice 
by Hosmer and a long hit Into center field by Williams. 
The score : 



M. A. c. 

A.B. R. 



O'Grady, c. f„ 
Smith. 2b., 
Hubbard, p.. 
Williams, r. f.. 
Tilton, 3 b., 
Warner. 1. f.. 
French, c. 
Hosmer. lb., 
Ackerman, s., 
Bean,** 

Total, 



Dustin, s.. 
Dickinson, 3b., 
Priest, c. f„ 
Hal!, r. f., 
Knight, lb., 
McKenna. 2b., 
Hooper, r. f.. 
Clifford, c. 
Atwood. p.. 



4 

4 

3 

3 

4 

3 

4 

3 

3 

1 




I 





I 









B. 

1 
1 






1 



1 





P.O. 

2 
2 


2 
10 
11 





A. 


6 
3 
1 





1 







B. 





1 
1 









O'Grady. c. f. 
Smilh. 2b.. 
Ackerman. s., 
Hubbard, lb. 
Warner, '• f.. 
Tilton. 3b.. 
French, c, 
Hosmer. r. f., 
Williams, p., 

Total. 



Sanderson. 3b., 
Gaul. s.. 
Thomas. I. f.. 
Hedberg. 2b., 
Brown, lb., 
Martin, c. f., 
Halligan, r. f.. 
M;Kenney, c. 
Nims, p., 



M. A. C. 
A.B. 

4 
4 
2 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 

30 



R. 
1 






1 
1 






P.O. 

1 





12 



1 


2 



24 



A. 


2 
2 



1 

1 



4 

10 



I. 







1 




W. P. I. 



Total, 



32 

TUFTS. 

A.B. 

4 
3 
3 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

34 



R. 









1 

1 



B. 

1 
1 




1 



1 

2 
1 



27 



P.O. 

2 
1 
2 
2 

4 
I 
1 
9 
3 

2~6* 



II 



A. 

1 

1 





I 




1 



t.B. 


R. 


H. 


P.O. 


A. 


I. 


4 








1 


2 





4 














1 


4 


6 


1 


2 


1 





4 








3 


5 


1 


4 


1 


1 


12 


1 


1 


4 


I 


1 


1 





u 


3 

















3 

















2 











4 


1 



Total. 



32 



26* 



13 



<ienre— Tufts 3- M. A. C. 2. Two base hits-Clifford 2. Hooper. 
Kn£ht Three base h t-Atwood. Sacrifice hit- Priest. Base on balls- 
Sf Hubbard off Atwood 4. Struck out-by Hubbard 1 1 . by Atwood 8. 
Wild pftch-Atwood Balls-Atwood. Stolen bases-Warner 2. O'Grady. 
Hosmer, Dustin. Umpire— Foley. 
• O'Grady out, hit by batted ball. 
*• Batted for Ackerman in ninth. 



Sacrifice hits-Smith, Halligan. Stolen bases-O Grady 2 Smit. 
ton Thomas, French, McKenney. Two base h''-.™ "' Smith. Stn£ 
out-by Williams 1 1 . by Nims 3. Hit by pitched ball-T. ton -Do** 
play-Nims. Brown and Sanderson. Time lh. 45 mm. Umpire Mr 
bourn of Amherst. 

Holyoke League, 5 ; M. A- C, 0. 

Rain again interfered with our ball game, April 19, 
at Holyoke, stopping it in the middle of the sixth 
inning. Holyoke did all its scoring in the first, third. 
and fifth, and the only time when M. A. C. got 
things started her way was in the fourth, but tight 
fielding by the leaguers prevented our scoring. 

The score : 



HOLYOKE. 



DoUn.c. f.. 
McConnack, s. 
Perkins. 3b., 
bowers, lb.. 
Burke. !. f.. 
McCabe, r. f., 
Baker. 2b.. 
Beaumont, c, 
Be>levllle. p.. 



A.B. 


H. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


3 


1 


1 








2 


1 











3 














2 





4 








3 


1 








1 


3 


1 


1 








3 


1 


1 








3 


1 


6 


1 














2 






Total. 


22 

M. A. C. 


6 


15 


3 


1 




A.B. 


H. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


O'Grady, c f., 


3 





3 





1 


Smith, 2b., 


1 





3 


1 





Curran, p.. 


2 


2 





2 





Hubbard, lb., 


2 


1 


6 








Ackerman, i , 


2 








2 


2 


Warner, If., 


2 





1 








Tilton. 3b., 


2 








1 





French, r. f., 


2 





1 








Clancy, c. 


2 





1 





1 



Total, 



18 



15 



Run»— Perkins, Bowers. Dolan, McConnack, Burke. Sacrifice hit- 
Belleville, Stolen bate— Dolan. Two base hit— Hubbard. Base on baPs 
—Curran 2, Belleville. Struck out— by Belleville 8, by Curran 1 . Batter 
hit— Bowers. Wild pitch— Curran. Time— lh. 15 mln. Umpire — 
Geoffrey. 

M. A. C, 5; Williams, 3. 

Last Saturday, the ball team won Its third victory 
of the season. Williams was unable to hit Hubbard, 
and with proper support he would have registered a 
shut-out. 

The score : 



Warner, r.f., 
Grady, c.f., 
Hubbard, p., 
Thayer, l.f., 
Ackerman. S.3., 
Tilton. 3b., 
Smith, 2b., 
French, c, 
Hosmer, lb.. 

Totals. 



Hamilton, c.f.. 
Young, s.s., 
Wentworth, 2b., 
Mills, lb., 
Lewis, 3b, , 
Dodd. r.f., 
Davis, p., 
Rogers, l.f., 
Lambie, c. 
Savage, p., 
Oakley, r.f., 

Totals, 

Runs made — O'Grady. Ackerman. Smith, French, Hosmer. Dodd. 
Rogers, Lambie. Two-base hit— Hubbard. Stolen bases— Hamilton, 
Rogers. Base on balls — off Savage. Davis. Hubbard 5. Struck out— by 
Savage 5, Davis 5. Hubbard 8. Sacrifice hit-Smith. Hit by pitched ball 
—Hamilton 2. Passed bail— French. Umpire— Mackey. Time— 2h. 

The baseball schedule corrected to date is as 
follows : 

April 28— Tufts at Medford. 
30 — Bates at Amherst. 





B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 





1 



2 








1 




2 
1 



3 


4 



1 

1 






1 


3 



3 

1 


1 









1 










1 


10 


1 










8 










6 


27 


9 


4 


WILLIAMS. 












B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 




1 













2 


2 


1 













1 










7 













4 


3 













1 










1 










1 


I 





1 







12 


2 


2 































27 



e 



May 1 — Trinity at Amherst. 

8 — Amherst at Amherst. 
1 1 — Vermont at Amherst. 

15 — Boston College at Boston. 
19— Trinity at Hartford. 
21 — Vermont at Burlington. 
22 — Vermont at Burlington. 
24— Middjeburyat Middlebury. 
26 — Springfield Training School at Amherst. 
28 — Andover at Andover. 
29— Open. 
June 2 — Dartmouth at Hanover. N. H. 

4 — Holy Cross at Worcester. 

5 — Springfield Training School at Springfield. 

9 — New Hampshire State at Durham, N. H. 
12 — Boston College at Amherst. 
22 — Open. 

Dr. Reynolds, Physical Director of the college has 
arranged a series of interfraternity baseball games, 
each fraternity, and Including the non-fraternity men, 
to play one game each week. 



TENNIS. 

Manager Thomas of the tennis team is arranging a 
schedule of games with colleges and clubs. He has 
already secured Williams at Williamstown, Wesleyan 
at Amherst, and Northampton Country Club at 
Northampton. Saturday April 24, a practice game 
was played with Amherst. 



FOOTBALL 

The football coach for next year is Mr. Edward D. 
Rich '09, Dartmouth. He is an all-round player, 
having been fullback the first two years at Dartmouth, 
and guard the last two. His versatility makes him 
doubly valuable to a team employing only one coach. 
Mr. Rich Is Walter Camp's choice for the second all- 
American team of last year, and is one of Dart- 
mouth's most popular athletes. 

The schedule for next fall follows. Amherst is not 
to meet us, and offers as reasons some excuses that 
appear very unsatisfactory to Manager Allen. 
Sept. 25, University of Maine at Orono, Me. 
Sept. 29, Dartmouth at Hanover, N. H. 
Oct. 2, Union at Schnectady, N. Y. 
Oct. 9, Norwich University at Amherst. 



i 







164 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Oct. 16, Worcester Tech at Amherst. 

Oct. 23, Williams at Willtamstown. 

Oct. 30, Brown University at Providence, R. I. 

Nov. 6, New Hampshire at Manchester, N. H. 

Nov. 13, Springfield T. S. at Springfield. 

Nov. 20, pending at Amherst. 



REPORT OF M. A. C. TRACK ASSOCIATION. 

In accordance with the by-laws of the Athletic 
Board, 1 hereby submit the following report of the 
Track Team, for the season of 1908-'9, to be pub- 
lished in the College Signal. 

Receipts. 



Apportionment, 

Refunded by Dr. Reynolds, 



$185.00 
2.25 



Total. 


$187.25 


Expenditures. 




Cost of B. A. A., trip, 


$71.45 


Equipment, 


49.67 


Medical attendance and supplies, 


9.50 


Printing and stationary, 


3.75 


Telephone and telegraph, 


2.95 


Express, 


.35 


Registration and entries, 


6.50 


Relay with Amherst, 


1.20 


Incidental expenses, 


1.88 


Payment on track, 


40.00 



Total, 
Approved, (Signed), 

Lamert 
John N. Summers, Auditor. 



$187.25 



S. Corbett, Mgr. 



Colleg* N°**S- 



The Class of 1910 will have its banquet at the 
Hotel Garde, Hartford, Ct., Friday evening, May 14. 

The Du Pont Powder Co. gave an exhibition of 
stump blasting on the college farm on last Friday 
morning. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh spoke to the Y. M. C. A. on 
Thursday evening April 15, and Prof. W. R. Hart 
spoke to the same association on Thursday evening, 
April 22. 



Harold D. Phelps, '09, finished seventh in the 
Marathon road race held April 19 In Springfield under 
the auspices of the Rockrimmon Boat Club. He re- 
ceived a silver match safe as prize. E. M. Brown, 
'11, also ran. 

After May 5, the Wednesday Assemblies will be 
omitted for the remainder of the year except for the 
prize speaking contests. The first of these is sched- 
uled to come on May 19, and will be by the Fresh- 
man Class for the Burnham prizes of $25 and $15. 
The Flint prize speaking will be given May 26 by 
members of the Junior class. 

The Debating Club met Thursday night, April 22. 
The question, "Resolved, that commercial reciproc- 
ity between the United States and Canada would be 
for the best interests of the United States," was 
argued in the affirmative by 0. B. Briggs, '09, and 
P. P. Cardin, '09. The negative was upheld by 
John Noyes, '09, and Benj. G. Southwick, '12. 

The Senior Class took the opportunity of the holi- 
day April 19, to plant their class tree. The commit- 
tee, H. G. Noble, D. J. Caffrey, and T. C. Waters, 
selected a large elm tree from the "ravine." The 
tree is about 35 feet high and 18 inches in diameter 
at the base. It was planted in front of Clark Hall, 
near the northwest corner. The moving was under 
the direction of Dr. G. E. Stone and the members 
of the botany class pursuing the tree course. It is 
the largest piece of work in this line ever attempted 
on the campus or even in the town. The class is 
now cleaning out many of the larger cavities in the 
trees on the campus and filling them with cement. 

The Ways and Means Committee of the State 
Legislature visited the college Saturday, April 17. 
and examined into the needs of the college. In the 
morning they met the students in the Chapel and 
these members of the committee spoke : Mr. Pope 
of Leominster, a cousin of Eldred '73, Mr. Breed of 
Lynn, Mr. O'Brien of Boston, Mr. Henry J.Turner. 
Auditor of the State, and Mr. Hosmer of Amherst, 
through whose influence the committee visited the 
college. The students took this opportunity to show 
the committee their spirit and enthusiasm by cheering 
each speaker and by singing the college song. The 
members of the committee expressed themselves as 
being very favorable toward the bill. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'65 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

April 29.— Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m.. in Chapel. 
30. — Baseball Game, Bates, on Campus. 
May 1. — Baseball Game, Trinity, on Campus. 
Informal. 4-00 p. m . in Drill Hall. 
2.— Bible Study Classes, 4-00 p. m., In 

Chapel. 
4. — Rehersal, Junior Play, 7-00 p. m., in 

Chapel. 
5. — Assembly, J. Horace McFarland, In 

Chapel. 
6.— Stockbridge Club, J. Horace McFarland. 
8.— Baseball Game, Amherst, at Pratt Field. 
9.— Bible Study Classes, 4-00 p. m., In 

Chapel. 
1 I. — Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p. m., in Agricul- 
tural Room. 
Rehersal, Junior Play, 7-00 p. M., in 

Chapel. 
Baseball Game, Vermont, on Campus. 
12. — Assembly, Mr. James L. Tryon. 



PROGRAM FOR COMMENCEMENT, 1909. 

Flint and Burnham contests to be held about the first 
of June. 

Friday, June 18. 

8-00 p. m. Play by the Junior class. 

Saturday, June 19. 

3-00 p. m. Sophomore- Freshman baseball game. 

Sunday, June 20. 

4-30 p. m. Baccalaureate address by President 
Butterfield. 

Monday, June 21. 

Phi Kappa Phi. 
Prize drills and Battalion drill. 
Open air concert and sing. 
Fraternity banquets. 
Tuesday, June 22. 
Trustees' meeting, Baseball game. 
10-30 a. m. Business meeting of the alumni. 
1-00 p. m. Alumni dinner. 
4-00 p. m. Class Day exercises. 



11-00 a. m. 
3-30 p. m. 
7-00 p. m. 
8-30 p. m. 

9-00 A. M. 



6-00 p. M. Class reunions. 
8-00 p. m. Trustees' reception. 

Wednesday, June 23. 
10-00 a. m. Commencement exercises. 

Address by Hon. Gllfford Pinchot, 
U. S. Forester. 

8-00 p. m. Senior-Sophomore promenade. 



INFORMAL 

The first of the spring informals took place Satur- 
day afternoon, May 17, and was especially well 
attended both on account of the fine day and the 
interesting ball game with Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute which most of the people witnessed before 
the dance. Dancing began a little later than usual 
but there was ample time for all of the engagements 
with an hour for luncheon at Draper Hall. Between 
the dances, the couples enjoyed a stroll about the 
campus which helped to make the whole affair more 
enjoyable. 

The hall was prettily decorated with festoons of 
bunting and many banners about the walls. The 
large flag partitioned off the north end of the floor. 
Many potted plants from the Horticultural Depart- 
ment were effectively used. The patronesses' corner 
was tastily set off in one corner under the balcony and 
punch was served from a table in the opposite end. 

These occasions, which now occur so frequently 
here at M. A. C, should be better patronized by the 
student body. They are the only real social events 
which we have and this should prompt many more fel- 
lows to support them. 

The patronesses were: — Mrs. S. F. Howard, Mrs. 

E. A. White, Miss Joslyn of Smith, and Miss God- 
dard of Mt. Holyoke. Those attending were: — 1909 
— W. D. Barlow, G. M. Codding, L. S. Corbett, H. 
P. Crosby, A. W. Hubbard, H. G. Noble, J. Noyes, 
H. D. Phelps, M. W. Thompson, H. W. Turner, C. 
R. Webb: 1910— R. H. Allen, J. P. Blaney, L. 
Brandt, H. A. Brooks, L. C. Brown, H. T. 
Cowles, W. A. Cloues, E. F. Damon, L. 
S. Dickinson, R. S. Eddy, J. N. Everson, 
J. C. Folsom, W. E. Johnson, S. W. Mendum, 

F. P. Nlckless, F. A. Partridge, A F. Rockwood, 
W. M. S. Titus, M. S. Hazen, W. E. Leonard, H. 



[66 



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,67 







R. 
W 
F. 
L. 



Francis, J.C.Bailey; 191 1— P. W. Allen, H. 
Blaney, J. E. Dudley, N. H. Hill, H. H. Howe, 
D. McGraw, R. S. McNayr, G. P. Nlckerson, 
O. Stevenson, F. A. Prouty, E. L. Winn ; 1912 
T. Finnegan, E. M. Folger, W. E. Philbrick, 
H. C. Walker;— P. V. Goldsmith, O. M. Clarke, 'OS, 
J. R. Parker, '08, W. S. Regan, '08, R. D. Whit- 
marsh, '08. R. H. Verbeck, '08, and K. R. 
Thompson. 



REUNION OF THE LOCAL ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION. 

The fourth annual meeting and supper of the local 
Alumni Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College was held at Draper Hall, Friday evening 
April 23, 1909. The Senior Class acted as hosts 
and the college quartet furnished music. 

Judge Lyman, the retiring president of the associ- 
ation acted as toastmaster and called first upon Presi- 
dent Butterfield. The president spoke of the prog- 
ress of the bill before the Legislature and of the 
increased attention being paid to the college by out- 
side men. 

Dean Mills spoke of having been with the college 
for nearly half of its history and of the new era he 
had seen open up. He closed with this sentiment, 
"May the alumni learn to conserve youth in the dig- 
nity of manhood." Captain Martin spoke of his 
adventures in the Philippines, Professor Hart spoke 
on Co-operation, and A. W. Hubbard '09 spoke for 
the Senior class. The evening closed with the sing- 
ing of the college song. 

Previous to the supper these officers were elected 
for the following year : 
' President, David D. Barry, '90. 

1st Vice-President, C. W. Clapp, '86. 
2d Vice-President, F. 0. Williams, "90. 
3d Vice-President, A. C. Monahan, '00. 
Secretary, S. B. Haskell, '04. 
Treasurer, A. V. Osmun, '03. 
Auditor, J. E. Deuel, '92. 



'90. — F. W. Mossman, at a recent meeting in 
Boston to organize the Massachusetts State Poultry 
Associatian, was elected chairman of the seventh 
district, comprising the north section of Worcester 
county. 



SOME "MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES" WHOM 

I KNOW. 

[To be Continued.] 

VII. Frederick Albion Ober, author, explorer 
and naturalist, was born at Beverly in 1849; in resi- 
dence with class of 72 at M. A. C. for one year ; 
hunted birds in Florida and explored Lake Okeechobe 
region, 1872-74; engaged in naturalist's work at 
Centennial exposition; under the auspices of the 
Smithsonian Institution, spent twenty-five months in 
the lesser Antilles researching their ornithology, dis 
covering twenty new species of birds besides sending 
to the Institution many type specimens previously not 
In its collection. A second trip in 1880 resulted in 
two more species, making twenty-two in all, which 
record was said at the time to have been greater 
than the work of any one man since the time of 
Audobon ; these species were investigated and named 
by the veteran ornithologist, Mr. George M. Law- 
rence, after comparison with the specimens in the 
great museums of Europe and two are called 
Myiarchus Oberl and Icterus ODers. Having become 
interested in the historical features of the West In- 
dies though following to some extent the voyages of 
Columbus, Mr. Ober, for several years thereafter 
devoted himself to a study of the Spanish Conquest 
of America and went to Mexico in 1881, where he 
remained the greater part of the year ; there he fol- 
lowed the march of Cortes throughout Mexico and 
studied the ancient history of the country, among his 
side trips making an ascent of Popocatepetl, its high- 
est volcano, and riding a thousand miles through 
southern Mexico, horse-back and mule-back, in 
search of the gold mines of Montezuma. A few 
years later, he went to Spain and North Africa and 
then again to the West Indies and the north coast of 
South America; in 1891 he received from President 
Harrison an appointment as Commissioner to the 
West Indies for the Columbian Exposition, passing 
two years in these islands in thorough investigation of 
everything pertaining to Columbus and his early 
voyages. For this work he received the Exposition 
diploma and medal. During ten years he lectured 
on the countries he had visited before the Lowell In- 
stitute of Boston, Peabody Institute of Baltimore 
and Geographical Society ot New York. Is a charter 



member and director of the Explorers' Club, life 
member American Antiquarian Society, correspond- 
ing member New York Academy of Sciences, 
member M. A. C. Club of New York, etc. A list of 
his contributions to ephemeral literature (newspapers 
and magazines) it is impossible to make ; booklist of 
his contributions to the permanent literature of history, 
discovery and nature herewith ; 1879, Camps in the 
Caribbees; 1882, Young Folks' History ot Mexico; 
1883, The Silver City; 1884, Travels in Mexico; 
1885, Montezuma's Gold Mines; 1886, Mexican 
Resources; 1893, In the Wake of Columbus ; 1894; 
same Special Columbian Edition de Luxe; 1895, 
Josephine, Empress of the French ; 1896, My Spanish 
Sweetheart and Under the Cuban Flag; 1897, The 
True Crusoe's Island; 1898, A Brief History of 
Spain; 1899, Puerto Rico and its Resources; 1900, 
The Storied West Indies; 1901, The Last of the 
Arawaks, and A Bjy Among the Pueblos ; 1902, The 
Boy Buccaneers; 1903, Two Boys with Columbus; 
1904, "Old Put," the Patriot, With the War 
Chiefs, Our West Indian Neighbors, and History of 
Mexico, Central America and Cuba; 1905, With 
Csceola the Seminole; 1906, A Friend of King 
Philip; 1907, A Guide to the West Indies;— Heroes of 
American History Series; Columbus and the West 
Indies; Cortes and the Conquest of Mexico; Balboa 
and the Pacific Ocean; De Soto and the Invasion of 
Florida; Ponce de Leon and Port Rico ; Vespucci 
and South America; Cabot's Voyages to North 
America ; Magellan and the Philippines ; Sir Walter 
Raleigh and America. — Knockabout Club Series. — 
1887, Everglades; 1888, Antilles; 1889, Spain; 
1890, North Africa; 1891, Spanish Main; 1892, 
Search of treasure. Married 1894, Miss Nellie F. 
McCarthy of West Somerville ; one daughter and 
one son. Mr. Ober is now employing his unusual 
ability and experience as a naturalist and writer in the 
promotion of suburban realty, thus changing the 
habitat of the city dweller to one closer to nature. 
Address, Anderson Street, Hackensack, New Jersey. 

Dr. John A. Cutter, '82. 



'08,— H. E. Alley, Spreckles Sugar Co., Branch 
3, King City, Cal. He is engaged in the beet sugar 
industry. The company has 13,000 acres under 
cultivation. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '87 
/5, Experiment Stations. 

The idea of establishing an experiment station at 
the college appears to have developed quite naturally 
from the experiments carried on in the early '70's by 
Clark, Goessmann and Stockbridge. As early as 
1873 we find the trustees expressing deep regret that 
no fund had been provided, either by the State or by 
individuals, to defray the necessary expense of carry- 
ing on through a term of years a well-ordered and 
systematic course of experiments for the Improve- 
ment of agricultural science and practice. "The 
land," they said, "the scientific investigators and the 
apparatus are all ready at Amherst, but the work 
cannot go forward until at least one thousand dollars 
per annum has been pledged to defray unavoidable 
expenses." 

The fourteenth annual report of the trustees (Feb- 
ruary, 1877) presented strong arguments in favor of 
establishing such a station, and statement was made 
that the great want of Massachusetts agricult- 
ure was a series of accurate, careful and scientific 
experiments, extending over a sufficient period of time 
to determine positively and authoritatively the vast 
number of questions that were constantly coming up 
in the experience of every farmer and every gardener 
who cultivate the soil. The trustees also said that 
there was a vague notion among the people that this 
was the work of the Agricultural College, and that it 
was its peculiar duty to arrange and carry on a broad 
system of investigation and experiment, as if it had 
no other work to do, and with all the appliances which 
an adequate plan of experiment implied ; that the 
college had never refused, nor was it at all inclined 
to refuse, to meet the wants of the farming commu- 
nity in this direction, but it should be born in mind 
that experiments, to be of any value, required not only 
time and ability, but a liberal expenditure of money, 
and that they had absolutely no money at their dis- 
posal for this purpose. They felt the time could not be 
far distant when the system of agricultural experiment 
stations, which had been found so valuable and so 
serviceable in Europe, would be recognized and 



! 









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169 



I 



adopted here, and that when It did come, it would do 
more than anything else to promote the rapid devel- 
opment of the resources of the commonwealth. 

"Prof. Stock" met the emergency in his usual 
business-like way and in January, 1878, generously 
offered the sum of one thousand dollars to defray the 
necessary expenses, for one season, of an experimen- 
tal station at the college, provided the trustees would 
authorize its establishment. This they did, and 
President Clark, Professor Stockbridge, Proiessor 
Goessmann, Secretary Charles L. Flint and Hon. 
Richard Goodman were appointed a committee to 
organize, conduct and determine what experiments to 
undertake. They soon after held a meeting, as- 
signed subjects for investigation to different mem- 
bers, and appropriated the money to defray the cost 
of apparatus and necessary assistance. The results of 
the year's labors, so far as prepared for publication, 
were appended to the sixteenth annual report of the 
trustees (February, 1879). They comprised a 13- 
page report by Professor Goessmann on "Early 
Amber Cane," and a 36-page illustrated report by 
Professor Stockbridge on experiments on the de- 
portment of soils towards water and various manures 
by the use of the lyslmeter. It was found necessary 
to suspend systematic operations at the close of the 

year. 

An unsuccessful attempt was made in the Legisla- 
ture of 1880 to establish an Experiment Station at 
the Agricultural College for testing fertilizers. 

The State Board of Agriculture early in 1881 in- 
structed its secretary to petition the Legislature for 
the establishment of an experimental station at the 
Agricultural College. The Essex Agricultural So- 
ciety at a farmers' institute in December of that 
year expressed the opinion that it was of the highest 
importance to the agricultural interests of the State 
that the Legislature appropriate a sufficient sum of 
money to establish an agricultural experiment station, 
and similar action was taken by the Hingham Agri- 
cultural and Horticultural Society. Copies of a 
printed petition were also circulated for signatures and 
several such received were presented to the Legisla- 
ture of 1882. This printed petition, among other 
things, asked for such legislation as would provide for 
an experiment station in connection with the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, with an annual appro- 



priation sufficient for its maintenance. 

The result of this effort was the passage of "An 
Act to establish an Agricultural Experiment Station" 
(Acts of 1882, Chapter 212), which was approved by 
Governor John D. Long on May 12. This act pro- 
vided for the establishment and maintenance of an 
agricultural experiment station at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College in the town of Amherst. The 
management was vested in a board of control of seven 
persons, two of whom were to be trustees of the col- 
lege elected by the trustees. The president of the 
college was also made a member and not subject to 
retirement at the end of a stated term as was the 
case with elected members. 

The board of control was authorized to appoint a 
director, a chemist, and all necessary assistants, and 
was to provide suitable and necessary apparatus and 
appliances for the purpose of conducting experiments 
and investigations in the following subjects: —First, 
The causes, prevention and remedies of the diseases 
of domestic animals, plants and trees; Second, The 
history and habits of insects destructive to vegeta- 
tion, and the means of abating them; Third, The 
manufacture and composition of both foreign and 
domestic fertilizers, their several values and their ad- 
aptability to different crops and soils; Fourth, The 
values, under all conditions, as food for all farm ani- 
mals, for various purposes, of the several forage, 
grain and root crops ; Fifth, The comparative value of 
green and dry forage, and the cost of producing and 
preserving it in the best condition; Sixth, The adul- 
teration of any article of food intended for the use of 
men or animals ; and in any other subjects which 
might be deemed advantageous to the agriculture and 
horticulture of the Commonwealth. 

The first meeting of the Board of Control was held 
at the Executive Chamber, Boston, July 23, 1882. 
Organization was effected and a committee chosen to 
nominate a director and other officers and to suggest 
suitable apparatus. A second meeting was held the 
following November, when Prof. C. A. Goessmann 
was appointed director and chemist ; Prof. Manly 
Miles, superintendent of field and stock experiments; 
and Prof. S. T. Maynard, microscopist. 

The Board of Control was made a body corporate 
under the name of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
Experiment Station by the Legislature of 1887, and 



the number of members was increased to eleven by 
the Legislature of 1888. After the passage by Con- 
gress in 1887 of the "Hatch Act" (So-called after 
House Chairman Hatch of the Committee of Agri- 
culture,) establishing agricultural experiment stations 
in connection with the land grant colleges, the trustees 
established the Hatch Experiment Station of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, with the late 
President Goodell as director. In 1894-95 the Leg- 
islature consolidated the two stations, doing away 
with the Board of Control and State Station as such, 
and in 1907 changed the name of the station back to 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station. 



TEACHERS' INSTITUTE. 

A high school teachers' institute was held at the 
college April 16th and 17th. Julius E. Warren of 
Boston, agent of the state board of education presided 
at the morning and afternoon sessions. At 9-45 the 
opening exercises took place, Rev. W. T. Anderson 
of Amherst offering prayer. The college quartette 
sang. Then Mr. Warren spoke of the close con- 
nection of the college and the public schools and 
introduced President Butterfield. In his address 
President Butterfield said that the college is working 
for the people of the rural districts especially. He 
told of the work of the college and for what it stands 
among educated people. 

The meeting of the English section was held in 
Clark Hall. Alfred M. Hitchcock of Hartford High 
School spoke on "Composition." Charles S. 
Thomas then spoke on the subject of literature. 

The history section met in French hall and was 
addressed by Arthur C. Boyden, principal of the 
Bridgewater State Normal School, on the subject of 
"History. " He spoke on the purpose of history and 
gave suggestions for teaching the subject. Miss 
Mabel Hill of the Lowell State Normal school spoke 
on "Civics." 

The meeting of the mathematics section was in 
Wilder hall. William B. Hunter of the industrial 
department of the Fitchburg High School gave a talk 
on "Shop Mathematics". Mr. Wallace E. Mason, 
superintendent of the North Andover schools, spoke 
on "Geometry without a text book." 

The science section met in Wilder Hall and opened 
with an address on physics by Howard C. Kelley. 



He said the subject was taught in high schools too 
much for the students going to college and not enough 
for those who went no farther. Owing to illness 
Wallace E. Richmond could not be present and Mr. 
Kelley took his subject of "Some Practical Applica- 
tions of Chemistry," and showed how common foods 
on the market could be tested. 

Henry C. Morrison of Concord N.H., state superin- 
tendent of public instruction, addressed the language 
section in French hall. 

The musical section met in the chapel and Ralph 
L. Baldwin, director of music at Hartford discussed 
"Music in Secondary Education," Charles I. Rice, 
director of music in the Worcester schools, talked on 
"Some Practical Problems in Music Teaching. 

The drawing section met in Wilder Hall Frederic 
L. Burnham, agent of the board for the promotion of 
manual arts, was the only speaker of the session and 
gave an outline of art education. 

The meeting of the commercial section was in 
Clark hall. Arthur J. Meredith, head of the com- 
mercial department of the Saiem High School, spoke 
on "Bookkeeping Made Practical," Carlos B. Ellis of 
Springfield Technical High School spoke on "Com- 
mercial English." 

The afternoon session was general. Mr. Morrison 
spoke in the college chapel on "Education for Ser- 
vice." The next speaker was Earl Barnes of Phila- 
delphia, who gave an address on "Moral Education." 
After this the teachers were conducted about the 
grounds and given an opportunity to see the college 
buildings. 

At the evening session Professor Hart presided. 
The college quartet rendered a selection in opening. 
George H. Martin, secretary of the state board of 
agriculture was unable to be present and Earl Barnes 
of Philadelphia took his place speaking on "The Lower 
Nerve Centers." 

The Saturday session opened at 9-30 with an 
address on "Science in the Rural High School," by 
A.C. Monahan. Mr.R.H.Verbeck and Mr. Paul A. 
Davis both spoke on "The Greenhouse and School 
Garden as Laboratories." John R. Parker then spoke 
on "Adaptation of the Laboratory to the Teaching of 
Agriculture. " Then came a discussion conducted by 
F. F. Hutchings. 

Philip Emerson then spoke on the subject, "How 






170 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



to Handle the School Garden for Agriculture during 
Vacation " 0. M. Clark next gave a talk on, 
••School Gardens in Cities." P. B. Jenks gave the 
report of the committee on public school agriculture 
with illustrative experiments. Frank L. Boyden 
spoke on "Some Social Function? of the Rural High 

School." . u , 

The closing event of the institute was the Head 
Masters' Club dinner at Draper hall. George I. 
Aldrich, a member of the state board of education, 
gave an address. 



ANNUAL STUDENT CONFERENCE AT 
NORTHFIELD. 

This year's meeting, the Twenty-fourth Annual 
Student Conference for the Eastern States and Can- 
ada will open at East Northfield on Friday, July 2, 
and will end on Sunday, July II. It is thus a week 
later than usual and it is yet to be shown whether this 
change will add to or decrease the attendance. 

Mr John A. Addison, treasurer of the executive 
body of the International Committee of Young Men's 
Christian Associations, and business manager of the 
conference, is most optimistic as to the outlook for 
1909 Nearly a thousand men-student delegates, 
leaders, speakers, and visitors-attended the confer- 
ence last year and it is already practically assured 
that the number will fall little short of that when the 
initial gathering is called on July 2, 1909. 
General Outline of Program. 
While the program is still in a rather chaotic state, 
the general outline will be the same as in former 
vears The entire conference is divided into groups 
of eight or ten for Bible study, each group having »ts 
own leader and meeting at about 9:30 each morn- 
ing Previous to that gathering, the various group 
leaders will hold a preliminary normal session with 
the head conference Bible study directors, who will 
be this year Professor L. H. Miller of Princeton and 
Professor Henry D. Wright of Yale, assisted it is 
expected by " Tad " Jones. Yale '08. Follow.ng 
the Bible study hour, the men will join together for 
informal discussion of city and college problems until 
the big platform meeting in the auditorium, which 
is scheduled for 11 o'clock each day. After the 
noon dinner, there will be no official events until the 



famous •« Round Top " meeting for discussion of vo- 
cations, which is followed by the second platform 
meeting at 8 o'clock. 

Good List of Speakers. 
To address these large gatherings, the committee 
considers itself fortunate in having already secured 
the following well-known speakers, although the list 
is not yet by any means complete : Dr. John Kel- 
man of Edinburgh, Rev. Henry Sloan Coffin, D. D 
and Rev. H. Roswell Bates of New York, Rev. John 
Douglas Adams of East Orange, N. J.. Dean Edward 
I Bosworth of Oberlin, Ohio. Rev. John Timothy 
Stone of Baltimore, Md., Dr. Samuel M. Zwemer 
of Arabia, Dr. Wilfred T. Grenfel of the Labrador 
coast, and Mr. Clayton S. Cooper, secretary of the 
B.ble study department of the International Commit- 
tee Mr Cooper is now on his way around the world, 
engaged in the organization of Bible study work, and 
will come from Persia and India, through San Fran- 
cisco, d.rect to the conference. Mr. Robert H. 
Davis is to lead the general singing. 

The Big Celebration. 
Owing to the fact that Independence Day-the 
usual date for the large celebration and general jam- 
boree-comes this year on a Sunday, it is expected 
that Tuesday or Wednesday, the 6th or 7th, will be 
selected to contain the field sports, the patriotic ad- 
dresses, and the large evening meeting. This day is 
always looked forward to with particular interest, and 
it is expected that this year will be no exception to 

the rule. 

Every M. A. C. man should make a strenuous 
effort to be present at this conference, if not for the 
entire session, at least for July 6. Come and bring 
the spirit of the college with you- 



DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE. 
The department of landscape gardening has been 
enjoying another picture show. This has been sup- 
plied by a set of 30 landscape photographs sent by 
Mr C F. Clarke of Springfield. They are an un- 
usually fine lot of pictures and show how many line 
effects can be secured in landscape gardening. Pro- 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'?• 



fessor Waugh has also arranged for an exhibit of ar- 
tistic portrait photographs. While these are not directly 
in the line with landscape gardening, they are ex- 
pected to throw some light on methods of artistic 
composition, and so be of indirect benefit. 

A large shipment of fruit trees has been received 
by the department of pomology from England. These 
are mostly dwarf trees and are to form a new dwarf 
fruit garden to replace the one taken out for the loca- 
tion of French Hall. 

Professor Waugh lectured Wednesday night for the 
Edgewood Civic Improvement Association of New 
Haven, Ct. 

Applications for men continue to pour into the Di- 
vision of Horticulture from all parts of the country. 
Men are wanted for all sorts of work, but especially 
for teaching and experimental work in pomology, 
landscape gardening and floriculture. Good salaries 
are offered and there are not nearly men enough to 
supply the demand. 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT. 

Professor R. W. Neal is giving a series of inter- 
esting readings on Wednesday evenings in the English 
room. He has so far given the following selections : 
"Aucassin and Nicolete," "Rubaiyat of Omar 
Khayyam," "Golden Age" (Kenneth Graham,) and 
selections from "Pickwick Papers." 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

The coming Commencement Drill will differ in 
part from its usual program of other years. It will 
come on Monday afternoon of Commencement week 
and will last for two hours. In addition to the usual 
battalion parade, review and inspection, there will be 
prize drills by companies, squads, and individual men. 
After these, Company A will execute the bayonet 
drill, Company B the Butt's Manual and Calisthen- 
ics, and Company C, Guard Mount. The program 
will close with the publication of prizes and the pro- 
motions in the battalion for the following year. 



Alu 



mm. 



'95. — C. B. Lane had an article in a recent Issue 
of Country Gentleman, 



71.— An illustrated article concerning the senior 
alumnus of M. A. C, G. H. Allen of Ne* Bedford, 
appeared in the Boston Globe for April 1 1 . 

71.— W. H. Bowker had an article in the March 
American Fertilizer. 

'86. — Prof. G. E. Stone lectured recently before 
the Village Improvement Association at Farmington, 
Conn. He also attended a banquet and meeting of 
tree workers in New York City. The meeting was 
for the formation of a National Association of Tree 
Workers for mutual co-operation in this work and 
advancement of scientific methods. The charter 
members include only the best known firms of the 
country. Among them were H. L. Frost & Co., 
and Whittaker and Munson. 

'94.— A. H. Kirkland of Huntington visited college 
recently. 

'02. — Born, March 24, to Mr. and Mrs. Orrln F. 
Cooley, a daughter, Dorothy May, 

'02,— The Oregon Agricultural College Experiment 
Station issued in February, its Bulletin No. 104 on 
"Pollination of the Apple" by C. I. Lewis, and C. 
C. Vincent. 

'05.— H. L. Barnes left his position as Horticul- 
turist at the Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va., in 
June, 1908 because of ill health. From then until 
Nov. I, he was superintendent for H. L. Frost & 
Co., when he took charge of his father's farm at 
Stockbridge. On April 5, he was elected tree warden 
at the town meeting, being on both tickets. 

'05.— F. A. Bartlett has been taken into the firm 
of H. L. Frost & Co., and is located at Hartford. 
Conn. 

'05.— John F. Lyman, who is a candidate for the 
Ph. D. degree in Physiological Chemistry ai Yale 
University this year, has been elected Associate Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Chemistry at the Ohio State 
University for next year. 

'07.— Married. Dec. 31, 1908, W. F. Chase to 
Miss Florence McDermit of Middleboro. Chase is 
engaged in landscape at Portland, Ore. Address, 
455 East Eighth Street, North, Portland, Ore. 









I 7 2 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




GOODS FOR MEN 




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Tuesdays 
Wednesdays, 
Thursdays, 
Fridays, 
Saturdays, 



a. m. to 8 P. M. 

H 6 " 

« 8 " 

M 6 *' 

«« 8 " 

•« 11 



K 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRANO FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the Collegt Signal. 



THE COE- 



a4-26 Stone Street, 





NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

sUatBactocrs and Dealers in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Bafl Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It hi generally conceded 
that the club* equipped 
by WRIOrlT et IMTSON 
have the beat looking, 
beat fitting and most 
durable aulta. 




The WRIGHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 



CATALOGUE FREE 



344 WASHINGTON 

18 WEST 30TH ST. 

Chicago Providence, R. 



ST., BOSTON 
. NKW YORK 
I. Cambridge, Mass. 



Everything 
"For The Land's Sake" 



If phosphoric acid exercises a catalytic 
action in the soil, and there is no doubt of it, 
then the experiments of Lawes and Gilbert, 
as well as results in practical crop growing, 
indicate that it is the soluble phosphoric acid 
which possesses this quality, and that the 
insoluble phosphoric acid does not possess it 
at all. 

This should lead us to prefer superphos- 
phate, acid phosphate, dissolved bone and 
dissolved bone black in place of phosphate 
rock, phosphate slag, etc. 

Study the plant food problem. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 

43 Chatham St., Boston 



SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

K. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Bank, . AMHERST 




Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and J loads. 

COX SONS A VINING. 

262 Fourth Av»* , Nkw Yokk. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Gonnecticiu Vaueu Subbi Raiiwau Go. 

AMHKHHT DIVISION. 

Will »••*•*» ^foriM. GREENFIELD, MASS. 

John A.TaKgart.Supt. 

^on^Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Coiue to nie for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall. 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO OCT. 4, 1908. 



Amherst & Mid Street Railway Co. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.41 a. m m 12.13 p. *., 
express, and 5.38 p. m. The 5.38 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.15 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, ami 

6.20 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



M . A. C. BANNERS 



$4.00 



3 ft. by 6 ft., - 

Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



DEUBL'S 



DRUGr STORE 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 



17 Main St., 



Northampton. 



Masonic Itlock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigar* Noted for its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTURER OP 

SODA WATERS, 

1'lneapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



Kites Stkkbt, 



Northampton, Mass 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



M. A. C. '82, 



FLORIST, 

Store, It Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



O. S. GATES, !>.!>.«. 
DENTAb ROOMS, 



CUT KICK'S BLOCK, 



AMIIKIM, MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILUAMV SLOCK, - - . AM1IKK8T. MASS. 

OMM llol'KH 

© to ia a. »*., i-ao to a jp. ia. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



."VI. A. <S. A«;'t, 



C K.WICIilt, >00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

" Thursday delivered Saturday. 

I^rSATISFAOTION OU A.RANTBED. t/^ 
U. A. VTLBT, manager. 

Office I 
East Fleasant Street. 



Your Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATCH MAKER 

ii Amity St., Amiikrst, Mass. 

Mainsprings, I year f , qq 

Cleaning, j ,'.<„, 

Prompt reliable work at Lowest Prices. 



The Children are Happy. 
Because ttieir clothe* an made on the Nkw IIomk Sewino 
Machine, which fact, asfures them of no -rips." Mothers 
should get one at once as It will do for their children In years 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 




DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



. „„ v r»««« L- H. ToURTELOTTE. 

Arthur e. dorr. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AND JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 




PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - • - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 



A. G. SPALDING 4 BROS. 



The Largest Manufacturers In the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 
Golf 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE, 



Telephone Connection, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Uniforms 
for all 
Athletic 
Sport* 



Official 
Implements 

for all 
Track and 
Field Sport* 

Scalding'* handsomely Illustrated catalogue of 

all "ports contains numerous .uggestlons 

Mailed free anywhere 



Gymnasium 
Apparatus 



A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. 



73 Federal St., 



Boston. 



J. H.TROTT 

PL0U1BEB. STEfiPl 4 60S FITTER. 

HID DEBLER IK STOVES BID RHNGES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL, 



THE AMHERST 

FORNITDRE and CARPET STORE 

A COMPLETE LINK OK GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MAR3H, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



K8TAKI.ISHED 1881. 



EIMER& AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NKW YORK. 

IMPOKTKKH ID MAMOFACTUEKK* (>> 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 



We handle the bent of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY". 



LET . . . 



LEW 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

GERARD. N. LEW. 

19 PLEASANT ST. REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKB, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOYVKER 6 CO. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



CAfcttNfft & A0WH0U«. 



i>wa$, 



ArtHftsr , Aa$$. 













I 



*t>»-< THE 

flfoassacbusetts 

Hgricultural 

Golleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFER: 



♦ 



1 SHORT COURSES as follows i 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairt Farming. Open to persons of both ^exes^ 
Appl cants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish !***ǣ* *ȣ 
character- No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bxe Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School ok Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
nth Tells. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
wftb the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for al persons 
desiring to unpLe the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agncul- 
ture and horticulture. 

9 * TOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
dmisstn granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Reqmred 
imes during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
' )Tth!L\or part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, Genera Horti- 

W J^^Ftetalta re , Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Vetenn- 
l TsclntTnto^ Physica, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modem Languages, 
C „. listry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed £ " ,er annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Buttered, Amherst, Ma... 



\ x i \ x- '■-■- 

,A.g] *w 1 1 u i 1 1 
College 



THE COLLEGE SIGN AL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 15 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 12. 1909 








We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of eoming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Uoth.ng, and m 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



page's SDoc Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VIOLIN, BANJO, MA0DOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 

thTlTrbe:r , s 

VARIETY STORE. 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 
best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 
branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 
THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 
I9 o Pearl St., - - Hartford, Conn. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bri^gyourPictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAfiE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS., MAY 12. 1909 



NO. 15 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural Collere 
Student, and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication, .hould be addreued Coixsot Sia»* L »-..«.« t * 

sen, InUta*. until IU discontinue i. ordered and arrear, are paid. SubtLrVwho £ t ™ir T.^~™ J?" ^^ 2 * 
notify the Businesa Manager. ° °° n01 reo » lYe ">•'' P*per regularly are requested to 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. EdItor-ln-Chlsf. 
E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager. 
u ».,»« . „ EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911. AuKtant Business Manager 

HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. Acting Editor-in-Editor. LOUIS C BROWN iQift 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM, 19.0, Alumni Note.. PARK W !i I ™ .1m ' 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. |f||, College Note.. HERBERT £ BLANEy' 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. Circulation Department. 
ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation Department 



Athletic Notes. 
Department Note*. 
1911, Special. 



T.rme, f i.oo per .ear 1, sdssscs. S4a a l, Copj— , toe Pofge „,«,,«, «, Vmib ^ ^^^ ^ 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Base- Ball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



Csnsds, sac. extra 



L. 



H. W. Turner, Pre.. 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 
R. H. Allen, Manager. 
E. J. Burke. Manager. 
R. S. Eddy, Manager. 
Schermerhorn, Manager. 



College Senate, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index 

Y. M. C A. 

Musical Association. 

Tennl. Association, 



Entered a. second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst 



O. C. Bartlett, President. 
R. C. Llndblad. Pres. 
H. W. Blaney. Manager. 
F. T. Haynes. Prea. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 
F. L. Thomas. Manager. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



The business manager wishes to call the attention 
of those alumni who have not as yet paid their Signal 
subscriptions. The end of the college year is but a 
few weeks off and he wishes to close his accounts in 
June with all bills paid. 



Amherst has again come off the field a winner In 
our annual baseball game. The figures of Saturday's 
game show, however, that the luckiest team wins. 
Both teams played great baseball with the honors In 
our favor, but unsteadiness at critical moments, with 
^e inability to bat at opportune times lost the game 
for us. 



team this year, and with the spirit of M. A. C. 
instilled into it. the remainder of the season looks 
most bright for the outcome. 



Our recent victory over Williams in baseball went 
a long ways in removing the stings of defeat which 
we have so often felt at her hands. For the first 
time in our history we have defeated her in baseball, 
a nd may it not be our last. We have got a speedy 



The support of the Signal comes a great deal from 
alumni subscriptions. Therefore It Is proper that the 
column headed "Alumni" should be of great Import- 
ance, and it is the desire of the Signal to do this. 
The alumni editor has sent letters to all of the class 
secretaries asking them to keep him In touch with the 
alumni, and they are doing so In a very satisfactory 
manner. To better the scheme still further It is 
necessary that each alumnus send In all the news 
possible regarding either himself or other alumni. In 
doing this the Signal not alone will receive the benefit 
but it will tend to bring the alumni and undergradu- 
ates nearer together, and also the alumni in closer 
touch with one another. 



Rowdyism, that untamed animal spirit, still makes 
itself manifest in the class-room and on the campus 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




l.l 









■>5 



t m. A. C. The recent disappearance of the 
1910 Class Tree, probably a so-called joke, by a few 
fun-loving men, is a good example of this spirit. It 
is difficult to make some people see where fun stops 
and this state of affairs begins. Such actions belong 
to grammar school children. And still further: why 
is it that the men. when playing ball on the campus, 
lose control of themselves and rip off the words of 
questionable character with their voices raised to a 
high pitch? Watch out, men, and have a care for 
what you say and where you say it. This college is 
trying to raise its standard in scholarship and athletics, 
and it is doing so very rapidly. Each one of us must 
let the townspeople and whomever knows of the col- 
lege see that we can be gentlemen at all times. It 
is up to every man In college to make himself and 
his associates good representatives of M. A. C. 



THE WILLIAMS VICTORY. 

Lack of space and shortness of time prevented the 
appearance of more than a bare outline of the game 
in our previous issue. 

The game was the first victory we have ever scored 
over Williams in baseball. We outplayed them in 
every department except on the paths. With a little 
faster work there our score would have been even 

larger. 

The big feature of the game was Hubbard's pitch- 
ing. Only two hits were gathered off his delivery by 
Williams, and they were not in the same inning. He 
struck out nine men, one of whom was Wadsworth, 
the best batter Williams ever had. The high cold 
wind made pitching difficult on both sides. Williams 
used two twirlers. Savage retiring after the fifth ses- 
sion, during which five runs came over the plate. 
He 'made an ascension when a series of bunts came 
his way. Davis succeeded him. and prevented further 
scoring. Williams made its runs in the fifth, seventh, 
and ninth innings, mostly on its ability to annex the 
bags after the first one was reached. The fielding of 
both teams was good, considering the weather. 
Tufts, 5; M. A, C, 4. 
The second Tufts game was played in Medford 
April 28, and was lost by one run. A very close 



decision at the plate in the ninth, declaring Warner 
out when he appeared perfectly safe prevented our 
tying the game in that inning. 

The hitting on our side was strong, but the fielding 
was weak, and this accounts for the defeat. Eight 
hits would win any game, with only one half that num- 
ber on the other side. Five errors against one would 
lose most games, especially if the stolen bases were 
In the ratio of three to ten. 

Tufts started the scoring in the second, getting two 
on singles by Clifford and Knight, two stolen bases, 
and an error by French. In the next inning we tied 
the score on three hits, a wild pitch, and a passed 
ball In the fourth session, Tufts got two runs across 
in the same way that they got them in the second, 
except that Priest and Hall made the hits. The fifth 
inning saw the score tied again, this time on two hits 
mixed up with a pass. The winning run came 
unearned in the seventh on two errors and a walk to 

first. „ .. . 

Warner, O 'Grady and Tilton did practically all of 

our hitting. Hubbard getting the only other safe one. 
Both first basemen played perfect ball, and lots of it. 
The score : — 



Dustin. 9. 
Hooper, r. f., 
Priest, c. f., 
Clifford, c, 
Knight, 1 b., 
Hal" 1 f. P-. 
McKenna, 2 b.. 
Qualters. 3 b., 
Atwood, p. 1 '•. 

Total. 



Warner, r. f., 
O'Grady. c. f., 
Hubbard. 1 b , 
Thayer. I. f., 
Hosmer, 1. f., 
Ackerman, s.. 
Tilton, 2 b., 
Smith. 2 b., 
French, c, 
Williams, p., 



tupts. 












A.B. 


R. 


Is. 


P.O. 


A. 


B 


3 








4 


2 





3 


n 














4 
4 


i 
i 


I 
1 


2 
3 


1 
3 






4 


? 


1 


15 





u 


3 





1 


1 


4 





3 


i 





2 


4 


1 


3 











1 





3 











1 






30 

M. A. C. 
A.B. 
3 

5 

5 

1 

1 

3 

4 

4 

4 

4 



27 16 



1 
I 
1 
1 










IB. 

3 
2 
1 




2 






P.O. 

I 
3 
13 
2 


I 
1 
3 




A. 






4 
4 
3 
1 




B. 





I 



1 
I 


2 




Total 34 4 8 24 18 5 

Sacrifice hit-Dustin. S»ol f n b^s-Tufts 10. M. A O 3. JaseJ 

balls-off Williams 1, o f - Mj^wUj, "ftcMSood. Struck out-by 

3K. !^JVIS^H^^ Afford. Umpire-Heno- 

Time— 2 hours. 

Williams 1912, 4; M. A. C. 1912, 0. 
The Williams freshmen played the finest kind of 
baseball Wednesday afternoon at Williamstown, and 
defeated the freshmen of the Massachusetts Agricul- 



tural College, 4 to 0, The Williams boys used two 
pitchers, Ayres and Davis, and both were in fine form, 
Ayres allowing but three hits in six Innings, and Davis 
one in three innings, Williams was in the box for the 
visitors, and kept his total down to a like number. 
The fielding of the Williams freshmen was fast and 
clean, and included two double plays and a one- 
handed catch in the outfield by Shons. The Wil- 
liams freshmen made their runs from two hits and an 
error in the third, and a single and a triple and two 
errors in the sixth. 

Only three of our men reached second, and none 
got to third. Smith and Ackerman did all of our hit- 
ting, two each. The latter stole twice, and pitcher 
Williams once. Our fielding was ragged at times, 
McGarr leading with two errors. 

The score: — 



Trumbull. I, 
Conger, I., 
Davies, I., 
Wallaces- 
Shores, m., 
Ayres, p., 
Davis, p.. 
Under, c. 
O'Brien, 2, 
Field, 3, 
Anderson, r., 

Total, 



Tilton. 3. 
Smith, 2, 
Ackerman, s. 
Williams, p., 
McGarr. I. 
Covill. r.. 
Muller, 1, 
Peckham. c. 
Curran, m., 



WILLIAMS 1912. 



4 
2 
2 
4 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 



P.O. A. 



2 




I 



1 






8 


6 
3 
I 
I 

5 

2 
1 






2 

2 

3 
2 

1 



30 


4 


27 


10 


1 


M. A. c. 1912. 










A.B. 


H. 


P.O. 


A. 


«• 


4 














4 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


2 





1 


3 





1 


3 





3 





9 





2 


3 














3 





2 








3 





7 


2 





2 





2 









Total. 28 2 24 7 4 

Innings. 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 

Williams, 2 2 0—4 

Runs— Trumbull. Shores. O'Brien, Field. Total bases— Williams 5, M. 
A. C. 4. Stolen bases— Ackerman 2, Williams. Two-base hit— Trumbull 
J-eft on bases— Williams 2. M. A. C. 2. Struck out— by Ayres 3. by Davis 
2, by Williams 7. Batter hit— Curran. Double plays— Anderson and Wal- 
lace, Ayres and Trumbull. Time— 1 hour, 40 minute*. Umpire— Prindle. 

Amherst, 2 ; M, A. C, I. 
The uncertainty of baseball was clearly demon- 
strated in our game last Saturday on Pratt Field with 
Amherst. The statistics of the game show that, as 
a whole, our players excelled theirs, but the incidents 
of the game combined in ways favorable to them and 
unfavorably to us. For Instance, neither of Am- 
herst's runs came in the same inning with a hit. 
They resulted from errors, a steal, a base on balls, 



sacrifices, etc. Fortune, aided by one hit at an op- 
tune time, allowed us only one run, although our hits 
were twice as numerous as Amherst's — two were for 
extra bases— our errors fewer, Hubbard's strike-outs 
three times McClure's, and his passes the same. 
Eight of our men were left on bases, and seven Am- 
herst men. The three double plays executed by the 
home team pulled them out of numerous difficulties. 
They played with confidence, while some of our fresh- 
man players were very nervous. Several of our 
players were also in poor shape physically. Tilton 
had his right hand injured last week, Smith had a 
strained ankle, and Thayer's arm was not in good 
condition. 

Excellent pitching on both sides, but with Hubbard 
easily superior, and erratic fielding, was the rule. 
Our outfield work was excellent. Smith and Tilton 
had only three chances in the field between them. A 
curious feature of the game was the relatively small 
number of assists our players made. 

The game went as follows: Warner drove a sharp 
grounder to McClure, who tossed him out at first, 
Thayer lined one over third, but Washburn reached 
it. Ackerman rolled one to the same man, and did 
not reach first. For Amherst, McClure rolled one at 
Ackerman, was safe on his fumble, and stole second. 
Pennock raised a high one, which our shortstop 
dropped. Kane sacrificed, Hubbard to Covill. 
Henry grounded out, Ackerman to first, but McClure 
came home with the first run. Washburn struck out. 
Score : Amherst 1, M. A. C. 0. 

Hubbard hit for two bases over Taylor's head. 
O'Grady sent a grounder to Kane, who threw to third 
too low to catch Hubbard. O'Grady stole second. 
Pennock threw out Tilton, and Smith walked. With 
the bases full French drove a short fly to left, which 
Jube caught and whipped to Kane at second, catch- 
ing O'Grady off the bag. Jube filed out to Thayer. 
Vernon fanned, but Taylor got on by being hit In the 
ankle. Burt, however, could hit nothing past Hub- 
bard, and died at first. 

Covill could not find McClure and fanned. Warner 
pushed one toward Washburn, and did not beat it to 
first. Thayer, after driving a long foul to left, struck 
out. Covill intercepted McClure's fast bounder and 
reached the bag before the runner did. Pennock and 
Kane succumbed to Hubbard's benders. 



176 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






'77 



Fourth Inning : Ackerman foul filed to Wash- 
burn. Hubbard sent a long fly to right center, which 
Jube reached but dropped. Pennock started a double 
play when he tossed O" Grady's grounder to Kane at 
second, who threw the ball to Burt In time to get 
O'Grady. Henry received the benefit of Hubbard's 
only base on balls. Washburn advanced Henry and 
reached first himself when Ackerman fumbled his 
easy roller. Jube sacrificed, but his bunt was fumbled 
just long enough by Hubbard to enable him to beat it 
to first. With the bases full, French had a passed 
bali, and Henry ambled home. Vernon again struck 
out.' Taylor drove a sharp grounder to Ackerman, 
who picked It up cleanly and threw home Instead of 
to first. Washburn made no real attempt to score, 
so the bases were again full with only one down. 
Burt's fly was taken by Warner, who held the runners 
on their bags. Thayer retired McClure. Score, 2-0. 
The first of the fifth was practically a repetition of 
the first of the fourth. The double play that retired 
our side was Identical with the one in that Inning. 
Tilton was out, McClure to Burt. Smith rapped one 
at Pennock, who fumbled It slightly. Smith slid to 
the bag and hurt his bad ankle In doing so. Piper 
ran for him. French gave Pennock, Kane and Burt 
the chance to work their combination play, and they 
took advantage of the opportunity. Pennock fanned 
at three fast ones, and Warner nailed Kane's difficult 
foul fly. Tilton then accepted his onlv chance of the 
game on Henry's high one. 

' The sixth session was opened by Covlll's second 
strike-out. Warner hit a sharp grounder through 
the pitcher's box. but was caught stealing, Henry to 
Kane. Thayer got a line hit to center to his credit 
at this point. Ackerman was retired by Pennock 
and Burt. Washburn popped out to Ackerman. Jube 
scratched a slow hit to short, and he went to third on 
Vernon's hit to left, although Vernon himself made 
only one base on it. He stole second a moment 
later, however. Hubbard let himself out a trifle and 
struck out Taylor and Burt. 

Seventh inning: By lively sprinting into short 
right field Kane was able to get Hubbard's Texas 
leaguer. O'Grady grounded to Washburn. Then, 
with two down, one run came in on a hit and two 
errors mixed in, a peculiar series of plays. Tilton 
reached first on Washburn's fumble of his grounder. | 



Then Smith hit safely to center, and Tilton, after 
rounding second, sprinted for third. Jube's throw 
hit him in the shoulder and rolled away, while he kept 
on to the plate, Smith remaining at second. McClure 
tossed out French. McClure hit over second base, 
but was caught trying to steal, Hubbard to Covlll to 
Smith. Pennock grounded to Smith, and Kane 
again struck out. Score, 2-1 In favor of Amherst. 

Eighth inning: Covlll raised a short fly that Jube 
just reached. Warner made his second hit, a dou- 
ble, over Vernon's head. Washburn retired Thayer 
on a fly. Ackerman walked, and Hubbard was safe 
on Pennock's second error. With the bases full, 
O'Grady hit to McClure, and was out on a close de- 
cision. Henry and Washburn were deceived by 
Hubbard's change of pace, and could only roll easy 
ones to him. The second one pulled him off his bal 
ance, but he got his man. Jube gave Thayer a fly, 
close to the foul line. 

The ninth opened like a rally, but the run needed 
to tie the score did not materialize. Tilton hit to 
center, and Smith sacrificed him along. French 
could not get him home, being thrown out by Mc- 
Clure. Williams, batting for Covlll, gave Pennock 
a hard chance, which he accepted. 
The score; 



AMHERST. 



R. IB. 



McClure. p.. 
Pennock, s., 
Kane. 2 b., 
Henry, c, 
Washburn, 3 b.. 
lube, c.f., 
Vernon, l.f., 
Taylor, r.f.. 
Burt, 1 b.. 

Total, 



Warner. IX. 
Thayer, r.f., 
Ackerman. s., 
Hubbard, p., 
O'Grady, c.f., 
Tilton, 3 b.. 
Smith, 2 b.. 
French, c. 
Covili, 1 b., 
Williams*. 



4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 



1 




1 









1 






I 
I 






P.O. 



5 
3 
3 
I 
1 


14 



6 
S 
2 
1 
3 

1 







2 
I 



I 

2 
I 






29 



M. A. C. 



IB. 



27 



P.O. 



18 



4 





2 


2 








4 





1 


3 








a 








I 


1 


4 


4 





1 





s 


I 


4 

















4 


1 


1 


1 








? 





1 


I 


1 





4 

















I 








7 


I 





1 














u 



Total, 
Score Amherst 



33 



1 



24 



8 



2. M. A. C 



1. Sacrifice hits— Smith. Kane. Jube. 



McClure, -i. oy nuuMiu. ». ••■• ~-r i - — --_■ 

piays-Vernon to Kane. Pennock to Kane to Burt 
Umpire-Foley. Tlme-2 hours. 
latted for Covili in ninth. 



The following schedule of events for the interclass 
track meet next Thursday at Pratt Field has been 
announced. The figure following each event is the 
number of men allowed from each class. 



100 yard dash 
440 yard dash 
880 yard run 
220 yard dash 
Mile run 

Running high jump 
Shot put 16 lbs. 
Pole vault 
Throwing discus 
Running broad jump 
Throwing 16 lb. hammer 
Relay race 1-4 mile each 



4 men 
4 men 
4 men 

4 men 
8 men 

5 men 
5 men 
5 men 
5 men 
5 men 
5 men 
4 men 



The points won by each class in this meet will be 
added to those already won in the cross country run 
last November, and in the meet last January, and 
the class having the greatest total of points will hold 
the cup the following year, and the numerals of the 
class will be engraved on it. 

The present standing of the class in order is : Jun- 
iors, 68; Seniors, 36; Freshmen, 28; Sopho- 
mores, 7. 

Firsts will probably count five, seconds three and 
thirds one. Silver medals will be awarded winners, 
bronze to the second men. The members of the 
winning relay team get silver medals. 



Collet flot« 



The Y. M. C. A. of May 4, was led by Mr. Mer- 
chant of Amherst College. "Our Appreciation of 
God" was his subject. 

The Class of 1909 celebrated the anniversary of 
the planting of their class tree, during the evening of 
May 4. Loyalty to their class and goodfellowship 
spirit was renewed. 

Dr. A. E. Winship of Boston, editor of the Educa- 
tionalJournal, addressed the assembly of Wednesday, 
April 28, on "Personality." Dr. Winship is a man 
with an attracting personality of his own , and his talk 
was very Interesting. 



The trustees of the college have granted to Pro- 
fessor Hasbrouck a year's leave of absence, begin- 
ning with September, 1909. He expects to spend 
the time in research work at the Sloane Physical 
Laboratory, Yale University. 

President and Mrs. Kenyon L. Butterfield have 
commenced their annual custom of inviting members 
of the senior class to dinner at their residence on 
Lincoln Avenue. They plan to entertain the entire 
class in small groups at a time. 

An event, which should prove of much Interest to 
the student body, will be the class sings during com- 
mencement week, on Monday evening, June 21. 
All arrangements for these sings have not yet been 
made but each class will be called upon to give its 
particular song, with one or two other selections. 
Some suitable prize will probably be offered for the 
class doing the best work. 

Northfield spirit ran high at the Y. M. C. A. 
meeting of April 29. It took the form of a stereop- 
tican lecture, being under the charge of Mr. Worman, 
Yale '08, collegiate secretary for Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island. Great attempts are being made In all 
the eastern colleges to send large delegations of stu- 
dents to the Northfield Conference In July, and sev- 
eral at this meeting signified their intention of going. 
The plans for the future development of the 
grounds of the Massachusetts Agricultural College as 
submitted by Mr. Warren H. Manning of Boston, 
will be placed on exhibition In Wilder Hall, May 
24. A public meeting, at which Mr. Manning will 
be present, will be held on the evening of May 28. 
The public is invited to inspect the plans while on 
exhibition, and to be present at the hearing. 

The assembly of May 5 was addressed by J. 
Horace McFarland of Harrisburg, Pa. His subject 
was "The Common Sense of Conservation." Mr. 
McFarland Is president of the American Civics Asso- 
ciation and is a speaker thoroughly equipped as 
regards his subject. On Thursday evening he gave 
a lecture before the Stockbridge Club In French 
Hall, on "The Crusade Against Ugliness." His 
talk was well illustrated by lantern views. Much 
interest was aroused around the college for Mr. 
McFarland 's work which is rapidly gaining the atten- 
tion of the entire country, 



■ 7 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'79 







CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

May 13— Interclass track meet, 9-00 a. m. on Pratt 
Field. 
U. S. Inspection, 2-00 p. m. 
Y. M. C. A., 6-45 P. m., in Chapel, Mr. 

Purrlngton of Florence. 
Debating Club, 7-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
!5_Hlgh School Day. 
16— Professor Hart's Bible Class. 12-30 P. m. 

in Chapel. 
18— Rehearsal, Junior Play 7-00 p. m. 
Stockbridge Club. 7-00 p. m. 

19 Assembly. 1-15 p. m.. in Chapel. 

Debating Club, 7-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
2i_Rehearsal, Junior Play, 7-00 p. m. 
22— Professor Hart's Bible Class, 12-30 p. m. 

In Chapel. 
23— Assembly, 1-15 p. m., in Chapel. 

Baseball— M. A. C. vs. Springfield Train- 
ing School on Campus. 



Carpenter, Jr.. R. K. Clapp. W. G. Deming, J. T. 
Finnegan.J. M. He.ald, F. B. Hills, j. A. Harlow. 
Q S Lowry, D. C. Maxon, M. C. Pratt, E. J. 
Robinson. G. A. Tllton, R. W. Wales, H. C. 

Walker; J. C. Bebe,ex-'09. R. D. Lull. ex'-09, H. 

M. Jennlson '08, W. S. Regan '08, E. C. Fowler. 

K. B. Hazen. 



INFORMAL 

The Informal held Saturday, May 1 , was one of 
the most successful of such affairs held this year. 
The heavy rain and consequent cancellation of the 
ball game seemed not to dampen the interest of the 
sixty odd couples who attended. 

The Drill Hall was decorated as usual with bunting 
and potted plants. The music was furnished by 
Derrick's Westfleld Orchestra. 

The patronesses were :— Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck, 

Mrs. J. E. Ostrander, of the College, Miss Eton of 

Mt Holyoke, and Mrs. Orcutt of Smith. 

Those who attended were :-1909. W. D. Barlow. 

G. M. Codding, P. P. Cardin, S. S. Crossman, R. 

C. Llndblad. H. G. Noble, H. D. Phelps, R. C. 

Potter, C. R. Webb; 1910— R. H. Allen, J. C. 

Bailey, L. Brandt, H. A. Brooks, L. C. Brown, R. 

P. Armstrong, W. A. Cloues, H. T. Cowles. L. S. 

Dickinson, R. S. Eddy, H. R. Francis, J. N. Ever- 

son, F. T. Haynes, M. S. Hazen, W. E. Leonard, 

A. F. Rockwood, F. L. Thomas, W. M. S. Titus, 

E. H. Turner. R. A. Waldron ; 1911— J. E. Dudley, 

N. H. Hill, L. M. Johnson, E. A. Larrabee, F. D. 

McGraw, F. A. McLaughlin, G. P. Nickerson, F. A. 

Prouty, R. L.Whitney; 1912— W. J. Birdsall, J. 



FRESHMAN BANQUET. 

Friday evening, April 23. the freshman class held 
a successful banquet at the American House, Boston. 
No difficulty was encountered in leaving town and 
everything went off smoothly from start to finish. 
The class was carried In a freight car from Clark 
Hall direct to the Boston and Maine station in time 
to take the 3 19 train on which a special car had 
been provided. On arriving at Boston they were met 
by the officers who had been spending the previous 
week out of town. The banquet began at 8- 15 with 
seventy-one members of the class at the table. 

After the articles on an excellent menu had been 
disposed of, E. I. Shaw assumed the duties of toast- 
master and the following toasts were responded to, 
each speaker in his turn being heartily cheered: 
1912 Who? Moreau 

Class Spirit. Philbrick 

Faculty, f« 

Smoke Rings. Castle 

The Fussers of 1912, Finnegan 

Our Alma Mater. Parker 

Following the regular speakers on the program, the 
college song was sung and a number of members of 
the class were called upon for impromptu speeches. 
Among their number were. Caldwell, Covill, Walker, 
Birdsall, Gibson, Southwick, Gray. Cohen and Gold- 
berg one of the former members of the class. The 
banquet broke up at 12 o'clock, the majority of the 
class staying in Boston over night, although a large 
number who live in the vicinity were able to spend 
Saturday and Sunday at their homes. 

The banquet committee consisted of W. J. Bird- 
sail, H. C. Walker, and J. W. Covill. while H. C 
Walker, T. J. Moreau, C. Peckham, and R. W. 
Wales constituted a committee on attendance. 



Amherst has decided to build an athletic field for 
football alone. Work will begin as soon as the nec- 
essary funds are obtained. 



AS RECOMMENDED BY THE HOUSE COM 
MITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS. 

On the first of May word was received here that the 
House Committee on Ways and Means had made 
their recommendations on the college budget. The 
recommendations were disappointing from the stand- 
point that they did not cover some of the items which 
we have recognized of first importance. We hope 
to publish, very soon, a statement of the appropriation 
and the plans for its use. 



New equipment. 

Repairs and minor improvemenis, 

Land. 

Buildings: 
Laboratory for entomology. 
Farm house, 
Fruit storage house, 
Buildings for poultry department, 
Stock judging pavilion. 
Dwelling house for head of divi- 
sion of horticulture 



Asked. 


Recommended. 


$13 605 


$10 000 


40 000 


33 000 


15 000 


5 500 


80 000 


80 000 


2 500 




3 000 




3 000 




8 000 




6 000 





Total. 



$171 105 



$128 500 



Not recommended by committee on agriculture. 



INCREASE IN CURRENT INCOME. 

Present Proposed Recommended Increase 



Object 

Scholarships, $15 000 $15 000 $15 000 

Instruction. 30 000 43 000 37 000 

Maintenance, 8 000 20 000 15 000 

Graduate school, 5 000 2 500 

Normal department. 5 000 6 000 5 000 

Short courses, 5 000 10 000 7 500 

Agricultural survey. 4 000 

Student labor. 5 000 7 500 7 500 

Veterinary Laboratory, 1 000 1 000 1 000 

Agricultural exp. sta. 10 000 10 500 10 500 

Feed stuffs. 3 000 3 000 3 000 

Total. 



$7 500 
7 000 
2 300 



2 500 



2 500 



$82 500 $125 000 $104 500 $22 000 



SOME "MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES" WHOM 
I KNOW. 

[To be Continued.'] 

VIM. Samuel Clarence Thompson, B. Sc, the 
first alumnus to be elected a director of the Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers, was born in Roxbury 
in 1851 ; attended Dearborn and Washington Schools; 
in 1860 moved to Southbcro and was graduated from 
Peters High School, 1868; entered college with class 
of 72 ; an intimate participant of the famous interview 



of 71 and 72 near the old Amherst House before 
noted in these sketches and on memory and belief 
alleges that the cane stayed with 72 ; the conflicting 
allegations, the writer already has In relation to this 
historical affair, are made by men known to me. to 
be absolutely honest and am hoping to get more state- 
ments; Mr. Thompson was also "mixed up" with a 
cane affair in the old botanical recitation room on the 
hill; In the struggle between 71 and 72, the cane, 
still In the hands of a 72 man and partly broken was 
abruptly seized by one Henry Goodell, now among 
the immortal dead; Mr. Thompson taught district 
school at Ashland the winter of 1869-70; lieutenant 
Co. B Corps Cadets ; valedictorian; Phi Kappa Phi. 
Engaged In engineering, Boston Water Works, 1872- 
79; private work 1880; Principal Assistant Engineer 
South Florida Railroad, Acting Chief, Acting Super- 
intendent, and Acting Roadmaster 1880-81; Rail- 
road Surveys 1881 in Pennsylvania, and part of 
1881 to 1883 in City Engineer's Office. Lowell, 
Mass., on Water Works and Bridges; Assistant En- 
gineer Department of Public Parks, New York City, 
on construction of Streets and Sewers, 1883-91; 
Engineer under Commissioner of Street Improve- 
ments. 23d and 24th Wards, engaged in Constrnc- 
tlon of Streets, Pavements, etc., 1891 98; to date 
Principal Assistant Engineer, Department of High- 
ways, Bronx Borough. Member American Society 
of Civil Engineers since 1889. Charter member 
Municipal Engineers' Society (New York) and Its 
President 1905; member of Graduates Club of New 
York City and for three years on its Committe on 
Admissions ; member also Masonic and other orders ; 
for years President of a Gun Club and annually takes 
vacation in the wilds of Virginia; initiated as a gradu- 
ate member of Phi Sigma Kappa, 1895; has been 
Treasurer and vice- President of the Executive Coun- 
cil and later Recorder and now Chancellor of the 
Supreme Court of the same ; a loyal and patient 
friend he is respected by his professional associates 
and beloved by many fraternity men of other institu- 
tions than M. A. C. Author; prize essay, transac- 
tions Hampshire Agricultural Society, 1871 on East- 
ern versus Western Farming; also prize essay, Road 
Construction and Maintenance, Engineering Record, 
1892; delivered annual address as president of 
Muncipal Engineers Society, 1905 ; same being a 



I 







i8o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



181 



review of engineering projected in and about New 
York City. A small but pertinent item of pedagogical 
interest is the visit of Mr. Thompson when an under- 
graduate to President Clark with the request that as 
he was fitting for life work as a civil engineer, he 
forego further study in the course in chemistry ; in 
those days as in mine, all followed a prescribed 
course of study ; President Clark, and who of us who 
were under him, will forget him, sympathized with 
the petitioner's position, but advised him to take all 
the work ; President Goodell in after years used to 
recall with the greatest delight that Mr. Thompson 
followed the President's advice and some years after 
graduation while on some engineering work, solved a 

problem in geology which his chief, a graduate of , 

could not ; another credit to the system then in force 
and to Dr. Goessmann's teaching. Married, 1875, 
Miss Alice Louisa Fairchild— children : a son, Louis, 
a graduate of West Virginia University and now en- 
gaged In civil engineering in New York, and one 
daughter; the son married and there is a grandson. 
President M. A. C. Club of New York, 1888. Pro- 
fessional address : Borough Hall, 177th Street and 
Third Avenue ; home address, 810 East 173rd, New 
York. 



the College Signal, that no reprisals will be taken on 
me through its columns; so watch out); with this 
digression we will proceed with "Sam Holman's" 
interesting and successful career; leader of College 
Quartette; member college orchestra, Rifle Asso- 
ciation and Washington Irving Literary Society; 
captain of '83 baseball nine, junior director of 
Football Association; honorary member Q. T. V. 
Studied medicine at Harvard, 1883-84; in business 
in Attleboro since that date; married, 1886, Miss 
Virtue E. Swift; five children, three of whom are liv- 
ing. Member school committee tor three years; 
collector of taxes for twelve years ; Member of the 
Massachusetts House of Representatives since and in- 
cluding 1907 ; chairman Harbor and Public Lands 
Committee since and including 1908; commodore 
Edgewood Yacht Club, Providence. 1908; treasurer 
Photographers' Association of New England for seven 
years ; past Grand Chancellor Knights of Pythias of 
Massachusetts and colone' in the uniform rank, Mas- 
sachusetts Brigade of same; ex-president Co. C. 
Republican Club of Attleboro; I. O. O. F. ; R. A. ; 
V. 0. P. F. ; large real estate owner. Address, 

Attleboro, Mass. 

Dr. John A. Cutter. '82. 



IX. Samuel Morey Holman, B. Sc, was born 
at Norton In 1862; studied at More and Gaff and 
Bryant and Stratton business colleges, Providence ; 
entered college with class of '83 and unfortunately 
his good mother, whom I had known, came with him 
for a few days and hoped the sophomores would not 
try to haze him , because of his great strength ; 1 was 
a sophomore and my solemn class obligations im- 
pelled me to report this coversatlon to '82 's class 
captain — we need not go into any details as to what 
subsequently transpired; (I wish to make it clear now 
that those desultory sketches, written in odd moments, 
I am fully responsible for; my own college course 
was somewhat marked by my very evident youth and 
considerable sickness ; the usual honors of class posi- 
tion went to the older and mightier ; have gotten over 
my youth and now weigh about 1 60 ; In the course of 
time I am going to reach some of my own class and 
also other men of my time In other classes and they 
may find out that "little Johnnie Cutter" is a thing of 
of the past; lam assured by the powers that be In 



Dfp&ftm^rvf ^lo-t?s. 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 
New Barns. 

Plans and specifications for the new barns have 
been published and bids for the construction of the 
same have been asked for Monday, May 10th. The 
plans show a storage barn a little more than half as 
large as the old one on the same site. This barn will 
furnish hay and grain storage for the present cow- 
stable and will connect it with the cement silos. The 
ridge pole will run north and south. 

The other barn , to be known as the young stock 
barn, is planned with a simple rectangular storage 
barn with the floor run across the shortest dimension. 
From this a one story wing runs at right angles to- 
ward the south and furnishes stable room and loose 
boxes for young stock. A separate wing will give 
four pens opening to the south for bull pens, with in- 



dividual yards attached. This barn will be placed to 
the west of the present barn and at least 150 feet 
from any other building. 

It is hoped that at least part of the hay storage will 
be ready for this year's crops. The plans for the 
tool shed and machinery storage have not yet been 
completed. 

The Department of Pomology has set out a dwarf 
orchard South of Wilder Hall to take the place of the 
one which was removed from the site of French Hall. 
The fruits represented are apples, pears, peaches, 
nectarines, medlars and currants, and the trees are 
largely specially trained from such as upright cordons 
and horizontal cordons, both one and two arms. The 
trees were imported from France and England and the 
orchard is designed as a model for a suburban place 
and is especially for the use of students electing work 
in pomology. 

On April 30, Professor Sears lectured, before the 
Y. M. C. A. in West Newbury where a special ef- 
fort is being made by this organization to awaken an 
interest in modern methods of farming. A slight be- 
ginning has already been made there along the 
lines of orchard demonstration work and it is expected 
that this work will be extended another year. 

The promise at present is for a large crop of 
peaches in the college orchards. Young trees in 
particular are full of blossom buds but even the oldest 
trees in Clark Orchard now fourteen years old, 
promise to bear all the fruit they can well carry. 

Professor Sears lectured in Lynn on Thursday eve- 
ning before the Houghton Horticultural Society on 
"The Outlook for Orcharding in New England." 

Owing to the small number of applicants the bee 
course will not be given this year. It is hoped that 
before another year this course may be correlated 
with other short courses. 

H. D. Haskins has designed and had constructed 
an apparatus to be used in the determination of 
Phosphates. In a box on the top of the machine 
are set horizontally a series of wheels whose axles, 
which run down through the bottom of the box, are 
attached to bent glass stirring rods. By power 
obtained from a hot-air engine and transmitted by a 
belt, the rods are made to revolve. Outside the box, 



and in front of each wheel, is a burette set to allow 
the reagents to drip into the beakers in which the 
stirring rods work. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh who has been ill, was again 
able to meet his classes Monday. 

Boston, May 5, 1909. 
President Kknyon L. Butterfield, 

Amherst, Mass. 
Dear Sir : — 

I am glad to tell you that Frank W. Stearns, Esq., 
of the firm of R. H. Stearns & Co. of this city, has 
notified me that he will give this year $100. to the 
Military Department of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, as a prize or prizes to students for ex- 
cellence in that department. The details of the 
award or awards are to be determined by the presi- 
dent of the college in consultation with the Military 
Commandant. The gift is to be in the name of Mrs. 
Emily Wllliston Stearns, (wife of the donor) in honor 
of her father, William S. Clark, LL. D., for so many 
years the esteemed president of the college. 
Yours truly, 
(Signed) M. F, Dickinson. 



Alu 



mm. 



NOTICE. 
The invitations are out for the Sophomore 
Senior Promenade to be held on June 23. Apply 
to L. 0. Stevenson, 191 1. Don't fail to be here 
for the Prom. 

The Athletic Committee requests members of the 
alumni who have In their possession any articles 
which would help complete the collection of trophies 
now being made here would send them in before 
June 15. These trophies are greatly appreciated 
and the committee is well pleased at the way the 
alumni have responded. Address H. W. Turner, 
Amherst. 

The reunion scheme has been adopted by '7 1 , '81. 
'38, '91, '92, '94, '08. All classes are urged to 
step quickly into line and help make the thing a suc- 
cess. Those planning for reunions at Commence- 
ment are 74, '76, '94, '99, '04, '06 and '08. 







l82 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



«8.3 






'78. Dr. A. A. Brigham, principal of the S. D. 

School of Agriculture, has been engaged to lecture at 
the Montana Farmers' Institutes during May and 
June. Under Dr. Brigham's direction, his school 
has had a very successful Initial year; there was an 
enrollment of over a hundred pupils. 

'83.— E. A. Bishop, for a number of years super- 
intendent of the Agricultural Department of the 
Hampton (Va.) Institute, who has been In the north 
for the past year for recuperation, has temporarily 
accepted the position of Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry in the R. I. College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts. 

•85.— Dr. W. E. Allen, who has been seriously 
ill during the months of January and February, has 
recently returned to Washington from an extended 
trip to the southern states and Porto Rico, much 
improved in health and able to take up his duties in 
connection with the office of Experiment Stations. 

'88.— Prof. F. S. Cooley writes that his work with 
the Montana Farmers' Institutes has been recognized 
by Increased appropriations for the next two years and 
that Gov. Norris thinks the Institutes among the 
most important fields of work. The Institutes have 
published a book on "Dry Land Farming," which is 
of great interest in that section. 

'91 .—A class history has been sent out. 
»97 _C. A, Peters, Berlin, W. 30, Eisenacher- 
strasse 103, Germany. In a letter to the University 
of Idaho Argonaut, he writes, "I am thoroughly 
enjoying the city and my university work." A com- 
ment which he makes is Interesting : "What would 
New York people say to docks made of green grass 
and stone ! Green grass running down to the water's 
edge to meet the cut stone that disappears beneath. 
That describes the North German Lloyd docks at 
Bremerhaven." 

Ex _>97._Maj. J. R. Eddy is in charge of the 
North Cheyenne Indian Reservation for the govern- 
ment, with his headquarters at Lame Deer, Mont. 
We hear that he is "looking as ruddy and vigorous as 
when he used to amuse the boys with the gloves at 
M. A. C." 

'99. (Short Course.)— W. A. Goodfield of Gil- 
bertville was fatally stabbed by a drunken Pole whom 



he had ejected from a Pomona Grange meeting at 
Hardwick, May 5. 

'00.— Born, in April, to Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Mor- 
rill of Orlando, Fla., a son. 

•02.— C. I. Lewis is part author of Bulletin 101, 
"Orchard Survey of Jackson County," issued by the 
Oregon Station. 

'03.— H. J. Franklin spent part of his vacation at 
M. A. C. and his home at Bernardston. 

'05.— E. G. Proulx, formerly of the Division of 
Fertilizers at the Massachusetts Station, is part 
author of the last bulletin issued by the Indiana 
Station. 

'04.— Remember the five-year reunion at 
Commencement. 

•04.— S. B. Haskell spoke at the Pomona Grange 
at Granby, May 5. 

•05,— ERRATUM— In the last issue of the Signal 
the address of F. A. Bartlett was given wrongly. It 
should have been Stamford. Conn., with H. L. 
Frost & Bartlett Company. At a meeting of the 
Employers' Association of Landscape Foresters and 
Commercial Entomologists in New York last month, 
he was elected Secretary and Treasurer. 

'05. The engagement of P. F. Williams and Miss 

Francis Kathrine Heard of Auburn, Ala., has been 
announced. The wedding will take place June 3 at 
Auburn. 



ADDRESSES OF THE CLASS OF N1NETEEN-FIVE. 

Adams, R. L., Spreckels Sugar Co., Spreckels, Cal. 
In charge of the Spreckels Experiment Station. 

Allen, G. H.. Munson-Whitaker Co., 1108 Flatiron 
Build.. New York, N. Y. 

Barnjs, H. L., Lakeview Farm, Stockbridge. 

Bartlett, F. A., with H. L. Frost & Co., Stamford, 
Conn. 

Crosby, H. D., Thompson, Conn. 

Cushman, Miss E. C, Teacher of Biology, Beverly 
High School, Beverly. 

Gardner. J. J., Assistant Horticulturist, Baron De 
Hirsh School, Woodbine, N. J. 

Gay, R. P., Forester, 44 Mariners Place. Plain- 
field, N. J. 

Hatch, W. B., Torrington, Conn. 

Holcomb, C. S., 39 St. Botolph St., Boston. 



Hunt, T. F., Riverside, Cal., Pathalogical Investi- 
gations in connection with the University of 

California. 
Ingham, N. D., in charge of Forestry Station, Santa 

Monica, Cal. 
Kelton, J. R., Instructor in Biology, Amsterdam 

High School, Amsterdam, N.Y., P. O.Box 136. 
Ladd, E. T., Chemist with the Baugh Chemical and 

Fertilizer Manufacturing Co., Baltimore. Md. 
Lewis, C. W., Melrose Highlands, with the Mass. 

Gypsy Moth Commission. 
Lyman, J. F., 706 Yale Station, New Haven, Conn., 

Graduate Student. 
Munson, W. A., Foxboro. 

Newhall, E. W.,1 14 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Sears, Wm. M., 9 Helen St., Dorchester. 
Swain, A. N., Merlin St., Dorchester. Forester. 
Taft, Mrs. W. O., Brook Farm, Northfield, Vt., 

R. F. D. No. 4. 
Taylor, A. D., with Warren H. Manning. Landscape 

Designer, 1101 Tremont Build., Boston. 
Tompson, H. F., Instructor in Vegetable Gardening, 

M. A. C, Amherst. 
Tupper, Bertram, Superintendent Wauwinit Farm, 

Corner Commonwealth Ave. and Valentine St., 

West Newton. 
Patch, G. W., with Brown-Durrell Co., Kingston St., 

Boston. 

Walker, L. S., Assistant Chemist, Experiment Sta- 
tion, Amherst. 

Whittaker, C. L., Munson-Whitaker Co.. 103 Union 
Ave., Mt. Vernon. N. Y. 

Williams, P. F., Assistant Horticulturist, Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute and Experiment Station, 
Auburn, Ala. 

Willis, G. N., 124 Oxford St., Cambridge. 

Yeaw, F. L,, Vacaville, Cal., Plant Pathological 
Investigations, Department of Botany, Univer- 
sity of California. 

'07, '06, '08. — Many will be interested to know 
that, in the Civil Service Test for City Forester for 
Chicago, in which thirty men competed, the four 
M. A. C. men who entered were among the fourteen 
who passed. With their standing, they were : 

3d.— M. H. Clark, Jr., Assistant Forester for Buf- 
falo, N. Y., 85.7$. 



4th. — C. A. Tirrell, Land Engineer, Lincoln Park, 
Chicago. 84.1$. 

5th. — W. A. Cummings, Forester, Lincoln Park, 
Chicago, 82.3<J. 

10th. — E. D. Phllbrick, Representing Munson- 
Whitaker Co., 1001 Monadnock Bldg.. Chicago, 
78.1$. 

This speaks well for their training at M. A. C. and 
their efforts since graduation. 

'08. — The class letter has been Issued. 

'08.— D. P. Miller is with Vaughan"s Seed Store. 
84-86 Randolph Street, Chicago. He Is working at 
Western Springs In their employ. 

'08. — T. L. Warner has accepted a position with 
the Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

'08. — The marriage engagement of R. D. Whit- 
marsh and Miss Emma F. Nichols has been 
announced. 

'08.— K. E. Gillette visited college last week. 



Intfrcoll^ia-te 



Bowling has been made an intercollegiate sport in 
the Northwestern Conference. 

The Intercollegiate Outdoor Championship Rifle 
Meet will be held at Sea Girt. N. J.. June 19. 

An engineering graduate of the University of Illi- 
nois won a milliner's prize for a woman's hat design. 

An agitation is on foot at Yale to make the wear- 
ing of caps and gowns by the seniors a daily practice. 

The students in the arts course at Cornell have 
voted decisively against the adaption of the honor 
system. 

About $80,000 has already been pledged for the 
new gymnasium at Dartmouth. Work on the build- 
ing may be begun this spring. 

The summer school of the University of Wiscon- 
sin is being enlarged. Two hundred and thirty-five 
courses will be offered this year. 

The Rhodes scholars in England are making ar- 
rangements to send a baseball team to America this 
summer to play games with several colleges. 

The twenty-eighth annual convention of the New 
England Intercollegiate Press Association will be held 
in Boston at the Hotel Westminster, on Friday, May 
21. 



I 












I'M 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 



GOODS FOR MEN 




My Woolens Are Now on the Market 

A great selection of imported and domestic goods. 
A big line of flannel trousers from $5-So-$i 2.00, 
and they are genuine and up to date in style. 
Guaranteed for first class fit and workmanship. 

Pressing, cleaning, dyeing and altering neatly 
done. 

FULL PRE SS >UITS TO RENT 

Amherst, Mass. 

phone 54-4 



11 Amity Street, 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

'AIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



INTER-COLLEGIATE BUREAU OF ACADEMIC COSTUME 

College Caps and 6oipns. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y, 

Official makers to the American Colleges and 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 



Raiw's 3nn, 

Old South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Modem Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB. DAY. 

When in " Hsmp." atop with ua. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



It's Your Next at the 



Bieisi House Bamei Slop 



Four First Class Barbers 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



Open Mondays from 


J A. m. to 8 P. M 


Tuesdays ; 


y~m 6 ■ 


Wednesdays, ; 


1 ** 8 " 


Thursdays, ■} 


6 " 


Fridays, J 


r " 8 " 


Saturdays, j 


r •« 11 " 






E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRANO FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our PertUlzer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE 60E- 



24-26 Stone Street, 





NEW YORK. 



WRIGHT 6l DITSOK 

Manufacturers and DeaJm in High Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It to generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRIQHT & OlfSON 
have the best looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The WRIGHT A DIT- 
SON SWEATER* rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweater*. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

^WRIGHT «Ss DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

18 WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridgk, Mass. 




Everything 
"For The Land's Sake" 

What sort of plant food have 
you learned to consider best adapted 
to different classes of crops? 

What formulas have been 
settled upon for potatoes to cover 
climatic and market conditions in 
Massachusetts? 

Do they not approximate, if they 
do not closely match, the Stock- 
bridge Special Manures? 

Study the plant food problem. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 

43 Chatham St., Boston 



BASE BALL 

UPPLI 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

K. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Bank, AMHERST 



Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 




Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Av*> , Nkw Yokk. 



1 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GonneGtiGut valley street Railway Go. 

AMHKKST DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Auiberatand Northampton on tlie hour and 
half hour from 6.30 A. U. till 10.30 P. U. Sundays Hie first car 
will leave at 8.80 A.M. 

MAIM OFFICE, UREBKFIELD, MASS. 

John A.Taggart, Supt. 

NORTHAMPTON OFFICE, 102 M AIN 8T. 

C. W. Clapp, A est- 8upt. Telephone, Northampton, 12618 . 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To »av«) y our sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall. 



notice to fllumni 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.80 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 



Don't miss this opportunity to get 
views of the college. 

1 of the best 5x7 Photos, $ 1 .00 
10 8x10 Photos, $2.00 



Address, Waldo D. Barlow, 1909, 

Amherst, Mass. 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size fof a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



OKUE>Iv'» X>R*JG STORE 



WOODWARDS LUNCH 



27 Main St., 



Northampton. 



Masonic Block, near Dwpot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted for Its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 A. M. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTURER of 

soda wATKres, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, ltlrch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountain* charged to order 



Kivee Street, 



Northampton, Hah. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



O. ». GATES, I >.!>.£*. 
DENTAU ROOMS, 

CUTI.KK'S BLOCK AM1IEK8T. MASK 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. II. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ... A MIIKUST. M ASS. 

office Hours: 

9 to 12 a.. m_, 1-30 to b i». xa.. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Ou administered when desired 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up-to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. *82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



l*f .A..C A«'t, 



C. 



Wlfil*!*, «00 



Oet Sample Ratea for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S^SATISFAOTION 3UAHANTEED.»'h t 

B. A. VTLMY, Mmnugtr. 

Office ■ 

East Fleasazit Street. 

Your Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATCH MAKER 



1 1 Amity St., 



Amhkkst, Mass. 



Mainsprings, I year fl.oo 

Cleaning, Ji.oo 

Prompt reliable work at Lowest Prices. 



The Children are Happy, 
Because HMtl clothes are made on the New Home Pewino 
Machine, which fact, aexiirm them of no "rip*." Mothers 
should get one at once as It will do for their children in year* 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



i 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 

Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in their proper 
seasons. No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to a dance or even a football game without sending 
her some flowers. Better than candy for results. 



OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Arthur E. Dorr. 



L. H. ToURTKLOTTE 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS ABD JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 

Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

Hiffh Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Offldal Athletic Supplies 

Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Ice Skates 
Hockey 

Qq|j Gymnasium 

Apparatus 



Uniforms 
for all 
Athletic 
Sports 



Official 
Implements 

for all 
Track and 
Field Sports 

Soaldlne's handsomely illustrated catalogue of 
^11 sports contains numerous suggestions 
Mailed free anywhere 

A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. 

73 Federal St., - - Boston. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, • • Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES* BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE, 
Telephone Connection, AMHERST, MASS 

JTlrtyrROTT 

PLUBER. STEflWl & BBS FITTER. 

DUD DEALER III STOVES AND RHNGES. 



Shop t5 i-a North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-1*. 



M. B. MAORATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPLKTK LINK OK GOODS 
SUITKO TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, PUIowb, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



ESTABLISHED 1881. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NKW YORK. 

IMPORTERS ANl> MANUFACTURERS OP 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 



We handle the but of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



LET 



LEW 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



GERARD. N. LEW. 

19 PLEASANT ST. REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MAS8. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Hath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rales to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 






A/wast , Ma$$. 



■ 






.»«— 



«< THE 



3- 



flfoassacbusetts 
Bgricultural 

Golleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persona of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the Luted 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks* course for country clergymen wibhing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2 A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
ftodTes during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
Gavelet the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture General Horti- 
TlLe Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
ary S^^ Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modem Languages, 
Chemistry, ZoSlogy, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Bctterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLE&E SMAL 



VOL. 19 



NO. 16 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 




COLLEGE 









AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 26. 1909 






WHITE I^IvAlVIVEIv 'TROUSERS, 

SOFT SHIRTS, 

(With The Collars) 

IN AN ENDLESS VARIETY. 



I 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



page's SDoe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VIOLIN, BRflJO, WAlflDOliIN, GUITAK STHINGS. 

OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 1 7 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 
best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 
branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 

190 Pearl St., - - Hartford, Conn. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 
M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS~. MAY 26. 1 



909 



NO. 16 



** to ..1 briber, un.i, it. discontinuarTi. 0^^^^^ "tub^^ 00 ^ " S '°" AL - *—" * "*» Th. S,oha L w„. be 
notify the Bualneas M onger. ™ "' P " d ' s «*«»"»™ who do not recelre their paper regularly are reque.ted to 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. Editor-ln-Chlef 
E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager 

HENRY A BROOK* torn* E °2^ R ^ BR0WN ' 191 '■ Assistant Business Manager 
HtNRY A. BROOKS. 1910. Acting Editor-in-Editor. miliar *oZ\ ,.. « 

JOS1AH C. FOLSOM. 1910, Alumni Note.. mpJ: £ a?.°e ' " l0, 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911, College Notes. ^1*, ^ LEN ' ""• 

ALoIn C. BRETT. ,9I 2 . Clrcu., to „ Depart * ^^ 
AUEttT W. DQDQg. 1912. Circulation Department. 



Athletic Notes. 
Department Notes. 
1911. Special. 



T.n,., »,.oo p.T^~rJ*^nc^ im9l . Copi „ t l0c . s^,.,.- ..^. „, UoJted 3^— 



The Union. 
Ath>etic Board. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Base Bali Association. 
Track Association. 
Hockey Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

Turner, Pres. College Senate. 



Canada. »«c. extra. 



L. C 



H. W 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
R. H. A'len. Manager. 
E. J. Burke, Manager. 
R. S. Eddy, Manager. 
Schermerhorn. Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter, Poat Offtea aTAmherar 



Fraternity Conference. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index 

Y. M. C A. 

Musical Association. 

Tennis Association, 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblad. Pres. 
H. W. Blaney. Manager. 
F. T. Haynes. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 
F. L. Thomas, Manager. 



Editorials. 



The next and last issue for the year of the Signal 
will appear June 2 1 . 



It is the desire of the Signal Board that next year 
the Signal be made a weekly instead of a bi-weekly 
publication. Such a paper would be reduced to eight 
pages and would be similar in make-up to the Amherst 
Student, the Williams Record and the M. I. T. Tech. 
To do this the membership of the Board must be 
increased and the hearty support of the alumni and 
student body ensured. Comment on such a possible 
change is requested. 



Mr. Critchett's account, given in detail in our 
columns, of the organization of the student body at 
M. I. T. shows a needed change in some of our 
organizations. The point system which has just been 
instituted at Tech. would hardly do here, owing to the 
small number of students. Student control of the j 



Dining Hall would be impossible at present. But a 
new form of governing body could be instituted that 
would more fully represent the different college inter- 
ests. Plans for the formation of a new College 
Senate should be made at once, In order to have It In 
running order by next September. It would be up to 
a committee of the Junior class to take this matter 
up and carry it through. Possibly a plan as follows 
could be worked up. The College Senate to consist 
of at least 15 members to Include the presidents of 
the four classes ; the managers of the athletic teams; 
representatives of the fraternity conference and the 
M. A. C. Union; the president of the Y. M. C. A. ■ 
the editor-in-chief of the Signal, representatives of 
the different clubs, such as the Stockbrldge. the 
Chemical and the Entomological clubs; and any other 
organization directly connected with the student life. 
Later, plans should be perfected for a more system- 
atized method of controlling the student funds and of 
auditing all reports. With the rapid increase In num- 
bers of the students at M. A, C. more vital changes 
and improvements must be made. 






f 



i86 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Athletic No-US- 



BASEBALL. 

Vermont, 4; M. A. C, I. 
Vermont University defeated our team on the 
campus May 1 1. The game was slow at times, but 
brilliant at other times. Haynes was effective at all 
times, striking out ten men, and giving no bases on 
balls, although he hit a man. Smith made the star 
play of the game in the seventh, taking Collins' high 
fly back of short. Tilton and Hubbard also fielded 
well, while Burrington and Shaw played snappy ball 

for Vermont. 

Vermont got a man to third on the first, but he did 
not score. After Gollison had fanned, H. Williams 
got to first on E. Williams's fumble, stole, and ad- 
vanced on Burrington's sacrifice to center, but was 
left on McConnell's out to Piper. The second part of 
the inning was somewhat similar. After Warner had 
struck out, Thayer hit safely to center. Haynes' 
error let him reach third, and Hubbard first. Hub- 
bard stole second, but no scoring was done, for the 
next two men struck out. 

Shaw opened the second by driving a hot one 
through the pitcher's box. He stole second, and 
kept on to third when French's throw went wide. A 
passed ball permitted him to score. Collins received 
a pass, but the next three men were easy. Vermont, 
1 ; M. A. C, 0. 

In the fourth, with two out, Tilton hit safely to 
left. Smith hit a hard one to short, which H. Wil- 
liams could not recover in time to get Smith. Tilton 
tried to make third on it, but was out by a narrow 
margin, Williams to Hill. 

In the fifth, with one out, Piper stopped one of 
Haynes' shoots with his back, but was caught trying 
for second. E. Williams hit safely through short, 
and also was caught before he could annex second. 

The seventh opened with a pass to Shaw. Collins 
lifted a high one back of short, in the capturing of 
which Smith did the cleverest bit of fielding seen on 
the campus for some time. O'Dea hit down the 
right foul line, and was safe. Haynes flied out to 
left. Hill's hit to left scored Shaw, but Collison was 
unable to bring O'Dea home. Score 2-0. 



performed by Tilton and Hubbard. H. Williams 
opened with a hit over Smith. Burrington sacrificed 
him to second. McConnell rapped one at Tilton. 
who held Williams on his base momentarily, then 
threw McConnell out at first, and covered his bag in 
time to take Hubbard's perfect return and tag out 

Williams. 

The visitors scored two more in the last. With 
Shaw down, Collins was hit, and stole. O'Dea 
grounded to Tilton. Haynes hit to center, but 
reached third through O' Grady's error. Collins 
scoring. A passed ball let the fourth and last run in. 
Hill was third out. 

It was in the last of the ninth that we scored our 
run. Hubbard hit to center, and came all the way 
round when 'Grady put the ball into the pines for 
two bases. Tilton flied out to Shaw, and O'Grady 
was nailed at home on Smith's grounder to Haynes, 
Smith also being out on the play. Score, 4- 1 . 

VERMONT. 



Collison, 2b, 
H. Williams, s., 
Burrington. c, 
McConnell, c.f. 
Shaw, lb, 
Collins. LI.. 
O'Dea, r.f.. 
Haynes, p., 
Hiil. 3b.. 

Total. 



Warner, l.f.. 
Ackerman, l.f.. 
Thayer, r.f.. 
Hubbard, lb.. 
O'Grady. c.f.i 
Tilton. 3b.. 
Smith, s.. 

French, c.t 

Piper. 2b., 

E. Williams, p., 
Total, 



A.B. 

4 
3 
2 

4 
3 
2 

4 
4 
4 

30 



Runs— Shaw 2, Collins, 



M. A. C. 

A.B. 

3 

I 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
2 
8 

32 
Haynes, Hubbard. 



H. 



1 





3 



\ 

1 

1 



H. 



2 

1 
I 
I 
1 




I 



P.O. 

1 
2 
II 
I 
1 
1 
1 

I 

27 



P.O. 

1 





13 

1 
1 

4 
S 
1 
I 

27 



A, 

1 
I 

2 

9 


5 
1 

19 



A. 





1 



4 


I 
I 

6 
13 



E. 





10 



1 



I 



B. 







I 




1 



1 



Sacrifice hits— Burrington 



, KrS^-JT »£"%£ Co^hayer . Hub*^ Two- 

^^^™^2 Ha ^Splteh-Wmini Tlme-.h.45m. Um- 
pire-Foley. Attendance— 600. 

Trinity, 4; M. A. C, 3. 

Our ball team lost its game with Trinity at Hart- 
ford, May 19, by one run. The game was fast at 
times, but loose at others, the base running by Trinity 
being excellent, while their fielding was very inferior. 
After Trinity had raised their total to three by scoring 
twice in the fourth, Williams replaced Hubbard in the 
box, and allowed only one more run. t was not 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



.87 



In the last a good substantial rally scored two more, 
but the tying run did not materialize. 
The score ■ — 



TRINITY. 



Connor, l.f., 
Webster, c.f.. 
Smith, c, 
Sanders. 3b.. 
Carroll. 2b.. 
Cook, p.. 
Abbey, lb.. 
Turner, s., 
Olsen, r., 

Total, 



Warner, l.f.. 
O'Grady. c.f., 
Thayer, r.f.. 
Hubbard, p., lb. 
Tilton, 3b., 
Smith, s.. 
French, c. 
Hosmer. I b., 
Williams, p., 
Bean, 2b„ 



4 
4 
3 
4 
I 
I 

2 
3 
3 



I 


I 

1 




1 






P.O. 



13 



A. 





I 

2 
2 


6 

I 



25 



M. A. C. 



A.B. 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
4 



1 
I 
1 
I 


I 







27 



P.O. 



I 


10 
2 

4 

I 
3 



12 



A. 




3 
I 

3 

6 
6 
I 



M- A. C, 4; Vermont, 2. 
Our band of ball tossers wound up their Vermont 
trip last Saturday in excellent shape, showing lots of 
speed and doing the heavy part of the batting. 
Twelve hits, with fourteen for a total, was good for 
four runs, fast fielding by Vermont, though erratic at 
times, keeping the runs from coming in. Williams 
was unsteady during the first inning, and both of Ver- 
mont's runs came then. After that they could not 
hit consecutively, and could not score. In the sixth 
French's double drove In two runs, tying the score. 
Another came in the seventh and the last in the 
eighth. 

The score: — 



M. A. C. 



a TaUl 36 5 24 20 1 

hit^ n s S m^'car^ n 2 de cU- f^'^ggSTSS^k SEE? 

Vermont, 9; M. A. C, 3. 

As the result of an off day on Hubbard's part. Ver- 
mont was able to put nine runs across the pan, and 
won easily. Our eight hits, total ten, would win 
most games, but Vermont went some better, fifteen, 
total twenty-one. Slow base running kept our men 
from completing the circuit when they reached first. 

The score : — 



VERMONT. 



Collison, 2b.. 
McConnell, c.f.. 
Shaw. 3b.. 
Haynes. p., 
Burrington, c, 
Collins, l.f. 
Hill, s., 
Thomas, lb.. 
Gerrard, r.f., 

Total. 



Thayer, l.f., 
, 3b.. 
Smith, s.. 
Hubbard, p., 
O'Grady, c.f., 
Warner, r.f., 
French, c, 
Hosmer, lb. 
Bean, 2b.. 



R. 
1 

2 
2 
2 
1 
I 
I 






M. A. C. 











1 

2 






1 
I 

2 
I 
I 

4 
I 
1 
3 

15 



H. 






P.O. 

1 
I 




12 



2 
I I 



27 



P.O. 

I 

1 

3 

I 

2 

1 

4 

10 



A. 

4 



5 

I 

2 



2 





14 



A. 


2 
3 
5 








R. 


H. 


P.O. 


A. 


t 





2 


2 











2 


1 


2 





1 


3 


2 


3 





t 


1 


12 





n 








3 








1 


2 








n 

















1 


1 


6 


2 


n 





1 





7 


o 








1 


3 


i 


— 


— 


mm 






4 


12 


27 


16 


i 


VERMONT. 










R. 


H. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 








2 


3 





1 











1 




















1 


7 


2 


? 


1 


2 


1 











1 


3 


4 


1 





2 


2 


1 











2 











1 


7 


1 








1 


3 


1 


1 



Thayer, l.f.. 
Tilton, 3b.. 
Smith. 2b., 
Hubbard, lb., 
O'Grady, c.f., 
Hosmer. r.f.. 
Warner, r.f , 
French, c, 
Williams, p.. 
Bean, s.. 

Total, 



Collison, 2b., 
Williams, r.f.. 
Gerrard. r.f., 
Burrington c. 
Collins, c.f., 
McConnell. p., 
Shaw, 3b.. 
Haynes. l.f., 
Thomas, lb., 
Hill. s.. 

T Total - 1 • » J| 1 

TnZ° 'f^n. hi, ^ McC0n D ne "' Th "»-«*» hit-French. Stolen bases- 
Tilton. Co'llns. Shaw Base on baPs-by Williams 3; bv McConnell s 
S, ^ k 0U !C b r?, Wi " iam * 4: b y McConne'l 6. SacrifFce ffi „ .' 
nngton. Double play -Hill to 'ColHson. Wild pitch-McConneH Passed 
bair-French. Umpire- McDonald. Time- 1 h 50m wunnc " raMea 



t:ZZ^ <**"** . ™. M , - »* « - *. .** «* » «» -*. .» * . ~ — 



T «a». 3 8 24 10 2 

r-rrfi ^ Ms-Smith, French. Thrae-base hits-Shaw. Haynes Ger- 
E£ Stolen bases-McConnell, Shaw. Collins. Gerrard 2 FtaS tase on 
Ve h7. y T H h Ubbard l L S w ,roclt ou, - b > , Ha y nes » ' : by Hubbard ■" Sac° 
2 ii£J hon K s k Hit by pitched ball-Thayer. Wild pitches-Hubbard 
*• Umpire-McDonald. Time— Ih. 55m. 



INTERCLASS TRACK MEET. 

The last contest for the possession of the cup was 
held on Pratt Field May 13. 

The weather conditions were ideal and a large 
number of students were present. The track was in 
first-class condition and were it not for the fact that 
the contestants had not had much training a number 
of records would have been broken. As it was, there 
were four new records made. Warner '09. is 
credited with two records, as he cleared 9 feet 3 
inches in the pole vault, the previous record being 8 
feet 6 inches, and he won the 220-yard dash very 
handily in 24 1 -5 seconds. 






I 






i88 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



189 




Dickinson, '10. covered the 440 in 55 1-5 seconds. 
clipping one second from the old record, and H. C. 
Crosby, '09, threw the hammer 105 feet 4 inches for 

a new record. 

The best event of the day was the mile interclass 
relay. Noble, '09. slipped on the first turn and lost 
about 50 yards, which was gradually made up by the 
next three runners, Wilson. Crossman and Warner, 
the latter winning by about two yards. 

The class of 1909 won the most points in today's 
meet with 1910 second, and 1912 third. The cup, 
however, will go to 1910, as they have captured the 
most points in the three meets, namely the cross- 
country run in the fall, the indoor meet In March, 
and this outdoor meet. 

100-yard dash— Won by Warner. '09 ; Crossman, 
'09 second; Hathaway. '09, third. Time, 10 3-5s. 
220-yard dash— Won by Warner, '09 ; Cloues. '10, 
second; French. '10, third. Time, 24 l-5s. 

440-yard dash— Won by Dickinson, '10; Clapp. 
'02, second ; Wales, '12. third. Time, 55 1 5s. 

880-yard run— Won by Prouty, Ml; Cowles, '10, 
second; Birdsall, '12. third. Time, 2.14 1-5. 

Mile run— Won by Tower. *12; Barrows. Ml, 
second; Nlckless, MO. third. Time, 5.05. 

Relay race mile— Won by 1909 (Crossman. Wil- 
son Warner.Noble); 1910 (Cloues, Schermerhorn, 
Hayward, Dickinson), second; 1912 (Wales, Wal 
ker, Clapp. Williams), third Time, 3.49. 

Running high jump— Won by Turner. 
Thomas. MO, second; Schermerhorn, '10, 
Height, 5 ft. 3 to. 

Putting 16-pound shot— Won by Turner, 
Crosby, '09. second; Hayward, MO, third, 
tance, 37 ft. 3 In. 

Pole vault— Won by Warner. '09; Waldron, 
second i Urban, third. Height, 9 ft. 2 In. 

Throwing discus— Won by Leonard ; Turner and 
Schermerhorn tied for second. Distance. 98 ft. 1 in. 
Broad jump— Won by Turner ; Hayward, second ; 
Waldron, third. Distance, 19 ft. 3 in. 

Throwing 16-pound hammer. Won by Crosby, 
•09; Elsenhaure, '12. second; Walker, '12, third. 
Distance, 105 ft. 4 in. 
Summary : 



100-yard dash. 
220-yard dash. 
440-yard dash. 
880-yard dash. 
Relay race. 
Mile run. 
High jump. 
Sh<->tput. 
Pole vault. 
Discus throw, 
Broad jump. 
Hammer throw. 

Totals. 
Previous points. 

Totals. 



1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


9 











5 


4 











5 





4 





3 


5 


1 


10 


5 





3 





1 


3 


5 


5 


4 








8 


1 








5 


4 








2 


7 








5 


4 








5 








4 


__ 


— 


— 


— 


54 


38 


8 


17 


36 


68 


7 


28 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


90 


106 


15 


15 



Collet f<lot?s. 



'09 : 
third. 

'09; 
Dis- 



TENNIS. 

The tournament with Wesleyan University at M. 
A. C. on April 30 had to be cancelled on account of 

rain. 

The rest of the schedule is as follows: 
May 28— Springfield Training School at M. A. C. 
j un e i_Bowdoin at Brunswick, Maine. 

2 Colby at Waterville, Maine. 

3 Bates at Lewiston, Maine. 

5_Springfleld Training School at Springfield. 

WILLIAMS WINS TENNIS MATCH. 

In the tennis tournament held Saturday, May 15. 
on the Taconic club courts at Williamstown, the M- 
A. C. team lost all of the six matches. The score 

Singles. 

Beineckeof Williams defeated Jen of M. A. & 

6-3, 6-0. 

Roper of Williams defeated L. M. Johnson of M 

A. C. 6-4, 6-2. 

Benton of Williams defeated Rockwood of M. A 

C. 6-2, 6-0. 

Kuh of Williams defeated Webb of M. A. C. t>- 

6-0. 
Doubles. 

Benton and Roper of Williams defeated Rockv:--- 

and Webb of M. A. C. 6-2, 6-3. 

Kuh and Conger of Williams defeated Johnson an- 
Jen of M. A. C. 6-0, 6-2. 

Roy Purrington of Florence addressed the Y. M- 
C. A. Thursday evening, May 15. 



A. J. Bourne, a graduate student, is to be assist- 
ant to Dr. W. E. Briton at the Connecticut Experi- 
ment Station this summer. 

The first production of the Junior show "The Toast- 
master" will be given in Montague on Friday evening, 
May 28, under the auspices of the high school of that 
town. 

H. A. Brooks and E. F. Damon attended the 28th 
annual meeting of the New England Intercollegiate 
Press Association at the Hotel Westminster In Boston 
on May 21st. 

L. B. Haskell, '04, Instructor in Agriculture, gave 
a stereoptican lecture before the Stockbridge Club on 
Tuesday evening, May 18. His subject was "The 
Potash Mines of Staasfurt, Germany and the Sodium 
Nitrate Mines of Chili." 

At a meeting of the Musical Association R. A. 
Waldron, MO, was elected president, L. S. Dickin- 
son, MO. re-elected manager and F. L. Thomas, MO, 
secretary and treasurer. The leaders of the clubs for 
next year are as follows : P. W. Allen, Ml. of the 
Glee Club, P. A. Racicot, Ml. of the Orchestra. 
Leader of the Mandolin Club to be announced later. 

The Juniors planted their class tree on the evening 
of May 17. The tree selected was a purple beech. 
the only one of its kind on the campus, and it was set 
out on the east side of Draper Hall. During the 
evening the class made merry around a large bonfire 
with songs and stories interspersed with refreshments. 
The committee in charge were H. W. French of 
Pawtucket, R. I., L. G. Schermerhorn of Kingston, 
R. !.. and A. W. Holland of Shrewsbury. 

REPORT OF BUSINESS MANAGER OF COL 
LEGE SIGNAL FOR 1908-1909. 

In accordance with the custom of the past mana- 
gers of the College Signal, ! hereby submit my 
report for the year 1908-1909 as audited : 

0. B. Briggs, Manager. 

This is to certify that 1 have examined the books 
and accounts of the College Signal for the year 
1908-1909 and find receipts of $922.47, expendi- 
tures of $917.82, a cash balance of $4.65, book 
assets of $549.45 and no liabilities indicated. 

H. T. Fernald, Auditor. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

May 27— Y. M. C A. 6-45 p. M .,ln Chapel. Speaker. 
Mr. Guy D. Gold '06, University of 
Penn.. Sec'y. Monmouth Co., 
N.J. Y. M. C. A. 
Debating Club. 7-45 p. m. in Chapel. 
28— Tennis, M. A. C. vs. S. T. S. 

Public meeting at Wilder Hall with talk 
by Mr. Warren H. Manning of 
Boston. The new campus plans 
will be on exhibition. 
30 — Memoral Day. 

30— Professor Hart's Bible Class. 12-30 p. 

m., in Chapel. 
31— Holiday; Battalion unites with the local 

G. A. R. in commemoration of 

Memorial Day. 

June 1— Rehearsal, Junior Play 7-00 p. m. 
Stockbridge Club. 7-00 p. m. 
2 — 4 15 p. m., Burnham Prize Speaking in 
Chapel. 

3— Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m., in Chapel. 

Debating Club, 7-45 p. m.. in Chapel. 
4 — Rehearsal, Junior Play 7-00 p. m. 

6— Professor Hart's Bible Class. 12-30 p.m., 

in Chapel. 
8 — Rehearsal, Junior Play 7-00 p. M. 

Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p. m. 
9 — Assembly, 1-15 p. m. 
10— Y. M. C. A.. 6-45 p. m., in Chapel. 
Debating Club, 7-45 p. m., in Chapel. 
12 — Baseball— M. A. C. vs. Boston College. 
13— Professor Hart's Bible Class, 12-30 p. 
m., in Chapel. 

15 — Final examinations begin. 

18— Presentation of "The Toastmaster" by 
the Junior Class, 8-00 p. m., at 
the Amherst town hall. 

19— 3-00 p. m., Baseball, Sophomore- Fresh- 
man game. 

4-30 p. m., Baccalaureate address by 
President Butterfleld, in the 
Chapel. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



191 



21 — 11-00 a. m. Phi Kappa Phi. 

3-30 p. H., Prize drills and battalion drill. 
7-00 Open air concert and sing. 
8-30 p. »., Fraternity banquets. 




INFORMAL 

.•Last and best Informal. May 22. ALL COME! ' 
It was this announcement, posted by the committee 
which stirred so many men to go to the Informal last 
Saturday and which made it the most successful and 
most enjoyable one of the whole year. 

The poor weather, which has had to be endureo 
now for the last two times, did not prevent the largest 
attendance of the year nor dampen the enthusiasm 
of those who attended. The Drill Hall was very 
tastily decorated for the occasion with streamers of 
red and white bunting with the great flag poruoning 
off the northern end of the hall. Many potted plants 
from the Plant Houses were banked about the cor- 
ners and the platform. The only thing to be 
regretted was that the poor weather prevented he 
couples from strolling about the campus between the 

^ThT music, furnished by Derrick's Westfield 
Orchestra, was greatly appreciated by all as was the 
fine Informal supper partaken of at Draper Hall. 

The patronesses were :-Mrs. G. E. Stone and 
Mrs P H. Smith of the faculty, Miss Eton of Mt. 
Holyoke, and Miss Joslin of Smith College. 

Those in attendance were : 1909-W. D. Barlow 
P P Cardln. H. P. Crosby, S. S. Crossman, W. 
L Ide R. C Lindblad. H. C. Noble, H. D. Phelps. 
R C Potter. M. W. Thompson. J. Noyes; 1910— 
R H Allen, R. B. Annis, R. P. Armstrong. L. C. 
Brown, L. Brandt. W. A. Cloues. S. C. Brooks H. 
A Brooks. L. S. Dickinson, R. S. Eddy, J. C. 
Folsom, M. S. Hazen, F. T. Haynes, W. E. 
Leonard, F. P. Nickless, F. A. Partridge W. M 
Titus F. L. Thomas, E. H. Turner, A. F. Rock- 
wood! R. A. Waldron; 1911 — P. v/. Allen, H W. 
Blaney. J.E.Dudley. N.H.Hill. E. A^ Lanrabee, 
H. B. Morse, G. P. Nickerson, G. A. 
F. D. McGraw, A. H. Sharpe, 
son, E. E. Warren, E. L. 
Sharpe L. 0. Stevenson, E. E. 
Wl nn-'l912-W. J. Birdsall, J. Carpenter, J. W 
Covill' J. T. Finnegan, H. D. Hemenway, F. B. 



Hills, Q. S. Lowry, W. E. Philbrick. E. j. Robin- 
son, A. N. Raymond, B.C. Southwi;k, D. G 
Tower, H. C. Walker, S. Williams; Professor Has- 
brouck. Dr. MacLaurin, H. D. Haskins P. H. 
Smith, K. E. Gillett, '08. F. E. Thurston, 08 W. 
I Adams, ex-'09.j.C.Bebe.ex,09 H R M D ; LuU, 

ex-'09, R. F. Gaskill, P. N.Paul, J-"-^" *'* 
W. Searle, and Master Philip Hasbrouck with Miss 

Mildred Rowe. 



THE JUNIOR BANQUET. 

The junior Banquet was held on the evening of 
May 14, at the Hotel Garde, Hartford. Conn. Those 
attending, numbering about thirty, made the round 
trip by a special car of the Connecticut Street Rart- 
way At 8-00 o'clock tho class gathered around the 
table which was beautifully decorated with roses and 
carnations. After an excellent banquet had been 
served, the class president. R. S. Eddy acting as 
toastmaster introduced the following speakers who 

responded to toasts . 

r W. R. Clarke 

191 °- „ J P. Blaney 

Baseball. FootoaU. etc.. M . S . Hazen 

Clarence. H T Cowles 

1912- ,, ., L. G. Schermerhorn 

Your Better Half. p R partrjdge 

Co-Education. £ p Damon 

Another Roll. p T Haynes 

One Year More. w E Leonard 

M.A. C. , 

The following men responded to impromtus: J. 
C. Folsom, j. C. Bailey. A. Kelley, ex-'lO, LS 
McLaine, R. H. Allen, L. S. Dickenson and L. 
Brandt. The banquet broke up at 1 1 o clock, the 
men remaining at the hotel over night and returning 
to Amherst the following day. The members of the 
banquet committee were: L. S. McLaine of New 
York City. E. H. Turner of Reading, and A. W. 
Holland of Shrewsbury. 



L. O. Steven- 

Winn, A. H. 

Warren, E. L. 



NOTICE. 

Anyone desirous of attending the Y. M C A 
conference at Northfield in July should pass in their 

.« p T Havnes '10. Literature pertaining 
names to P. l.nayne* ^. 

to the conference may be obtained from the North- 
L committee: Brooks '10, Baker >ll and 
Brett '12. 



BATTALION INSPECTION. 

Capt. Julius A. Penn of the general staff of the 
war department inspected the battalion of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College Thursday afternoon, May 
13. A large number of visitors from town and near- 
by places witnessed the maneuvers the battalion went 
through. Assembly was sounded at 2 o'clock, and 
the companies immediately went on to the field. A 
review was held first, after which the companies were 
inspected by Capt. Penn. Battalion drills were then 
in order under the command of Maj. Rockwood C. 
Lindblad, 1909, of Grafton. After this the com- 
panies were drilled by their respective officers, Capt. 
L. S. Corbett, 1909, of Jamaica Plain was in charge 
of Co. A., Capt. Henry W. Turner of Cuba was in 
command of Co. B. and Co. C was drilled by Capt. 
Potter of Concord. 

After the company drills the battalion was called 
together and Capt. Penn gave a problem in advance 
guard and ordered it executed by Maj. Lindblad. 
The battalion was taken to the experiment stations 
and the major detailed Co. A for the advance guard. 
Co. B for the main body, and Co.C for the rear guard. 
Capt. Corbett detailed four privates, under Sergeant 
Turner, 1910, for the point. Lieut. C. R. Webb 
had command of the first platoon, which skirmished 
the territory to the veterinary laboratory, and Lieut. 
H. J. Neale had command of the second platoon, 
which followed. After the batallion was collected 
again a short parade and battalion drill was executed. 
Capt. Penn, in speaking to the officers after the 
inspection, said he was favorably impressed with the 
showing made, but said there was still a chance for a 
great deal of improvement in certain of the smaller 
details. He afterward made an inspection of the 
dormitories. 



ASSEMBLY ADDRESSED 
BY MR. CRITCHETT OF M. I, T. 

Mr. Critchett, a student at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, addressed the Assembly of 
May 19, on "The Organization of the Students at 
M. I. T. He said in part : "We have at the Insti- 
tute 1500 students, with no college dormitories, and 
forced to live in private families, etc. During their 
first two years they are pretty well mixed up in their 
classes and in that way they come to know each other 



to some extent. In their third and fourth years, how- 
ever, they have elected a course and from that time 
on, practically their only acquaintances are the men 
in that course. Some change had to be made to do 
away with the political ring in the student elections. 
The first move was made by the Alumni who Institut- 
ed the Advisory Committee consisting of alumni 
This improved the financial conditions, but made 
athletics at the Institute worse 

The next change was made by the students them- 
selves. They formed an Athletic Association made 
up of five members of each class and the managers 
of the athletic teams. Three men from this commit- 
tee were ehcted to the Alumni Council. This Ath- 
letic Association advise as to how the money shall be 
spent and these bills must then be O. K.'d by the 
Alumni Committee. In 1900 the Institute Commit- 
tee was formed consisting of two men from each class 
and the class presidents. The Senior class president 
is president of the committee, and sub-committees 
carry on the different tasks, each being responsible to 
the President. 

This Committee has accomplished much at the 
Institute the establishment of the Tech Union, and 
the Point system being the most important. Other 
projects are in view which will soon be permanently 
established." 

Mr. Critchett spoke of the Tech Union, the Athlet- 
ics, the Tech Show, the Technique, the Tech, the 
work of the Musical clubs. In time these will all be 
respectively under the supervision of the Institute 
Committee. After his talk he gave the students a 
chance to question him in regard to Tech, several of 
the men availing themselves of the opportunity. 



FORESTRY AT MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

From the beginning the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College has paid considerable attention to forestry. 
Courses of lectures have frequently been given, prizes 
offered and interest aroused in other ways. A con- 
siderable number of graduates from the institution 
have gone into forestry work and some of these are 
recognized today as amongst the leading professional 
foresters of the country. Nevertheless, there has 
been a strong feeling in recent years that the college 
ought to do more for forestry, and that in particular 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



93 



there should be established permanent courses dealing 
with modern professional forestry and forest manage- 
ment. . 
While something still depends upon the action of 
the present legislature, matters have progressed far 
enough now to make it seem fairly certain that the 
work can be opened up to advantage this coming 
autumn, with the opening of the fall semester, Sep 
tember 1909. The plan is definitely to establish a 
complete and permanent department of forestry in the 
Division of Horticulture. President Butterfield and 
Professor Waugh have been for some months engaged 
in a quiet search for a suitable man to head this 
department. While the man has not been selected, 
there are two or three very promising candidates in 
view. No serious trouble is anticipated in securing a 
good man for the work. 

' The present plan is to offer two straight years of 
professional forestry. These will be given in the 
form of elective courses covering junior and senior 
years, and will have very much the same standing in 
the college curriculum as landscape gardening and 
botany now have. The courses will be available, 
therefore, not only to men who wish to become pro- 
fessional foresters, but a certain amount of the work 
can be elected by landscape gardeners, tree doctors, 
farm managers, or any other students who. for any 
reason, are Interested in forestry. In all probability 
some short courses will also be given. Professor F 
William Rane, state forester, will continue on the 
staff of the college faculty as lecturer in forestry and 
will assist the department in various ways. 

The courses of study proposed, though strictly pro- 
fessional and reasonably complete In themselves, are 
not expected to duplicate the work done at such 
forestry schools as Harvard and Yale. The work in 
those institutions is post graduate in character, while 
at Massachusetts Agricultural College, the courses 
will be of undergraduate grade. Furthermore, a 
definite understanding has been secured between the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College and the two in- 
stitutions named looking toward direct cooperation 
It is expected that men who take forestry courses at 
MAC and afterward go to Yale and Harvard 
forest schools will receive full credit for such courses. 
The establishment of this new department means a 
decided advance. It is a big undertaking, but one 
which is sure to succeed because of the widespread 
Interest in forestry. 



^i^BiASSACHUSETTS AGGIES" WHOM 

I KNOW. 

X Joseph Edward Root. M. D.. B.Sc. was 
born in 1854, at Greenwich, Mass; prepared for col- 
lege at Barre High School ; entered M. A. C. fall of 
1872- Class Captain; Leader of Choir and Class 
Glee Club ; Class Orator j President College Chris- 
tian Union and Washington Irving Literary Society ; 
one of Freshman and Sophomore prize speakers; 
Commencement Speaker; graduating with 76. 
Teacher Institution for the Education of Feeble- 
minded Youth, Barre, 1876-78; Assistant Superin- 
tendent Walnut Hill Asylum, Hartford, Conn.. 1878- 
79. studied medicine with Thomas D. Crothers, 
M 'd (expert in treatment of inebriety), at Hartford, 
Conn 1878-79. and at College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, New York. 1879-83; M. D.,same, 1883; 
Assistant Physician Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, 
1883-84; Practicing Physician since 1884. Expert 
Alienist ; Member Hartford City and County and 
Connecticut State Medical Societies; American 
Medical Association, and Chairman Committee on 
Nominations at Milwaukee and San Francisco meet- 
ings ; Secretary Hartford County Medical Society 
1889-94- Member State Commissione de Lunatico 
Inqulrendo 1884-1896; one of Staff Physicians at 
Hartford Dispensary, also Secretary and Treasurer 
since 1886; President of Medical Board of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Masonic Home at Wallingford, Conn., 
since 1896; Chairman Building Committee for new 
Masonic Hospital, 1897; Surgeon First Company 
Governor's Horse Guards since 1896; Medical Ex- 
aminer Massachusetts Mutual Insurance Company 
1894, which positions he now holds; Member Society 
National Science, Sons of American Revolution, 
Washington Commandery No. 1. Knights Templar. 
Connecticut Consistory, 32°, 1896 ; Member Sphinx 
Temple, Mystic Shrine. Hartford ; President Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College Club of New York, 
1896, Vice-President Phi Sigma Kappa, 1897. 
Married Miss Ella G. Mosely. March 4. 1885; one 

daughter. 

Writings • Early Discovery of America by Norse- 
men ; Hunting Trip in the Rocky Mauntains (lecture) 
1899- Epilepsy; Electricity in Nervous Affections; 
Endarteritis of Brain ; Historical Address Hartford 
County Medical Society, centennial celebration, 



1893; Electricity in Removal of Facial Blemishes; 
Electricity in Gynecology; Hygiene of School Life; 
Hip-joint Disease ; Case of Fracture of Cervical 
Vertebras, with Recovery. Conn., Med. Society, 
1899. ; Case of Fracture of the Spine, with Recov- 
ery. Conn. Med. Society, May, 1901 ; British Med- 
ical Association, report as delegate Connecticut Med- 
ical Society, 1900. Transactions Conn. Med. Soc- 
iety, 1901. Address, Hartford, Conn. 

Dr. John C. Cutter '82. 



NECROLOGY. 

Mrs. Bertha (Lyman) Reynolds, wife of Dr. Percy 
Reynolds, the physical culture director, died Wednes- 
day evening at her home in North Amherst of acute 
Bright's disease. She was the daughter of Rev. Mr. 
Lyman of Fall River, who was at one time pastor of 
the Congregational church at Belchertown. She is 
survived by her husband, father, two brothers and a 
sister. Interment was in Fall River. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas. It hath pleased God in his infinite wisdom to 
sake unto Himself the wife of our beloved friend and instruc- 
tor. Percy L. Reynolds, be it 

Resolved. That we. the student body of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, do extend to him and to his family our 
heartfelt sympathy in this their hour of sorrow ; and be it 
further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, and that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

Oscar C. Bartlett, 
Arthur W. Hubbard. 
Roger S. Eddy, 
Herbert W Blaney, 
Ezra I. Shaw. 




MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

Captain George C. Martin, Commandant of the col- 
lege, has issued the following notice regarding the 
Commencement Prize Drill : — 

The following program is announced for the drills to 
take place on Monday June 21: Battalion Review 



and Inspection; Individual Prize Drills; Battalion 
Drill; Company Drill in close ordt r. and Bayonet 
Exercise by Co. A. ; Company Drill in close order 
and in Butts Manual of Physical Drills and in Calist- 
henics by Co. B. ; Company Drill in close order and 
Ceremony of Guard Mounting by Co. C. ; Battalion 
Parade; Awarding of Medals, Announcement of 
Promotions and Appointments for next year ; Award- 
ing of Militiry Diplomas. Trie Individual Drill will 
be In the Manual of Arms. Firings, add in the 
Bayonet Exercise. The Company Drills in close 
order, the Manual of Arms and in the Firings. For 
the Company Competitive Drills at least 75 per cent 
of the enlisted strength will take part. 

The Commandant has also announced the prizes, 
which the Department is able to furnish owing to the 
generosity of Mrs. Emily W. St-arns of Boston in 
her gift of $100. Tne prize for the best drilled com- 
pany will be a fLg, to be competed for annually. 
'I hree prizes will be i.iven to the three best drilled 
enlisted men of the battalion, first prize a gold medal, 
second prize a silver medal, and third prize a bronze 
medal. A gold medal will be given to that member 
of the junior class having the highest military stand- 
ing from entrance to the close of the junior year. A 
gold medal will be given to that member of the 
sophomore class having the highest military standing 
from entrance to the close of the sophomore year. 
A silver medal will be given to that member of the 
freshman class having the highest military standing 
during his freshman year. To be eligible to com- 
pete for the three last mentioned medais, a junior 
must have been in college at least five semesters, a 
sophomore at least three semesters, and a freshman 
at least two semesters. Three prizes will be given 
for the three best rifle shots on outdoor range. Three 
prizes will be given for the three best rifle shots in 
indoor (gallery) shoot, open to all members of the 
battalion; first prize a gold medal, second prize a 
silver medal, and third prize a bronze medal. Later 
the Commandant hopes to announce a prize of the 
presentation of a sword to the captain of the best 
drilled company. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

A sample of milk from the college received honora- 
ble mention at a milk show at Cincinatti, Ohio. 



< 






• 94 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•95 



The trustees of the college have voted to award 
the contract for building the new young stock barn 
to Allen Bros, of Amherst, at the figure given in their 
bid. which was $6,235. The structure is to be built 
in accordance with the specifications as given by Mr. 
Ritchie of Boston, the architect. The award of the 
contract for the new storage barn was given to George 
E Bosworth of Amherst. His bid was for $9,230. 
and it will be built in accordance with the architect s 
specifications, as amended by the treasurer's state- 
ment to him. and on condition of agreement to have 
the structure sufficiently completed by August 15, 
1909. for the purpose of storing hay. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONO- 
MICS. 
The school garden work started last week with 
twenty-nine pupils from the Kellogg Avenue school. 
The work is in charge of Miss Roy 10. 

The school committee of Pelham under Professor 
Hart's direction have been grading and planting 
shrubs and flowers on the grounds of the West 
Pelham school. 

HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 



Mr Tompson has his hands full of many matters, 
including the planning and planting of several crop 
projects on the Louisa Baker property and on the 
Harlow farm which tracts have recently been bought 
or rented by friends of the college. 



He most thoroughly 






Mr Frank M. Gracey. who has had charge of the 

drawing for two years, has been offered a position as 

nstrucL in drawing in the Massachusetts Inst.tute 

of Technology. As the offer includes a raise m 

salary and other advantages it has been accepted. 

The latest picture show in Wilder Hall has been 
an exhibition of portraits, figures and groupes includ- 
ing the best works of such artists as Mr. RF.OW. 
Mr William T. Knox. Mrs. Eleanor W W.llard 
and others. While these are not exactly Ian scape 
pictures they have proved very interesting to the 
students in landscape gardening. 

The next exhibition at Wilder Hall will be of legiti- 
mate landscape architecture. This will be the dta- 
Lot Plans by Mr. Warren H. Manning showing 
the proposed future development of the college 
grounds and estate. It will also include copies of 
designs for other college campuses and much ^ 
terial of general interest. Everybody is urged to see 
this exhibit. 



VETERINARY DEPARTMENT. 
Dr Peters, the chief of the Massachusetts cattle 
inspection board, has asked Dr. Paige to prepare the 
vaccine to be used in vaccinating cattle as a guard 
against black leg. The process comes from Ger- 
many and instructions are being sent out by the 
United States government. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

John D. Rockefeller has given another million 
dollars to the University of Chicago. This brings the 
total amount of his gifts to that institution to the 
twenty-five million mark. 

The University of Washington will give an inter- 
collegiate rowing regatta sometime in the future. 
One of the leading event will be a four-oared race 
with crews composed of women from that unlvers.ty. 
Night schools in New York City are to be sup- 
plemented by a night college when the college year 
opens in September. This has been decided by the 
trustees of the City College. Students who must be 
employed during the day will thus have a chance to 
obtain a higher education. 




NOTICE ALUMNI. 
The invitations are out for the Sophomore- 
Senior Promenade to be held on June 23. Apply 
to L. 0. Stevenson, If It. Don't fail to he here 
for the Prom. 

'88 —Herbert C. Bliss, 14 Mechanic St., Attle- 
boro. is putting in some of his spare moments this 
spring trying to learn the game of golf. Bogy on the 
Highland Country Club course of Attleboro is 38 for 
9 holes A few weeks ago, when playing on the 
team with the Mansfield Club, he made his lowest 



score for this season, 40. 
enjoys the game. 

'88.— George W. Cutler is now in the poultry 
business at Sunnyside Farm, Bridgewater. He is 
the father of three children, 11,8 and 6 years of age. 
He says he believes he is settled for life. For many 
years he traveled a great deal as a gymnasium 
instructor. 

'88.— E. E. Knapp, Llanwellyn, Pa., who is in 
the Mechanical Dept. of the Atlantic Refining Co. of 
Philadelphia, reports the serious sickness of his eldest 
son, Raymond, whom he had to take to the Chester. 
Pa. hospital to undergo an operation. Raymond 
passed through the operation exceedingly well and is 
now improving rapidly. Knapp says his garden is 
the best ever this year. 

'88.— Robert B. Moore, 5617 Girard Ave., Phil- 
adelphia, Supt. of the Fertilizer Works of the Amer- 
ican Fertilizer Works of the American Ag'l Chemi- 
cal Co.. is still taking a great deal of pleasure with 
his music cabinet. He claims it acts as a tonic to 
him, and is exceedingly restful to his nerves. Rob- 
ert is the proud father of two boys, 9 and 6 years old. 

'88.-Frank F. Noyes, 472 No. Jackson St., 
Atlanta. Ga., Supt. of Atlanta Electric plant. He is 
now holding the wheel of a Ford runabout. At pres- 
ent he is all Ford and can talk nothing else. Mr. 
Noyes and wife expect to visit M. A. C. at Com- 
mencement in 1910 when his class hold their next 
reunion. 

'88.— Thomas Rice. 2nd, is reporter for the Fall 
River Daily News, and makes police and court news 
his principal work. He makes the Hotel Savoy of 
that city his headquarters and still leads a single life. 

The Sicnal is indebted to an '88 man for the 
above notes. 

'92.— The class will hold a reunion at Commence- 
ment. 

'94.— Reunion at Draper Hall, M. A. C, June 
22, 9 p. m. 

'95 —Prof. E. A. White with the Reunion Com- 
mittee is planning for a very large and enthusiastic 
reunion of the class. Special effort is being made to 
have as many members as possible with their wives 
present at this time. Please acknowledge the let- 



ters which have been sent you so that your commit- 
tee can know just how many to be provided for. 
Suggestions as to the best form of entertainment are 
requested, and information concerning the members 
of the class which can be given is greatly to be 
desired. Please address all communications to Prof. 
E. A. White, Amherst, Mass. 

— H. L. Frost, Chairman Reunion Committee. 
'99. —Short Course.— ERRATUM— The stab- 
bing of W. A. Goodfield of Gilbertville took place in 
front of the Hardwick Hotel and not while leaving a 
Pomona Grange meeting as stated in th- last issue 
of the Sicnal. 

'02.— T. M. Carpenter is the co-author of Bulletin 
208 of the Office of Experiment Stations on "The 
Efficiency of th s Human Body as a Machine. " Mr. 
Carpenter is a chemist in the nutnti m laboratory of 
the Carnegie Institute. 

'05. — H. D. Crosby is at New Canaan, Conn., 
under E. A. Jones. 

'06. — Born to Mr. and Mrs. F. Civille Pray, at 
the Springfield Hospital, on May 19, a boy, Francis 
Civille Pray. Before her marriage last August, Mrs. 
Pray, formerly Miss E. Francis Hall of North Am- 
herst, was librarian at the college. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pray spent the winter on Central Trinidad, Trinidad^ 
Cuba, where Mr. Pray is employed as chemist and 
superintendent for the Trinidad Sugar Co. of Boston. 
He has been in the Cuban Sugar work since 
graduation. 

'07.— J. 0. Chapman visited college lately. He 
is on the road for Underwood & Underwood of New 
York City. 

'08.— H. C. Chase is at Harvard working on the 
fungus parasites of the brown-tailed moth for the 
Gipsy Moth Commission. 

'08.— B. C. Gowdy writes that he enjoys his work 
very much. The government has given him funds 
for fitting up an excellent laboratory. He is at 
Entabbe, Ugandy, British East Africa. 

Ex- '09. —Adams and sister visited college and 
attended last week's informal. 

Ex-'IO.— The engagement of Albert C. Kelley of 
85 Water St., Boston, to Miss Elsie A. Johnson of 
Robbinston, Me., has been announced. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




My Woolens Are Now on the Market 

A great selection of imported and domestic goods. 
A big line of flannel trousers from $5.50-$. 2.00, 
and they are genuine and up to *»«■«* 
Guaranteed for first class fit and workman* p. 

Pressing, cleaning, dyeing and altering neatly 

1 ° ne F U1.U DRESS SUITS TO RENT 

I. M. LABROVm 

Amherst, Mass. 

„ AMITY STKEKT, PHONE 5 4'4 



C & K DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS 



~SZ*12£2SEZ£ m Everything New and Up to Date 



COHF1MBD STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 

TAIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 

TAILU AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabat"; 3nn, 

_ „ ,„ NORTHAMPTON, MA8R. 

OM South Street, ort Main, ■«*" 

Modern Improvements, Fine Oatlook. 
BtMtlfal Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 



RATES, $2.00 PEB, DAT. 

When in " lUmp." stop with as. 
THE BEST PL^CE^TODINeTn THE CITY. 

r. J. RAHAJt^,, 



INTEK-COU.KG.ATH BUREAU OF ACADEM.C COSTUME 

College Caps andjjouws. It , s Yo ur Next at the 

C0T ^^r RD Wt hqusb m m 

Official makers to the American Colleges and ■ V* 
Universities from the Atlantic to the Pac.fic. 

Class Contracts a Specialty. 

__^ -| Four First Class Barbers 

JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



Open Mondays from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, a Confectionery and Fruit, 



Tuesdays 7 

Wednesdays, 7 

Thursdays, 7 

Fridays, 7 

Saturdays, 7 



6 
8 
6 
8 
11 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of F.xcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE COE- 



34-26 Stone Street, 





Ever> thing 
"For The Land's Sake" 



Professor Chester, Delaware Agricultural 
College, states that an average of 49 an 
alyst-s of soils shows enough potential 
phosphoric acid to produce 14 bushels 
wheat per acre per year for 500 years, 
enough potash for 1000 years, and enough 
nitrogen for 90 years; and yet that such 
soils may be practically barren of results 
because the plant food, vast as it is, is un- 
available for present needs. 

What fertilizers should the farmer use to 
utilize the potential fertility of the soil? 

Study the plant food prob/tm. 



NEW YORK. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 

43 Chatham St., Boston 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

Manufacturers and Dealers in Hieh Grade Athletic Supplies. 

Lawn Tennis Foot Ball 
Base Ball Basket Ball 
Hockey Golf Goods 

In Best Styles and Qualities 

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 
A SPECIALTY. 

It is generally conceded 
that the clubs equipped 
by WRIUHT & DITSON 
have the best looking, 
best fitting and most 
durable suits. 

The WKKiHT & DIT- 
SON SWEATERS rre 
easily the finest. Made 
of choice worsted, well 
made, perfect fitting. 
Nothing like one of our 
Sweaters. 




SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



CATALOGUE FREE 


WRIGHT «S? r3IT«oiV 


344 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON 


18 WEST 30TH ST.. NEW YORK 


Chicago Providence, K. I. Cambridge, Mass. 



Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

K. A. 'l"HOi\IJF»«OJV, 

Kear First National Bank, AMHERST 



CapsandGotons 

Makers to 06, 07, 08 Classes. 




wi 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Av«* , Nkw Yokk. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GouneGtiGut Valley Street Railway Co. notkc t0 jnumni 

AMHERHT DIVISION. i/V ■> ■ ^ ^ ♦ ^ ^ - - ▼^ 



AMHERST DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Au.hcrstaml Northampton on the boor un.l 
| m UbooMrou»VsOA.ll.tlU 10.30 P.M. Sunday* the fl»l car 
will •••ve.tSjaOA.M.^^ ( , rbknfi g 

John A.TaKgart.Supt. 

VllKTIIAMPTUM OKHCK, 102 MAIN »T. 

0. W. CUPP. AuVhS ^_Trt«pbone,KQrth»»ptoB I W : ». 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Coinetome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall. 

Mini & Sunderland stmt Railway Co. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 



Don't miss this opportunity to get 
views of the college. 

10 of the best 5x7 Photos, $1 .00 
110 8x10 Photos, $2.00 



Address, Waldo D. Barlow, 1909. 

Amherst, Mass. 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



$4.00 



3 ft. by 6 ft., - 

Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



r>i$ui$r*'8 okug »tork 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

Masonic Itlock, near Depot, OpM every day 
Lunches. Confectionery. Cigars Noted for its excellent 
Oyster Stew and clam Chowder. " cc,,env 
Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



o. 



DENTAL ROOMS, 



W. W. BOYBTTOlf, 

SANl'UlTUHKK OP 

SCXDA WATEKS, 

nneapp... Lemon ^""""T^mrc^r and u.nger 



KIVKK STKKBT, 



Nohthampton, Mais 



Henry Adams & Co. 

HE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



< UTI.KK'S BLOCK, 



AMHKKST, MAISt, 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. U. S. 
DENTAL BOOMS. 

WILLIAM*' BLOCS. AMI.KK.ST.MASS 

OKKICK 1 1. . I km 
9 TO 12 A.. M.. 1.30 TO 6 P. a*. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Projmetor. 



TRY OUR 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. *82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



JVI.A..O. Aif't, 



C. R.WKHIi, '<>t> 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SttfSATISFAOTION OUARANTEBD.t/^ 
B. A. VTLKT, Manm V rr. 

Omn : 

Ea st Pleasant Street. 



Vour Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATCH MAKER 



1 1 Amu v St., 



Amherst, Mass. 



Mainsprings, i year 

Cleaning, j,' <0o 

Prompt reliable work at Lowest I'tices 



The Children are Happy. 
Because ttieir clothes are made on the Nkw Humk mwinu 
Machine, which fact, aasvres them of bo "rli »." Mothers 
should get one at once as it will do for their children in year* 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



11 



1 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CUT FLOWERS 




A Specialty of College Classes. 




Violets, Chrysanthemums, etc. in the.r proper 
seasons No business-like fellow would take a girl 
to . dance or even a football game without sending | _ H(yr0 OR AJP H»R, 
lK;r M Howers. Betterth^andy for result, FH ^ ^ ^ 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 

L. H. TOURTKLOTTK. 
UK »• • '"■»"• 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOI.K8ALB DliWM AND JOBBKRS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 



ARTHUR E. DORK. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 
" treezers 

, orn , r North and I'nion Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 

I G. SPALDING & BROS. 



£cAi'ZZare's 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

U2 Main Street, - - « Northampton. Mahs. 

Tel. 332-2. 



The 

SPALDING 

Trade - Mark 




are the Largest 
Manufacturers in 
the World of . . . 

OFFICIAL 
EQUIPMENT 

FOR ALL 
ATHLETIC 
SPORTS AND 
PASTIMES 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES' BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 

AMHERST. MASS 
Telephone Connection, . 

rum, sTEfln * ens htteb, 

HID HUB H STOVES HMD RBUGES. 



reg. o. »• f» T - ° rr - 

H known throughout the 

world •» » 



, IF YOU 



arc interested 
in Athletic 

• s /' r .M you 
ihoi 



_ f I ; S I W " should have a 

Guarantee ol l» ;;/ &$^8$n 
QuaLity \ ^J*£ B %2%rS&- 

A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

141 FEDERAL ST., BOSTON 



Shop 15 i-* North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Wil. R.ce,ve Prompt Attention 



THE AMHERST 

FDRNITDREand CARPET STORE 

A COMPI.KTK LINK OF OOOD8 
8UITBD TO THB STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Ruga, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1881. 

EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NKVV YORK. 

IMPOKTKKB AM1> MAMUKACTUKKKS OK 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY QOOIDS. 

We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 

E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - . Amhkhst, Mass. 



LET 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



LEW 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 
M. A. C. TRADE. 
15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

GERARD. N. LENA/. 

19 PLEASANT ST. REAR HENRY FISH'S STORE. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKE. MASS. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 
College Stationery. 

Boston, New York, Springfield and Worcester 
Papers. All the Magazines. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER £ CO. 






AttHftSf , Aa«, 









THE>^ 



flfoassacbusetts 
Bgricultural 

Collcae 



AMD 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF ROSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFER 



— ♦ 



rnl I FCE COURSE:— Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. Admission 
™Sd on certificate from approved high schools and academies, or by examination 
SETof first two years largely required; elective courses offered during las two £«ta 
General Agriculture.Farm Management, Animal Husbandry, Da ir y,ng, General Hort^lture, 
Pomology Floriculture, Arboriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardenmg BoUny, 
IZZlry Science, Entomology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Civil Engmeenng, Zoology, 
English, Modern Languages, Agricultural Education, Economics, etc. 

r RADUATE SCHOOL:— Furnishes an excellent opportunity for graduates of this 
or othlVcolleges of standing, to take advanced courses in Agriculture, Botany, Chemistry 
EnX and Horticulture, leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 

Philosophy. 

, HnoT rOURSES :-\V-kter Schooi. of AoRiCDLTUBii-Short prsctical courses 
in aSL and Horticulture, begiuuiug the first Tuesday is January and continuing ; ten 
.eelf. Applicaut. must be at least eighteen year, of age and furn..b evtdence of good 
moral character. No entrance examination required. 

Scmmk School o» Agb.cctur. :-This is intended in part to reach teacher, "ho w.sh to 
J^Lce some form of Agricultural Instruction into the public schools. It .. p.rt.cul.ry 
u.cWWbT g b«hoo!te«bers of science or those -ho arc planning to teach agr.cn tore jn 
ht»h Ictoo U There are course, .lso especislly .d.pted to clergymen and other rural »o..l 
™ k .t. Include, practical cour.es in Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, Hort.cn.tnrc, Gar- 
dening, Fruit growing, etc. 

Unclassified students will be admitted, under certain restrictions, after September, 1909. 

Tuition Free to citizens of the United States. 

Necessary expenses moderate. 

Enffi^T ^* the pre-ident, K.,™ L. B«— .. Amherst, M..s. 
Next college year opens September 15, 190*. 



r 



THE COILE&E SIGNAL 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



VOL.. 19 



NO. 17 




! 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS., JUNE 22, 1909 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



lOUWmMili Do „ cc , niumni 



AMHKHST DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Amherst ami Northampton on the hour ami 
half bourlron. 6.30 am. till 1030 P.M. Sunday* the first car 
will leave at 8.80 a. m. ». ... 

will leave* ^^ OKKICK, GREENFIELD, MA8B. 
John A.TaKKart, Sunt. 
Northampton okkke, 103 Main St. 
C.W.Clapp.Asst.Supt^ Telephone, Northampton. M5-M . 

iDon't Walk on your Heels 

To Haw your sole. Come to me tor your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

opposite Town Hall. 



Amherst & Wand Street Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amheret. 



Don't miss this opportunity to get 
views of the college. 

10 of the best 5x7 Photos, $1 .00 
10 8x10 Photos, $2.00 



Address, Waldo D. Barlow, 1909. 

Amherst, Mass. 



M . A. C. BANNERS 



3 ft. by 6 ft., 



$4.00 



Just the right size for a room. 
Also a full line of smaller banners and pennants. 



Ol£UJ£I^» »RUO STORE 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Noktiiamiton. 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day. 
Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted for lit excellent 

Oyster Stew ami Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. M. to 4 A. M. 



DENTAL ROOMS, 



i'I'TI. Kit's BLOCK, 



AMIIKKST, MA 88 



W. W. BOYNTON. 

manufacturer or 

SODA WATERS, 

I'lneappie. Union and German Tonic, Birch Heer and (iiriK»*> 

Ale. Fountain* charged to order 



Kivkb Street, 



Northampton, Mass 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



E. B. IJICKINSDN, D. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS 

WILLIAMS- HI.UCK, AMIIKItST, M fcj| 

ofhik Room: 

9 to 12 -a., m., 1-30 to 6 p. m_ 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp-to-Date. 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or oil. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. II. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 

AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY" 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



M.A.O. AAf't, 



Oa H.WBIIH, •«>!» 



Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

I^tSATISFAOTION »TJ.A.RA»*T:EIEr>.«>irr t 
IT. A. VTLEY, Managrr. 

ohm. : 

T"!.-),Bt Pleasant Street. 

Vuiir Watch will keep time if repaired by 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

WATCH MAKER 



1 1 Amity St., 



Amherst, Mass. 



Mainsprings, I year f 

Cleaning, fl.oo 

1'rompt reliable work at I.owsst Prices. 



The Children are Happjr. 

Because rneir clothes are made on the New Home hewino 
Machine, which fact, assures them of no "rips." Mutlnre 
shook) i?et one at once as it will do for their chili) ren in years 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



1 



' 



W HITE FI.ANXEI. TKOUSKKS, 

SOFT «FIH*T 

(With The Collars) 

IN AN ENDLESS VARIETY. 



»■-* ^.--» 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



GO TO .... 



page's SDoe Store 



Next to Post Office. 



LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 




E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
VlOIilfl, BRflJO, IBfUWDOIilH, GUITAR STRINGS. 

OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



WORLD-WIDE DISTRIBUTION 

There is no mistaking the superiority of a type- 
writer that, in 17 years, has built up a market in 
every part of the civilized world. This internation- 
al endorsement of 

THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

proves our right to offer it to you as the world's 
best typewriter. Write us or any Smith Premier 
branch for a detailed description of its advantages. 
THE SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER CO. 
i 9 o Pearl St, - - Hartford, Conn. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 
M. A. C. Pennants and Pins. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bringyour Pictures to us to be 
Framed. 

We have started a Circulating Library. Have all 
the latest books of Fiction. 



COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE. 



AMHERST FARMS and VILLAGE HOMES 
FOR SALE. 

Over 100 good bargains listed within a short 
distance of the center of the town. 

W, R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIX. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNE 22. 1909 



NO. 17 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Student! and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication! should be addressed Coix.oa S.ohai | mm „ 'ii' , T c 
sen, ,0 aii subscriber, until it. discontinuance I. ordered and arrears are paid. Sub^b.™ whTi no. receiC. th^r Ln^ ZZ "' 

notify the Business Manager. ouo.cr.oers wno do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 



BOARD OF BDITOKS 

WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910. Editor-in-Chief. 
E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911. Assistant Business Manager 

HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. Acting Editor-in-Edltor. LOUIS C HROu/n iom a.v., 

Indian r koi com .oin ai , v. . LUUla ^ HROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

JUtslAH U hOLSOM, 1910, Alumni Notes. PARK w inpu ,a, ■ r^ 

ARTHUR H quippp iqii /- ,, ki . r-AKK w. ALLEN, 1911, Department Notes. 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE, 1911, College Notes. HERBERT W. BLANEY. I9M, Spe. ial 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. Circulation Department. 

ALBERT W. DODCE. 1912. Circulation Department. 

Terms ; $i.oo par near in adcance. Single Copies, lOe. 



Postage ontaide of United States and Canada, Xsc. extra. 



The Union. 
Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Base- Ball Association. 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 
H. W. Turner, Pres. College Senate, 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
R. H. Allen. Manager. 
E. J. Burke. Manage!. 
R. S. Eddy, Manager. 
L. C. Schermerhorn. Manager. 



Fraternity Conference. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index 

Y. M. C A 

Musical Association. 
Tennis Association, 



O. C. Bartlett. President. 
R. C. Lindblsd. Pres. 
H. W. Blaney. Manager. 
F. T. Haynes. Pres. 
L. S. Dickinson, Manager. 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 
Mmmim \ asaaaaaav name. 



Edi-tbriaJs. 



With the presentation of "The Toastmaster" by 
the Junior Class a good start has been made toward 
a future college dramatics club. The committee 
worked hard to make the show a success and they 
certainly succeeded. To Dickinson, Waldron and 
Schermerhorn are the thanks of those who saw the 
entertainment especially due, for they took the matter 
in hand and it is to their untiring efforts that the 
success was brought about. 



asked to co-operate with President Butterfield and re- 
turn as much information as possible. 



The President of the college wishes to get in closer 
touch with all graduates and persons who have ever 
attended M. A. C. for any extent of time. During 
the summer a circular will be sent to all such persons 
with the request that it be filled out at once and re- 
turned. These blanks will be properly filed away, 
and in this way a fairly accurate record of the alumni 
and past students can be had. The Alumni are 



The recent decision of the student body to stand 
behind the Skjnal Board in their efforts to put the 
paper on a better news basis, is extremely encour- 
aging for the new life of the college. The students' 
decision was to raise the subscription price of the 
Sicnal from $1 to $1.50 in order to have a weekly 
paper, full of college news. For the past two years 
the Board has been handicapped by the lack of space 
and money. News becomes old. The Signal has 
not appealed to the student body because of this. 
The right kind of interesting news had to be crowded 
out to make room for the space required for routine 
news. Editorials were not forthcoming. Why? A 
ten days' old baseball game must take their place. 
Information that is of live interest to both student 
body and the alumni could not be made use of. 
It seemed to the Signal Board that the time was 
ripe for a weekly paper and at a recent mass meeting 



1 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



199 





IThe game was almost 
ZZ»Zl 'men— error! 0, «- «M 
malting awaUt-over for us. The hitting on both 
■ >— -*— I hv Training 



order to mane una •»«• 

,t ls very true the financial aid but we also want 
advice "and suggestion from the alumni. On every 
hand the college activities are growing 



"des was weak, oni, live being gathered b, Tra.nlng 
School and slab, our men. Hubbard fanned eleven 
„d was teady a, a.l times. The .Irs, two 



ing this matter will be sent to each alum McCu i loch wa iked. Keys 



the summer. 



/Uhletic •*<>*«• 



BASEBALL. 

M A. d 1°; MlDDLEBURY. I. 

Our ball 'team had an easy time with Middlebury 
Monday May 24, defeattng them 10-1 in six inmngs 
T^op hers were used b, the home aggregation ^and 
Ided seven hits, while Williams kept the Vermont 
h„s down to three. The eight errors of the home 
Jam were also productive o, runs, six of which came 
He las, inning. Smith and Coleman did the star 
acts In the field. 



The score: — 



Thayer l. 
Tilton, 3b., 
Smith, 2b.. 
Hubbard, lb., 
O'Grady. c. f., 
Warner, r., 
French, c. 
Williams, p., 
Bean, s., 

Total, 



Oleaaon. P., 
Beane. 2b.. 
Breits't, r., 
Goode. c. 
Rock. lb.. 
Coleman, c. f., 
Ross. 3b., 
Barnes, s.. 
Wray. 1. P-. 



M. A. C. 

R. 

2 
1 
I 
2 
I 



2 
I 

10 

MIDDLEBURY. 

R. 











1 



M. 

I 

2 
1 




1 

5 

I 



H. 



1 



1 






1 



Total, 



P.O. 

1 
I 
2 

8 
I 


5 



18 



P.O. 

I 
1 

2 
5 
5 
1 

2 
1 

18 



wltn a nil y«st *«...— . 

McCuiloch walked. Keys sacrificed, but Brock fanned. 
For M. A, C. Thayer walked, Tilton reached f st 
on Brock's fumbles, Smith hit through short, Hub- 
bard squeezed Thayer in, O'Grady was safe on 
Brocks second error. Warner doubled to left and 
stole third, French sacrificed him home Hosmer 
fl ,ed out to Ensinon. F.ve runs. Second : After 
Moller had reached first base through Bean's fumble 
H bard fanned three men. Bean was hit. and took 
second on a passed ball. Thayer put him on third 
and Tilton tried to squeeze him, but was safe on 
Winter's throw. McCuiloch fumbled Smith s rap. 
Hubbard singled to right, scoring two men. bu was 
nipped off first when Bradshaw threw O'Crady s fly 
to first Eight runs. Another was added in the 
„ on a! error, and two hit. In the seventh 
Springfield put a man across the plate on two hits and 
an out. 



o 







6 




4 

1 

1 









2 





The score 



Thayer. LI., 
Tilton. 3b.. 
Smith. 2b., 
Hubbard, p.. 
O'Crady. c.f- 
Warner, r.f., 
French, c 
Hosmer, lb. 
Bean, s.s., 
Ackerman, 
Total, 



m. a. C. 



A.B. 



3 
4 
5 

2 
3 

4 
3 
4 
1 
t 

30 



1 

2 

2 


1 
1 

1 
1 




1 

I 

2 

1 



I 











Bradshaw, l.f- 
, Winter, lb.. 
8 8 McCuiloch, s.s.. 

Keys. 3b.. 
First base Brock. 2b., 



-> * r 'ctmrk out— by Gleason 3. by Wil- 1 Moller. c.f. 
on btus-off Wray 1 . «£»££; §£dt f m itl Williams. Hit by Eri.mon, r.f 

liams 5. Sacrifice h its r£?tX hvWrav Wild pitch-Wray. Umpire p, w , c. 
oUched ball-Hubbard and O Grady by Wray. v Gwlllow, p 

" «... m» nirWinson. 



-Rev. Mr. Dickinson 

M. A. &. 9; S. T. S.. 1. 
The Springfield game on the campus May 28, was 



S. T. S. 

A.». 

5 

4 
3 
2 

4 
4 
4 
4 
3 

33 










1 





I 



2 

1 


1 
1 





P.O. 

1 



1 


3 

11 
11 



27 



P.O. 

I 
13 
3 

2 
1 
1 
3 


24 



A, 




7 


3 

1 


11 










2 
1 




1 
I 

3 
3 
1 
1 


1 

4 

15 





1 

2 

1 

2 







1 



sSE. Mt-Th.y.r TUton, H"^d French K.ys^ S.o^ba.es 
-Warner 3, Tilton. O Grady 2 ^- ° , g^ w 4. Hit by pitched ball 
Smith. Struck out-b^HubUrd l^^^-Moller to McCuiloch. 
SwK' TimUh. Umpirs-Foley. 



Dartmouth, 7; M. A. C, 5. 

Dartmouth defeated our team on the ball grounds 
in Hanover on June second. Up to the sixth it looked 
like a victory for us, but the long journey to Hanover 
told on our team, and Williams weakened, four runs 
being made by Dartmouth in the sixth. Hubbard 
replaced him, and allowed only one hit. The Green 
also used two pitchers, Ganley retiring during the 
fourth and Ekstrom holding us to one hit for the 
remainder of the game. The fielding of the home 
team was very poor, eight errors being their total, 
mostly on easy chances. They attempted to atone 
for this weakness by resorting to unsportsmanlike 
work, such as knocking or kicking the ball from the 
hands of our basemen. These tactics however gained 
them nothing, for the umpire was awake and vigilant. 

The game started with an error by Orr. Tilton 
bunted and beat it to first. Smith advanced both 
men by sacrificing, Orr to Brady. Hubbard scored 
both by a long drive to center on which he reached 
the third corner. He stayed there, for O 'Grady 
struck out, and Ackerman rolled one to Brady. 
Dartmouth came back In her half and tied the score. 
After Orr had tapped one to Williams, Schildmiller 
trippled to left. Ackerman threw out Brady holding 
the runner at third. Hubbard let Daly's grounder get 
by him, Schildmiller scoring. Daly stole, and scored 
when Emerson hit to short right. The French-Smith 
combination caught the latter at the middle station ; 
Score, 2-2. 

French was robbed of a hit by Brady's lucky catch 
of his liner. Williams hit safely over second, Hosmer 
fanned, and Warner got a scratch hit through Orr. 
Tilton walked, and the bases were full, but Orr and 
Brady handled Smith's attempt. Dartmouth secured 
a hit and a stolen base after two were out, but Ganley's 
strike-out stopped any possible runs. 

Third inning : after Hubbard was retired on his 
grounder to Brady, O'Grady hit a hard one that Eaton 
could just reach and hold, but could not get to first 
fast enough. Ackerman foul flied to Chadbourne. 
French hit to short right taking second when Schild- 
miller let the ball go past him, O'Grady came in on 
the play Conroy fumbled William's grounder, but 
recovered it in time to throw to third and get French 
who had overrun the base on a misunderstanding of 



the coaching. Very little doing for Dartmouth 
although Schildmiller hit safely over second. His 
attempt at reaching second was frustrated by French 
and Smith again. Score; 3-2 In our favor. 

Fourth inning : Hosmer struck out, but Warner 
hit to right field. Tilton hit to right, and went along 
to second when Schildmiller failed to stop the ball. 
Norton replaced Orr at this time. Smith's high fly 
was taken by Eaton, who threw the ball to the third 
bag to catch Warner off, but the base was not cov- 
ered, and Warner went home, and Tilton to third. 
A moment later Eaton made a low throw of Hub- 
bard's grounder, and Tilton tallied. Norton retired 
O'Grady. Dartmouth was easy, only three men 
going to bat. score ; 5-2. 

Fifth inning : Ekstrom pitching for Dartmouth. 
Ackerman was safe when Schildmiller made his third 
error, but was forced by French, who went to second 
when Williams struck out. Hosmer was third out. 
Eaton hit to left, and stole. Conroy struck out. 
Ekstrom grounded to Ackerman, Eaton taking third, 
whence he scored when Norton hit over second base. 
Norton stole the base, but was left when Schildmiller 
flied out to O'Grady. Score ; 5-3 in our favor. 

Sixth Inning : One, two, three for us. For Dart- 
mouth it was a very busy session, overcoming our 
lead and giving them one which they kept. Brady 
got to second on Ackerman's fumble and his own 
steal. Daly out to O'Grady, who held Brady to his 
base. Emerson hit a short fly to right, Brady taking 
third. Chadbourne fanned, but Eaton's line drive to 
left scored Brady. Conroy hit to Center, and Emer- 
son scored, Eaton taking third. Conroy stole. Both 
scored when Warner lost Ekstrom's high fly in the 
sun. Warner retired Norton. Score; 7-5 for 
Dartmouth. 

Seventh inning- O'Grady reached first on Brady's 
error, but got no further. With Hubbard in the box, 
Dartmouth did no better, in fact, not as well, for 
only three of her players went to bat. 

Eighth inning : After French had dropped Emer- 
son's foul fly, the latter hit through the box, and stole 
second. Two men fanned, one walked, and the third 
out was on a fly to Tilton. 

Ninth inning : Smith flied to center. Hubbard hit 
a slow roller to Conroy and was safe. O'Grady forced 



f 



200 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



him, and Ackerman fanned, 
of Dartmouth. 



Scored ; 7-5 in favor 



The score: — 



Orr, 2b.. 
Norton. 2b., 
Schlldmlll.r. r.I. 
Brady, lb.. 
Daley, c.f.. 
Emerson, 1 f.. 
Chadbourne, c 
Eaton, 3b., 
Conroy ».- 
Ganley, p.. 
Ekstrom. p.. 

Total, 



Warner, l.f.. 
Tllion. 3b., 
Smith, 2b. 
Hubbard .lb. 
O'Crady. c.f. 
Ackerman, s. 
French, c. 
Wllllama. p., r.f. 



DARTMOUTH. 
A.B. R. 



2 
2 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
I 



36 







I 

1 

1 

1 



2 

I 







M. A. C. 
A.B. 

4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 

39 



2 

2 





1 













1 

2 


3 

2 
2 

I 

1 1 



2 
2 

2 
1 


1 

I 




P.O. 


2 

II 
1 
1 

9 
2 
1 




27 



1 

I 

2 

7 

2 



9 



2 

24 



2 

4 



I 







2 

3 





12 





2 


3 
2 
2 




into right and the ball got by Williams allowing him 
to reach second and score Mahoney and Sweeney. 
Mahoney could not connect with Hubbard's curves 
and made the third out. 

No scoring was done again until the fifth. Whalen 
fanned, J. Mahoney hit a hard ball to Hosmer which 
glanced off his glove and he reached second and went 
to third when D. Mahoney hit to Tilton who held the 
ball too long. He stole second. Craig singled, scor- 
ing j Mahoney. Jones filed to Smith who threw D. 
Mahoney out at second for a double play ending the 

scoring. 

The score : — 



Hosmer, r.f., lb,. 
Total. 

»«^ir«gfr M ^mys^ *» Hu r b a bi y rd ra 

Emeraon. Eaton. Conroy 2. Hit» «' J^"J~™ . Hubbard 1 Hit by 
—2 hours. 



D. Mahoney, 3b., 
Craig, s.s., 
Jones. 2b.. 
Sweeney, c. 
Kearney, lb., 
S. Mahoney, t.f., 
Harrington, r.f., 
Whalen. c.f.. 
J. Mahoney. p.. 

Total. 



HOLY CBOSS. 
A.B. 



4 
2 
1 
3 



30 



M. A. C. 



We loose in fast came to Holy Cross. 
Our baseball team met defeat at the hands of the 
fast Holy Cross team in Worcester June 5. The 
game, according to the Worcester lelegram, which 
usually roasts our teams, was the best game put up by 
an Aggie team in a number of years. Holy Cross 
was favored by luck in the first inning and started 
with a lead which would have been hard for any team 
to overcome on Fitton field. Both teams were 
credited with a fast double play apiece. French 
caught at his best although he allowed two of Hub- 
bard's curves to get by him with men on the bases, 
but no scores resulted. Hubbard pitched a masterly 
game and kept the heavy batting Holy Cross team 
down with only five hits. Capt. O'Grady made two 
hard catches. For Holy Cross Jones featured with a 
catch of a long drive by Hubbard. 

Holy Cross scored twice in the initial inning when 
D. Mahoney drove a fast single over second base, and 
then stole second. Craig filed out to O'Grady. 
Jones was retired at first by Ackerman's fast throw 
on a hard hit ball, and Mahoney went to third on Hub- 
bard's error of Sweney's grounder. Keaney singled 



Warner, l.f.. 
Tilton, 3b.. 
Smith. 2b., 
Hubbard, p., 
O'Crady. c,f.. 
Ackerman, a.s. 
French. C, 
Williams, r.f., 



Total. 



2 
2 

4 
4 
3 
4 
1 
3 

28 



I 
1 



I 

I 








1 
I 












P.O. 


4 
1 

3 
13 
1 
2 
2 


27 



P.O. 

I 



4 

2 
2 

4 
2 



3 
3 
3 
1 





7 

17 




2 
3 
2 

I 
1 











i 



I 





1 



1 





1 



27 



Ru'nTrnade-D. Mahoney .Sweeney J. Mahoney. Sac rifle. h.t.-T.l- 
«on. Stolen bases-O'Grady .Warner, ^.honey ^. wna. 
base on balls-Harrington. Whaler ,2 £ arn %^ n- 'rouble plays 

French 2 Hit by pitched ball-Tllton. Time- lh. 45m. 

Andover, 2; M. A. C, 1. 

Our game with Andover was closely contested 
throughout and it was not until the eighth inning that 
Andover scored. Then, wtth Pfau on base, Bennett 
drove a home run hit to left, winning the game. We 
had previously scored one run in the sixth inning. 

The score : — 

PHILLIPS-AMDOVEK. 



Bennett, 2b., 
E. Burdette. s.s., 
Snell, c. 
Wright, rf.. 
L. Burdette, lb.. 
Rellly, 3b., 
Brown, v., 
Reynolds, l.f.. 
Pfau, l.f.. 
Thompson, c.f.. 

Total, 



3 

1 



2 















P.O. 

2 
3 
7 

11 
I 
1 


I 
I 

27 



2 
2 

1 







2 











I 









I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



20I 



Thajr.r, c.f.. 
Tilton. 3b . 
Smith. 2h.. 
Hubbard, lb„ 
O'Crady, If., 
Ackerman. r.f., 
French, c. 
Williams, p.. 
Bean, s.s.. 



I 


I 
I 
I 
1 







P.O. 

I 

2 

2 
4 
2 

9 
3 
1 




I 







4 



1 




Toul 5 24 6 I 

a R . uns r.. m * d "~ b , y P, » Ul Bennett. Thayer. Two-base hlts-E. Bur- 
dette. Thayer Home run-Bennett. Stolen base-Ackerman. Base on 
balls-^ff Williams Struck out-by Brown 6. by Williams 7. Sacrifice 
;l iTi ho . m ,P» on 'TUton. Double play-Tllton and Williams. Hit by 
Pitched balU-Pf,u E^ Burdette. Paaaed ball-French. Umplre- 
Whltney. Time— lh. 50m. 



TENNIS. 

On June I , the tennis team lost to Bowdoin Col- 
lege at Brunswick, Me., both the singles and doubles. 
Only one match went three sets, but these results 
should not discourage the followers of the game here, 
for Bowdoin possesses the Maine champions in both 
singles and doubles. 

On June 2 and 3 the team broke even in their 
tournament with Bates, at Lewiston. Rockwood and 
Webb fairly outplayed their opponents in two double 
matches and Rockwood also played good in his match 
of singles. 

The score : — 

M. A. C. 

DOUBLES. 

Rockwood and Webb, defeated Boothby and 
Wadlelgh of Bates 6-4. 6-3. 

Jackson and Peterson, Bates, defeated Johnson 
and Thomas, M. A. C, 8-6, 6-4. 

Rockwood and Webb, M. A. C, defeated Bolster 
and Quimby, Bates, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. 

SINGLeS. 

Wadleigh, Bates, defeated Webb, M. A. C, 5 4. 
6-3. 

Rockwood, M. A. C, defeated Boothby, Bates, 
6-2, 2-6, 6-4. 

Jackson, Bates, defeated Johnson, M. A. C, 
2-6. 6-1, 7-5. 

The tournament with Springfield Tranlng School 
for June 5, was cancelled, this being the second time 
that rain has interferred. 

There are good prospects of producing a better 
team for next year, but they would be much brighter 
if we could have better courts to play on. 



The 1910 members of the senate have been appoint 
ed a committee by the Class of 1910 to look into the 
feasibility of forming a new governing body, one that 
will better represent the students. 

At a recent meeting of the baseball association H. 
W. French, '10, was elected captain of next year's 
team. C. A. Lodge, 'II, manager, and W. J. Bird- 
sail, '12, L. E. Fagerstrom, '12, and H. H. Wood, 
'12, to run for the assistant managership. 

Prof. A. V. Osmun of the Department of Botany 
has offered a prize of $5 to that member of the 
Freshman class doing the best work in Freshman 
Botany. The winner will be announced at the Com- 
mencement Exercises on Wednesday. 

The College Senate, the student governing body, 
have met and organized as follows: — President, W. 

E. Leonard; Vice President, F. T. Haynes; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, A. P. Bursley. The members 
of the Senate for 1909 10 are '10; W. E. Leonard, 

F. T. Haynes, H. A. Brooks, W. R. Clarke, and 
H. T. Cowles. From 1911; H. W. Blaney, P. W. 
Allen. A. P. Bursley, and P. W. Pickard. 

M. A. C. Takes Second Place at the Intercollegiate 
Rifle Match at Sea Girt, N. J. When there was a 
difference of only one point at the end of the second 
stage of the intercollegiate rifle match on the State 
rifle range at Sea Girt, it was evident that the match 
would be stubbornly fought out at 500 yards. It was 
won finally by the team from George Washington 
University, which had a score of 738 and 900. 

The team from the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, which was second with a score of 720, filed a 
protest on the ground that H. E. Skinner, who shot 
on the team making the highest score, was a post- 
graduate, and not an undergraduate. 
The field range scores follow : 





200 


300 


500 


Total. 


George Washington, 


232 


239 


267 


738 


Massachusetts A. C, 


224 


246 


250 


720 


Columbia. 


233 


232 


242 


707 


Pennsylvania, 


222 


233 


233 


688 


Delaware College, 


228 


221 


204 


653 



r* 




202 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



REPORT OF BASKET BALL ASSOCIATION) for the benefit of the junior Class of the Petersham 

Agricultural High School. 

The cast was coached by Mr. James K. M.Us. 
•77 of Amherst. Between the acts a Northampton 



FOR SEASON OF 1909- 

RECEIPTS. 

Apportionment, $ 300 °° 

Guarantees, 158 °° 

Gate Receipts, 34 55 

Total, 

EXPENDITURES. 

Athletic Supplies and Sweaters, 
Williams, Holy Cross Trips, 

Dartmouth, Springfield T. S 
Guarantees, 
Printing, 
Dining Hall, 

Telephone and Telegraph, 
Referees, 
Coach, 

Postage and Carfare, 
New Baskets and Repairs, 
Miscellaneous, 



$492 55 



orchestra furnished music and L. Brandt, MO, a 
vocal solo. Waldron, '10, was business manager 
and L. S. Dickinson, '10, was stage manager. 
The cast : 






126 08 

88 00 
15 25 
11 50 
2 36 
7 00 
7 75 
6 52 

5 50 

6 71 



Bill Morgan, 

Tom Fairfax, 

Bob Kenmark, 

Henry Reed, 

Tom Ripley. 
George Macintosh, 
Professor Reed, 
Mrs. Reed, 
Cynthia Reed, 
Buzzer Reed, 



W. E. Leonard 
R. A. Waldron 
E. F. Damon 
R. S. Eddy 
H. W. Cowles 
J. P. Blaney 
E. H. Turner 
H. A. Brooks 
Miss C. G. Roy 
S. C. Brooks 



Total, 

Total Receipts, 
Total Expenditures, 

Balance, 

Respectfully submitted. 

Approved, 

John N. Summers, 
Auditor. 



$379 85 

$492 55 
379 85 



$112 70 



R. C. Lindblad, 
Manager. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE RIFLE SHOOT 

The following team represented the college at the 
outdoor shoot of the Intercollegiate Rifle Association 
of America held at Sea Girt June 18 and 19:- 
George Paulsen MO, Alden C. Brett '12, Frederick 
A. McLaughlin '11, P. A. Racicott '11, A. H. 
Sharpe ' 1 1 , and L. 0. Stevenson '11. 

In competition for the outdoor rifle medals to be 
given by the Military Department for the best scores 
made at the 200, 300, and 500 yard ranges. P. A. 
Racicot'll won first place, L. O. Stevenson '11 
second and G. Paulsen '10 third. The medals will 
be awarded at the Commencement Drill. 



"THE TOASTMASTER." 

In connection with the commencement week exer- 
cises the Junior Class on Friday evening, June 18, 
presented "The Toastmaster," In the Town Hall. 
-The Toastmaster" is a three-act comedy dealing 
with college life, the scene being laid in Amherst at 
the time when 1910 were Freshmen. Two other 
performances of the play had been given previous to 
the one of Friday evening; It was given June 28 at 
Montague under the auspices of the High School, 
Athletic Association, and at Petersham on June 4, | 



FLINT ORATIONS. 

At assembly hour on May 26, the annual Flint 
oratorical exhibition was held In the Chapel, 
program : — 



The 



MUSIC. 



Belmont. 



William Edward Leonard, 

Theodore Roosevelt. 
Willard McCready Titus, New Braintree. 

The Young Citizen. 

Myron Smith Hazen. Springfield. 

The No- License Question. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



203 



MUSIC. 

William Clarence Johnson, South Framlngham. 

General Custer. 
Arthur Witt Holland, Shrewsbury. 

The Duty of a College Man. 

Roger Sherman Eddy, Boston. 

Capital Punishment. 

MUSIC. 



BURNHAM PRIZE SPEAKING. 

The Burnham prize speaking contest was held in 
the Chapel on the afternoon of June 2, the program 
was as follows: — 

Music. 

William Richard Bent, Marlboro. 

Massachusetts and South Carolina (Daniel Webster). 
John Francis Dee, Worcester. 

Toussaint L'Ouverture (Wendell Phillips). 
Frank Leonard Gray. East Boston. 

The Victor of Marengo (James T. Headley). 

Frank Burrows Hills, Bernardston. 

The Last Combat (Lord Lyton). 

Music. 

Donald Charles Maxon, Elkhart, Indiana. 

Irish Aliens and English Victories (Richard Lalor Sheil). 
Theodore Joseph Moreau. Turners Falls. 

The Honor of the Woods (Anonymous). 
Herbert James Stack, Amherst. 

A Call to Action (Patrick Henry). 

Edward Burnham Young, Dorchester. 

Napoleon the Little (Victor Hugo). 

Music. 



LIMITATIONS. 

BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS, JUNE 20, 1909, 
by President Kenyon L. Butter field. 
One of the great characters of history, standing 
like a towering butte among the hills of the desert, 
is the rugged figure of John the Baptist. His 
noblest utterance, revealing at once his insight and 
his generosity, was spoken to an inner circle of friends, 



in explanation of his eclipse by that Prophet whose 
sandals he was not worthy to unloose and of whom 
he said 1 "He must increase, but I must decrease." 
It is a great trial to a strong man to find himself 
hedged about by limitations of time or circum- 
stances or talent, unable to achieve the heights to 
which he has aspired, obliged to build his nest on the 
lower ledges of the cliff, instead of upon the topmost 
crags where 

"The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls." 
Yet here was a man of power who appreciated his 
own limitations in the shadow of a far greater figure, 
and who generously acknowledged the fact. 

There is tied up in this utterance of the Baptist's 
a homely but valuable lesson — the law of human limi- 
tations. At first thought, it seems quite superfluous 
to discuss such a theme as the restrictions that fence 
us in. No truth is more obvious than that our lives 
are bounded on all sides by high walls. As a piece 
of philosophy, the Idea of limitations is mere plati- 
tude. As a practical matter, however, there lies In 
this idea, I believe, a deal of hard sense for men 
who have put the last rivets into their armor and are 
ready for the tournament of life. 

There is no difficulty in making a list of human 
limitations, and it is unnecessary to recite the dis- 
couragingly long catalog. However, partly for sake 
of illustration, and partly to discover if possible 
some conditions of our lives that are significant, we 
may name a few of our limitations. They divide 
themselves rather roughly into three main groups: 

Those general human limitations that apply univer- 
sally. 

Those limitations that perhaps apply to all men, 
but which have a marked Individuality; that is, dif- 
ferent men have widely differing powers both in quality 
and in extent. 

Those limitations which are allowed to persist In 
one's character and by which a man Is held back 
from his birthright of spiritual freedom and growth. 

Among those general human limitations that apply 
to all men, are such restrictions tor example as that 
of time. To the youth, a long road stretches out 
ahead, the plain path narrowing until it Is lost to the 
eye ; the impression is one of endless time — and 
many a young man acts apparently on the theory that 



204 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









tomorrow is to last forever. But if we soberly meas- 
ure the course, we will find that when we have elimi- 
nated the time for sleep, for exercise, for recreation, 
and add up the hours which may be devoted to pro- 
ductive toll, the sum is pitifully small. It has been 
remarked that not over one-fifth of a man's breathing 
hours are available for work. A wasted hour be- 
comes precious in the light of such mathematics. 

There are also the limitations of seasons. The 
wise man said, "To everything there is a season 
and a time to every purpose under the heavens." 
There are limitations of age and limitations of youth. 
"Thou shall drink at twightlight of that fountain which 
was sealed to thee at dawn. " And is it not remarka- 
ble that youth, with its inexperience, its hot blood, its 
impulsiveness, makes the great decisions of life? It 
is in these years that a man decides upon his voca- 
tion, chooses his wife, subscribes to his political party, 
and assumes his attitude toward religion. These are 
the fundamental choices of life, determining a man's 
work, his intimate family relations, his attitude as 
a citizen, and the development of his moral and 
spiritual being. They are all choices made under 
the limitations of comparative inexperience. In fact, 
they are not always rational; but they are Inevitable. 
To every one there are limitations o f memory, of 
knowledge, of experience, and so on through the long 
list. All these limitations are inexorable. We may 
beat our wings against the bars if we will, but we 
cannot escape. 

There is moreover, another and an inner wall of 
limitations that doth hedge us in. We are all subject 
to large, general restrictions such as those just men- 
tioned, but there are other restrictions that apply to 
all. though in a peculiar and different way to different 
individuals. These are the hardest to recognize, and 
sometimes the hardest to endure with patience. One 
has, for example no choice of the age in which he 
lives, or his place in society, of his human relation- 
ships. One cannot pick out his own grandfather, de- 
sirable as may be the opportunity for that choice. He 
cannot determine the stage on which he plays his 
part; one's soul is wafted into port from the boundless 
deeps of mystery, by winds that blow whence they will. 
The New England lad who grew to manhood during 
the decade just preceding the civil war, filled as it 



was with the atmosphere of high idealism, pontic fer- 
vor, patriotic fire, came to his powers amid influences 
vastly different from those which surrounded the boy- 
hood of some obscure Russian peasan- of the period. 
The poor boy has limitations in his opportunities 
for culture, sometimes for refinement, for travel, 
for association with noted people. The son of 
the rich man has such limitations as lack of incen- 
tive to action, the enervating influence of ease, the 
temptations of luxury. 

The city boy becomes sophisticated, alert, "wise 
in the wisdom of the street, often also wise in the 
foolishness of the gutter. The farm-born lad certain- 
ly has limitations of opportunity and experience; yet 
he possesses invaluable "knowledge never learned of 

schools." 

Each person has his own peculiar physical powers 
and limitations. Some men are tireless; others 
must rest frequently. Napoleon often slept only 
four hours in a day. Darwin could rarely work four 
hours in a day. Some men are prone to worry; 
others don't worry enough-I have seen college 
students who. I thought, suffered under the last named 

limitation. 

So, too. there are limitations of opportunity. Have 
we a right" to say that "Smith and Jones" might not 
make as able governors as Folk and Johnson? Would 
Grant and Lincoln have found their present niche in 
the hall of fame had they been born a few years later 
than they were ? I have met men who think that 
General Thomas, the "Rock of Chickamauga," was 
the ablest general on the northern side in our civil 
war, but that he never was given the gre. t chance 
because he was by birth a Virginian. 

The third group of limitations is so important that 
before preceding to discuss it I wish to make a few 
practical suggestions about our attitude towards those 
kinds of limitations already mentioned. 

Let us recognize, first of all, that the law of limita- 
tions is God's universal law. The bloom of the 
maize scarcely rivals the rose, yet corn is extremely 
useful to mankind. The Percheron horse cannot win 
in a race with the Thoroughbred, though its value for 
practical purposes will hardly be disputed. It is 
senseless to "kick against the goads" of circum- 
stances that clearly limit our talents or opportunities. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



205 




It is folly to envy another man his powers because I 
they are different from our own. If we once ac- ! 
cept our limitations we have won half the battle against 
them. 

Notice that a corollary of the law of limitations is 
that the restriction of the range of our powers actu- 
ally tends to the greatest usefulness. When you 
specialize a particular function, you develop most fully 
its efficiency. This truth is written into the whole 
history of biological evolution. It is equally evident 
in the evolution of human society. The efficient man 
narrows his field of operations, and brings to his work 
a special combination of personal qualities that give 
him peculiar power. 

So far we have dealt merely with those limitations 
that are objective, matters largely of environing con- 
ditions of time, space, circumstances. We have 
seen how inexorable they are, how we must recog- 
nize them, and yet how in a great measure we may 
triumph over them. We have not yet however 
touched the most difficult phase of our subject. We 
are also victims of limitations that reach the soul, 
and that are fundamental defects of character. There 
is not time to attempt a full searching of the heart of 
man. But I wish to mention two or three limita- 
tions of this kind that seem to me serious. They 
grow in part out of the simple fact of human imper- 
fection, and in part out of the peculiar tendences of 
our age. 

The first of these limitations is that of a lack of 
generosity. I fear that the average man thinks that 
he must be self-getting, rather than self giving. This 
whole idea of service, sacrifice, and unselfishness is. 
I am persuaded, quite largely misunderstood. The 
Master said that the man who gives up his life shall 
really gain his life. We are apt to interpret that as a 
very pleasant ideal, as a very high-minded thing, but 
one that really does not work. It may answer for the 
martyrs, for the great spirits of the world: it may 
answer for Sunday, but it won't endure the Monday 
wash. I wonder, looking a little deeper, if we shall 
not find a certain practical shrewdness in this saying 
of Jesus. How does a man win his way to the top 
in a great business house ? Does he do it by taking 
advantage of every opportunity to put in short time, to 
make his task easier for himself by avoiding all re- 
sponsibility that he can ? No ; he gains the confi- 



dence of his employers only by placing himself, or at 
least seeming to place himself unreservedly at their 
service, by seeming to be willing to give of his time, 
of his strength, unreservedly for their benefit— not for 
his,— in fact his willingness to sacrifice everything 
but his honor for their sakes. It is astonishing that, 
in the face of experience of thousands of men, there 
are still young men who fail to see that in the most 
practical concerns of life, it is the man who is gener- 
ous, unselfish, who "looses his life." that really wins 
the reward. 

As I measure men, the second serious limitation 
In our third group, which I observe, is the limitation 
of vision, combined with good hard sense, the lack of 
what might be called a workable dream. There are 
men a plenty who dream dreams, who see the large 
things to be done ; but they have no capacity for exe- 
cution—they have no sense of proportion- -they 
would prefer no bread to half a loaf -they don't know 
how to get things done. There are other men who 
are practical, energetic, forceful; but they can see 
only the immediate task at their feet. They are 
shortsighted with respect to the large interests of life— 
they cannot plan for the future. In our politics, in 
our business, even in the educational world, we are 
constantly suffering from the inferior work of men 
who are blind to the fundamental issues of life. This 
lack of vision in government matters distinguishes the 
mere politician from the statesman ; in business it 
differentiates the mere manager of operations from 
the constructive genius of a man like James J. Hill ; 
in education it separates the school keeper from men 
like Horace Mann in Massachusetts, and John D. 
Pierce in Michigan. Bear in mind that I am speak- 
ing of that type of seer, of the man with visions, 
who is not however visionary. We need the man 
who might be represented by a successful airship with 
an automobile running gear, so that it is equally at 
home on the land and in the air. We need the man 
who loves to climb to the mountain tops, but who is 
skillful in cultivating the plane. 

Closely allied to this lack of vision. Is a third limi- 
tation, the mention of which brings us to the very 
heart of our subject, and this is our lack of contact 
with the eternal things. We are constantly suffering 
from the cares and disappointments incident to the 
temporal and fleeting concerns of life. I fear some 






f 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




of us even get our inspirations chiefly from the things 
that are earthly and transient. I think we need to 
ask ourselves some rather fundamental questions at 
this point. Is there a God. or is their not ? Has 
this universe of matter and spirit come about by 
chance, or blind force ; or is it the product of a great 
underlying, all-pervasive intelligence? There are few 
todeny the existence of God. But if God does exist, is 
he an absentee God, merely a force or an intellect 
who has built the world and all that therein is and 
who has left it to run itself under His rigorous edicts; 
or is He in His universe, even now building as He 
has heretofore built; governing by law. but by law 
based on the largest love and law which is an expres- 
sion of an infinite mind and heart ? It Is heard to 
conceive of a God who is not In His world. If He 
is in His world, is it as a stranger to His creatures, 
unapproachable in His majesty, hedged by the cere- 
mony of an austere king ; or is He a loving Father, 
accessable to His children, "not far from every one 
of us?" The average human mind when face to 
face with these specific questions, almost invariably 
and instinctively chooses to believe in a God who is 
oresent in His universe and is accessible to human 
fellowship. So much for the logic. If « be legiti- 
mate reasoning, what a vista of power opens to our 
view Here is a source of strength beyond Imagina- 
ation If the spirit of man can enter into real com- 
munion with the eternal spirit that rules the universe, 
and loves every creature in that universe, what an 
opportunity for removing the limitations that seem to 

'""ttodear enough that certain human limitations 

can not be removed. It is rare that a person born 

blind can have sight restored. But great things can be 

done toward overcoming limitations. The average boy 

cannot run very far at a time. But if he have the per- 

"stence and grit, he gets what we call his "second 

wnd " Students of psychology have come to be .eve 

that there is in each human soul a sort of mental and 

spiritual "second wind;" that there are sources of 

intellectual strength, springs of spiritual power, lying 

in strata below the surface, which we rarely use. and 

y et which would double our powers. Everyone has 

had the experience of accomplishing a work that had 

to be performed at a given hour, even though already 

ired and ready to rest. Everyone burdened with 



large tasks is constantly thursting back the barriers of 
weariness and inclination. Thus gaining new power, 
working with greater ease. The boy who lifted the 
calf every day could lift the bull. The man who does 
a little more than he can is the one whose powers 
thrive Of course there is a limit to this use of the 
margin of power. We must not go to the spring too 
often or it becomes muddied and finally runs dry. 
But we can extend the range of all our powers in an 
amazing way, simply by persisting until we draw upon 
the reserves ordinarily unused. "1 have meat to eat 
that ye know not of." expressed a limitation of the 
desciples' power.but it was not meant to exclude them 
from the strength to be gained by partaking of this 
unknown meat. As soon as they caught the spirit of 
Jesus they found the source of his strength and in 
some degree at least they came for refreshment to 
the same abiding nourishment of power, the mind and 
heatt ot God the Father. 

I hope that you, gentlemen of the graduating class, 
have learned in these four years with us. the lesson 
of human limitations; I hope that you have been 
humbled by the knowledge that your own powers, 
measured by the powers of some other men. and by 
the tasks to be done, are small and weak. And yet 
1 trust that this consciousness of restriction has not 
led to loss of courage. 1 hope that you face your 
new life with the spirit both of humility and of elation, 
recognizing your limitations, and yet conscious of your 
capacity to perform some of the world's work, and 
eager for the chance to try your powers against all the 
barriers that exist. I hope your ambition to succeed 
may be permeated with the passion for generosity of 
heart that you may catch a vision of the largeness 
and full meaning of life, and that you may come to 
find your constant strength in real fellowship with Him 
in whom we all live and move and have our being. 
.. As the marsh-hen secretly builds on the watery sod. 
Behold I will build me a nest on the greatness of God : 
I will fly in the greatness of God as the marsh-hen fl.es 
In the freedom that fills all the space 'twill the marsh and 

the skies : 
By so many roots as the marsh-grass sends in the sod 
1 will heartily lay me a-hold on the greatness of God. 






Profs. Paige and Ashley will spend the summer 
abroad in travel and study. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



207 



STATEMENT OF SOCIAL UNION TAX. 1908-9. 

July I. 190U, To cash on hand, $ 12.01 

June 20, 1909. To 265 fees at $1.50, 397.50 

" " " By Furniture purchased, $171.75 
" Piano installments, 

13 mos. at $7.00 per 91.00 

•' Insurance, 4.00 

Trophy room case, 126.06 

" Cash on hand, 16.70 



< < 1 1 < 1 



« > u t < 



it ti it at 



$409.51. $409.51 
Henry W. Turner, President. 
Fred. C. Kenney, Treasurer. 



MILITARY APPOINTMENTS AND AWARDS. 

I. The following appointments of commissioned 
officers in the Corps of Cadets are announced : — 
Roger S. Eddy to be Major. 

Henry A. Brooks to be Captain company A. 
Frank T. Haynes to be Captain company B. 
Edward H. Turner to be Captain and Adjutant. 
Horace W. French to be Captain company C. 
Louis C. Brown to be Captain company D. 
Lawrence S. Dickinson to be 1st Lieut, company A. 
George Paulsen to be 1st Lieut, and Ordinance officer. 
Dexter E. Bailey to be 1st Lieut, and Quartermaster. 
Lyman G. Schermerhornto be 1st Lieut, company B. 
Frank L. Thomas to be 1st Lieut, company C. 
Walter R. Clarke to be 1st Lieut, company D. 
William C. Johnson to be 2nd Lieut, company A. 
Leonard S. McLaine to be 2d Lieut, company B. 
Otto V. T. Urban to be 2d Lieut, company C. 
Josiah C. Folsom to be 2nd Lieut. Company D. 

II. The following appointments of Non-commis- 
sioned Staff Officers are announced , — 

Allen P. Bursley to be Sergeant Major. 
Harold H. Howe to be Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Percy W. Pickard to be Color Sergeant. 
Herbert J. Baker to be Color Sergeant. 

III. The following promotions and appointments 
of 1st Sergeants are announced : — 

Arthur H. Sharpe to be 1st Sergeant company A. 
Irvin C. Gilgore to be 1st Sergeant company B. 
Samuel R. Parsons to be 1st Sergeant company C. 
Edward A. Larrabee to be 1st Sergeant company D. 



IV. The following promotions and appointments 
of Sergeants are announced: — 

Harold F. Willard to company A. 
Frederick A. McLaughlin to company B. 
Gaston E. Labouteley to company D. 
Irving C. Brown company C. 
Willard F. Henry to company C. 
George P. Nlckerson to company B. 
John E. Dudley to company D. 
Clarence A. Smith to company B. 
Philias A. Racicot to company D. 
Lomas 0. Stevenson to company C. 
Edward I. Warren to company A. 
Henry B. Morse to company C. 
E. N. Davis to company A. 
Herman A. Pauly to company C. 
Ralph H. Armstrong to company A. 
Herbert W. Blaney to company B. 
Rupert S. McNayr to company D. 
Thomas W. Bean to company D. 

V. The following appointments of Corporals are 
announced: — 

William E. Philbrick to company B. 
Gordon W. Ells to company C. 
Marshall C. Pratt to company D. 
Lawrence S. Caldwell to company A. 
Ezra I. Shaw to company D. 
John J. Fitzgerald to company C. 
Quincy S. Lowry to company A. 
Robert W. Lamson to company D. 
Edward B. Young to company C. 
Herman C. Walker to company B. 
Henry L. Holland to company A. 
Ralph R. Parker to company A. 
Fred A. Castle to company D. 
Benjamin G. Southwick to company C. 
Joseph W. Covill to company B. 
Theodore J. Moreau to company B. 
Curtis Peckham to company C. 
Daniel G. Tower to company A. 
Arthur F. Kingsbury to company B. 
Robert M. Gibbs to company D. 

VI. The following announcements of Lance Cor- 
porals are announced : — 

Herbert J. Stack to company A. 
John E. Pierpont to company B. 










I 




208 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Austin R. Turner to company C. 
Lawrence P. Rockwood to company D. 

VII. The following appointments and promotions 
In the Band are announced: — 
Raymond L. Whitney to be Captain and Leader. 
Frank A. Prouty to be Chief Musician. 
Irving W. Davis to be Principal Musician. 
James F. Adams to be Drum Major. 
Park W. Allen to be Srgeant. 
Ervin L. Winn to be Sergeant. 
Philip B. Prouty to be Sergeant. 
William C. Sanctuary to be Sergeant. 
Gay M. Heald to be Corporal. 
Ernest M. Folger to be Corporal. 
Earle 1. Wilde to be Corporal. 
Alden C. Brett to be Corporal. 
Frank B. Hills to be Corporal. 
Roger A. Warner to be Corporal. 

VIII. To be clerks in office of Commandant: — 
Leonard M. Johnson, Howard H. Wood. 

The above appointments are made with the approval 
of the President of the College. 

By order of Captain Martin. 



Curtis, Capt. 22nd U. S. Infantry, W. G. PenfleH, 
Capt. of Ordinance Dept. U. S. A., and Maj. Ham- 
mond, M. V. M. 



NOTICE. 

Football practice will begin next fall on Monday 
morning. Sept. 13. Coach Rice wishes all candi- 
dates for the team to be on hand at that time. 

R. H. Allen. 



The medals were awarded as follows: — 
Out door shoot:— Gold medal ; P. A. Racicot. Ml; 
Silver medal; L. 0. Stevenson, Ml; Bronze medal; 
Geo. Paulsen, MO. 

Indoor shoot :— Gold medal ; A. H Sharpe, Ml; 
Silver medal; George Paulsen, MO; Bronze medal ; 
H. J. Baker, Ml. 

To the Junior having the highest military standing, 
a gold medal to Roger S. Eddy, MO. 

To the Sophomore having the highest military 
standing, a silver medal to Samuel R. Parsons, Ml. 
To the Freshman having the highest military stand- 
ing, a silver medal to H. L. Holland, M2. 

The following officers were reported to the Ad- 
jutant General of the United States and to the Ad- 
jutant General of Massachusetts for high merit in 
their military work: — 

Major R. C. Llndblad, Capt. L. S. Corbett, Capt. 
H. W. Turner, Capt. R. C. Potter, Capt. M. W. 
Thompson, Lieut. G. M. Codding, Lieut. F. C. 

Warner. 

The judges at the competive drills were S. A, 



BASEBALL. 

Freshmen, 5 ; Sophomores, 2. 
The annual ball game between the lower classes 
was won by the Freshmen last Saturday. The 
Sophomores led up to the ninth inning, when three 
hits, three errors, three stolen bases, and a wild pitch 
let four runs in for the Freshmen. They had previ- 
ously scored in the sixth on an error. Covill's stolen 
base, and William's clean three bagger. The Soph- 
omores scored in the third on two errors and a stolen 
base and again in the fifth on a hit, a sacrifice, and 
an error. Things looked bad for 1912 in the second. 
Pickard hit and stole. Nickerson fanned, but Brown 
hit and stole. Curran passed Armstrong, filling the 
corners. Williams relieved Curran in the box, and 
fanned the next two. 

The features of the game were the clever box-work 
of Hill and Williams, and the hitting of Williams 
and Durling. Each catcher allowed five stolen bases. 
The score : 

1912. 



Ackerman »... 
Hickey. 2 b., 
Carpenter. 2 b.. 
Covlll. 3 b.. 
Williams, c. f.. P-. 
McCarr. r. f.. I. f.. 
Durllnt. 1 *>•• 
Muller. 1 I.. 
McLane. r. f.. 
P«ckh*m. c. 
Curran. p.. c. f.. 



Morse. 2 b.. 
Bean, a.. 
Piper. 3 b., 
Hill. P.. 
Pickard. 1. I.. 
Nickerson, t b„ 
Brown, c. 
Armstrong, c. (.. 
Barrows, r. f., 
Winn, r. f., 



A.S. 

5 
3 
2 

4 
3 

4 
4 
4 


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1611. 
A.». *• 



27 12 



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£ 

10 5 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



209 



Sacrifice hits— Piper. Brown, Armstrong. Two-base hit— Peck- 
ham. Three-base hit— Williams. Stolen bases— Piper 2. Hill. Pick- 
ard, Brown. Williams 2. Covlll. McCarr. Muller. Struck out— by Wil- 
liams 8. by Curran 2. by Hill 13. Base on balls-by Curran, by 
Williams, by Williams, by Hill. Wild ntch— Hill. Passed ball— 
Peckham. Time— 1 h. 45 min. Umpire— OCrady. 



The following members of the Senior Class have 
been elected to Phi Kappa Phi :— George M. Brown, 
Jr., Charles S. Putnam, Harold D. Phelps, En Lung 
Hsleh, Rockwod C. Llndblad. James S. Whaley, and 
Arthur W. Hubbard. 




ENGLISH. 
The Department of English would like to receive 
notice at an early date from any members of the 
class of 1910 or 1911 who wish to be considered for 
possible appointments as student theme-readers for 
1909-1910. 

A few changes in the plan of the English work 
have been made for next year, as shown by the cata- 
logue. One of these throws the main part of the 
elementary work in English in the Freshmen instead 
of the Sophomore year. Every student is required 
to secure three credits in English after completing 
the Sophomore work and before graduation ; but he 
is at liberty to take the necessary work In any semes- 
ter or semesters of the Junior-Senior years. Only 
two subjects run through the year — agricultural jour- 
nalism, a one- hour course, and English language and 
literature (Literature 15 and 16), a three hour 
course. All other courses are independent of one 
another. It seems from the catalogue that a student 
Is not restricted to a three hours' credit if he wishes 
to elect courses amounting to a larger number of 
credit hours, for no restriction of the amount of work 
that may be elected in any department is stated. 
One of the new courses, "Individual Reading," pro- 
vides for reading either in the department of English 
or out of it. The reading may be none in any sub- 
ject, provided it is not technical. For instance, in 
chemistry reading upon the lives of the great chem- 
ists would be non-technical, reading upon the chem- 
istry of sugar-making would be technical. In animal 
husbandry or horticulture, reading upon the subject 
of evolution would be non- technical, a specific study 



of animal or plant-breeding would be technical. The 
reading must be so chosen as to broaden the outlook 
and help to develop philosophical conceptions, ai.d 
must not tend toward immediate specialization. 

The editor of one of the agricultural papers has 
written to Professor Neal, saying that he notices the 
new agricultural journalism course reported in the 
newspapers, and is glad to see it. because it will help 
to prepare young men to serve on agricultural papers 
and turn their attention to the profession of agricul- 
tural journalism. He also suggests that the class 
may contribute material' for the magazine. It is 
thought possible that some such arrangement as this 
may be made with one or more papers. 

AGRICULTURE. 
The Grinnell prize competition was held on Satur- 
day, June 12. Those of the examining committee 
present were John Bursley, Warren C. Jewett, and 
Noble B. Turner. The prizes will be three this vear 
of $25, $15 and $10 instead of two as in years 
before. Those competing were Ide, J. B. Thomp- 
son. Alger, McGowan, Willis, White, M. Geer, 
Briggs. Waters, Barnes, and Ingalls. 

BOTANY. 
Dr. Stone took the Springfield Botanical Club to 
Mt. Toby on June 12 for a botanizing expedition. 

HORTICULTURE. 
The department of Pomology is soon to receive 
another consignment of models of fruits for the use 
of the class in Systematic Pomology. They will 
consist of plumes, pears and peaches, and are made 
by Mr. Potter of Guelph, Ontario, who made the fine 
models of apples already on hand. 

Professor Sears has been elected Vice- President 
for Massachusetts of the New England Fruit Show to 
be held in Boston in October. 

Professor Sears lectured before the Middlesex 
North Pomona Grange at Lowell, June 4, on "Spray- 
ing" ; and before the Appalachian Mountain Club on 
"Orcharding as a Means of Redeeming the Hill 
Towns of New England" on June 10 at Boston. 

Professor Waugh has started on a trip to Canada 
for his health stopping on his way at Burlington, Vt. 

Mr. E. C. Canning, Head Gardener of Smith Col- 









1 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




210 



l.« visited th« florlculiural department recently. 
H. Is especially interested in the college a, the pres- 
e„, time as he has a son ready to enter the Fresh- 
man class this fall. 

FLORICULTURE. 

Several changes have been Introduced in the 

course to be given by the florlcultural department 

ng tne comfng year. Up to the present time the 

course has been given only In the Senior year, but 

next year it will be extended to the Junior year. 

During the first half a practical course In green- 
house management will be given. There w» be n 
definite lecture work, but the students w be taught 
to do the practical work which goes with £• man 
agement of a commercial and private establishment 
Sudents electing this course will be ejected o| 
arrange their hours according to the needs of the 

^During the second half year the instruction given 
will be in greenhouse design, and heating. The 
Ilsefor the first semester of the Senior year 
w U be in the care and management of greenhouse 
c ops design work, and the retail trade. Dunng he 
cond haU year the instruction will be in spring 
g eenhouse crops. In this course It Is intended to 
give more attention to the treatment of outdoor 
herbaceous material, which should form a prominent 
feature of florist work. 

Professor White has recently received from the 
Morehead Manufacturing Company a complete model 
Ttheir return steam trap used In greenhouse heating. 
This model will be used for class-room demonstra- 
Uoi The action of this firm In donating the mode 
s greatly appreciated by the college and it is hoped 
IZ f ms may cooperate In this way, so the instruc- 
Uon may ^ more practical and helpful along all lines. 
The grading around French Hall is now under way 
and this will add materially to the attractiveness of 
French Hall and the range of glass-houses. 



SOME « MASSACHUSETTS" AGGIES 
WHOM I KNOW. 

[To be Continued.] 

x Walter Lev, Morse, B. Sc. , terminal en 
gineer Grand Central terminal Improvements, N. Y 



and H. R. R- R- Co., was born In 1874 at 
Middleboro ; fitted for college in the Middleboro High 
School; entered and was graduated with '95; Kappa 
Sigma ; president of class ; business manager of 
.•Signal"- during summer vacations worked for city 
of Brockton on park and sewer surveys ; fall after 
graduation in same city on sewer construction; May, 
1896 engaged with New Haven road In division 
engineer's office at Boston, remaining there until 
,uly 1900 on maintenance and various improvements, 
he largest piece of work being the abolition of Dor^ 
Chester Avenue grade-crossing; July. 1900, appointed 
roadmaster's engineer at Plymouth; February, 1902 
transferred to office of construction at Boston, survey- 
ing scheming and executing the plans and carrying 
o't the work incidental thereto for the abolition of 
grade crossings in Taunton, Worcester and Putnam 
'and saw to the completion of shops at Readville 
Resigned. February, 1902 and came with New York 
Central immediately succeeding the wreck in the 
Fourth Avenue tunnel ; went on as assistant engineer 
in the construction of an underground loop for subur- 
ban trains, but the studies of that year led to the 
larger scheme of depressing the whole yard from 
Madison to Lexington Avenue and from 42nd to 57th 
street, with 34 express tracks on upper level and 15 
suburban besides a train yard, on the lower level ; Mr. 
Morse made all the original surveys for the work and 
had charge of the field work during the execution of 
the contracts until July. 1906 when he was made 
office assistant to the terminal engineer ; in October 
he was sent into the field again as resident engineer 
in charge of the contractors and also of the Held 
engineers; In June 1907, was appointed terminal 
engineer, having full charge of the designs, he 
making, letting and executing of the contract and 
The construction of the terminal, his staff cons^ting of 
an office assistant, a designing engineer in charge of 
the construction of buildings and a resident engineer 
in charge of the terminal yards. Since August, 1903, 
$20,000,000 have been expended for land and con- 
struction and about as much more for electrifying the 
lines and also about $5,000,000 for buildings Was 
married June 26. 1907 to Miss Mary F Harrison A. 
B., Barnard. '03; one daughter. Member of Gradu- 
ates Club of New York city. Mt. Morris Baptist 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



21 I 



church; 2nd vice-president M. A. C. Club of New 
York. The writer has never hesitated to trouble 
Morse when working up an annual M. A. C. festival 
in New York; the busy men are always those to call 
upon for help; the foregoing record should be an 
inspiration to every young man who thinks there is no 
chance for him in life ; how Levi Stockbridge would 
rejoice, if living, in such successful work. 

Dr. John A. Cutter, '82. 



Alu 



mm. 



NOTICE— The invitations are out for the 
Sophomore- Senior Promenade to be held on 
June 23. Apply to L. 0. Stevenson, 191 1. 
Don't fail to be here for the Prom. 

'75. — J. F. Barrett and Mrs. Barrett spent sev- 
eral hours in town the 12th. 

78-ex-'80.— Dr. J. N. Hall of Denver recently 
visited his brother, Hon. Alfred A. Hall of Revere, 
and his sister, Mrs. Wm. P. Brooks of Amherst. 

'87. — J. M. Marsh, president of the Marsh Soap 
Co., recently returned from California where he 
spent the last five months. He expects to be at M. 
A. C. at Commencement. 

'92. — G. E. Taylor attended the meeting of the 
Connecticut Valley Breeders Association at North- 
ampton, June 9. 

'95. — C. B. Lane, who has been Assistant Chief 
of the Dairy Division in the Department of Agricul- 
ture at Washington for the past five years, has 
resigned his position to take charge of the Scientific 
Department of the Supple Dairy Co., Nth and 
Jefferson Streets, Philadelphia. This offer is a very 
flattering one and carries with it a generous salary. 
He will equ